(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Children's Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Course catalog, 2003-2004"


■ 








Undergraduate and Graduate 

Course Catalog 

2003 • 2004 





nil 



The University 
OF THE Arts® 



Digitized by tine Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/coursecatalog200304univ 



jaesssssrassEsiagasgareaiaE 



College of Art and Design 

College of Performing Arts 

College of Media and Communication 




Undergraduate and Graduate 
Course Catalog 
2003 • 2004 



I 



The University 
OF THE Arts® 



320 South Broad Street 

Philadelphia, PA 19102 

i« 800 •616 'ARTS 

www.uarts.edu 



The arts have the power to transform society. They play an essen- 
tial role in ensuring and enhancing the quality of life. The University 
of the Arts is committed to inspiring, educating and preparing inno- 
vative artists and creative leaders for the visual, performing, and 
media arts of the 2 1 st century. 

The University of the Arts is the nation's only university devoted 
exclusively to education and professional training in design, visual, 
media, and performing arts. Located in the heart of Philadelphia, 
The University of the Arts was founded in 1 987 through the consoli- 
dation of two century-old institutions: the Philadelphia College of 
Art and the Philadelphia College of Performing Arts. A third aca- 
demic unit, the College of Media and Communication, was 
established in 1996. Offering undergraduate and graduate degrees in 
communication, crafts, dance, graphic design, industrial and 
museum exhibition design, fine arts, illustration, media arts, multi- 
media, museum communication,, music, theater, writing, and 
museum and arts education, the University prepares its students to 
assume over 150 careers in traditional and emerging arts and related 
fields. 

The University of the Arts 
320 South Broad Street 
Philadelphia, PA 19102 

215-717-6000 

1 -800-6 16-ARTS 

http://www.uarts.edu 

CEEB code 2664 

Title IV code 003350 



Nondiscrimination Policy 

The University of the Arts is committed to maintaining an envi- 
ronment in which students, faculty, and staff may pursue academic, 
artistic, and professional excellence. This environment can be 
secured only through mutual respect and unconstrained academic 
and professional interchange among faculty, staff and students. 
Under the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Educational 
Amendments of 1972, other state and federal laws, and The 
University of the Arts policy, the faculty, staff, and students of the 
University are entitled to participate in and obtain the benefits of 
University programs, activities, and employment without being dis- 
criminated against on the basis of their race, creed, color, ethnic 
background, national origin, sex, gender, age, religion, disability, or 
sexual orientation. 

The University also strictly prohibits any form of retaliation or 
reprisal against anyone reporting allegations of harassment or dis- 
crimination, or cooperating in an investigation of such a report. 
Such retaliation shall be considered a serious violation of the 
University'snondiscrimination policy and shall be punishable by 
discipline up to and including termination, regardless of whether the 
charge of discrimination is substantiated. However, if an employee, 
student, or faculty member is found to have intentionally lied about 
a claim of discrimination, or brought a claim in bad faith, knowing 
that the allegation of discrimination is false, then that employee, stu- 
dent, or faculty member may be subject to discipline or expulsion. 

Examples of prohibited retaliation include: threatening reprisals 
against the person who complained or cooperated in an investiga- 
tion; unfairly changing a person's evaluations, assignments, grades, 
or working conditions; or otherwise continuing any harassment or 
discrimination against such person. 

The University of the Arts gives equal consideration to all appli- 
cants for admission and financial aid, and conducts all educational 
programs, activities, and employment practices without regard to 
race, color, sex, religion, national origin, ethnic background, or dis- 
ability. Direct inquiries to the Office of the Dean of Students/ADA 
Coordinator, The University of 
the Arts, 320 S. Broad Street, Philadelphia, PA 19102; 
215-717-6618. 

This catalog was updated as of July 2003. The University of the 
Arts reserves the right to revise any information herein at its discre- 
tion and without prior notice. 

Trademarked names appear throughout this catalog. Rather than 
list the names and entities that own the trademarks or insert a trade- 
mark symbol with each mention of the trademarked name, the 
publisher states that it is using the names only for editorial purposes 
and to the benefit of the trademark owner with no intention of 
infringing upon that trademark. 



The University of the Arts' is registered with the US Patent and 
Trademark Office, Reg. No. 2,341,258. UArts"' is also registered 
with the US Patent and Trademark Office, Reg. No. 2,677,865. 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



^m 



The University of the Arts 
Contents 



4 Academic Calendar 2003-2004 

The University of the Arts 

6 Mission Statement 

6 History of Tiie University of the Arts 

6 Accreditation 

7 Coilegeof Art and Design 
7 College of Performing Arts 

7 College of Media and Communication 

7 Degree Programs 

8 University Libraries 

9 Academic Policies and Procedures 
15 Grading Policies 

Undergraduate Degree 
Requirements 

20 Undergraduate Degree Requirements 

2 1 Division of Liberal Arts 

College of Art and Design 



College of Performing Arts 



Course Descriptions 



28 


College of Art and Design 


31 


Undergraduate Programs 


32 


Minors 


35 


Foundation Program 


37 


Crafts 


40 


Fine Arts 


46 


Graphic Design 


48 


Illustration 


50 


Industrial Design 


52 


Media Arts 


58 


Art Education 


60 


Art Therapy 


62 


College of Art and Design 




Graduate Programs 


64 


Post-Baccalaureate Options 


66 


Art Education 


69 


Visual Arts 


71 


Book Arts/Printmaking 


73 


Ceramics, Painting, or Sculpture 


75 


Industrial Design 


77 


Museum Studies 


78 


Museum Communication 


79 


Museum Education 


80 


Museum Exhibition Planning 




and Design 



84 


College of Performing Arts 


132 


Art Education 


85 


Minors 


134 


Art Therapy 


90 


The School of Dance 


134 


Communication 


90 


Ballet 


137 


Crafts 


90 


Jazz 


142 


Dance 


90 


Modem 


146 


Electronic Media 


90 


Dance Education 


147 


Fine Arts 


96 


The School of Music 


149 


Foundation 


97 


Instrumental Performance 


151 


Graphic Design 


97 


Voice 


153 


Graduate Seminars 


97 


Composition 


153 


Liberal Arts 


97 


The School of Music 


166 


Industrial Design 




Graduate Programs 


169 


Illustration 


97 


Master of Arts in Teaching Music 


171 


Internships 


97 


Master of Music in Jazz Studies 


172 


Master of Fine Arts in 


111 


The School of Theater Arts 




Ceramics, Painting, or Sculpture 


HI 


Acting 


173 


Multimedia 


111 


Musical Theater 


176 


Museum Studies 


HI 


Applied Theater Arts 


179 


Music 






186 


Media Arts 






186 


Photography/FilmA'ideo/Animation 


Coilegeof Media and 


190 


Printmaking/Book Arts 


Communication 


193 


Painting/Drawing 






195 


Sculpture 


120 


College of Media and Communication 


196 


Theater Arts 


121 


Minors 


201 


Writing for Film and Television 


126 


Communication 






128 


Multimedia 


General Information 


130 


Writing for Film and Television 







204 Admission 

210 Tuition and Expenses 

213 Financial Aid 

224 Student Services 

226 General Information 

227 Code of Conduct 
229 Student Code 

235 University Guidelines for 
Responsible Computing 

235 Academic Computing 

237 Continuing Education Programs 

238 Administration 

239 Board of Trustees 

240 Faculty Index 
243 Index 

257 Campus Map 



Tlie University of the Ail.s Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



Academic Calendar 2003-2004 



Summer 2003 

May 

Monday. May 5 and Tuesday. May 6 
Summer Session I & II Registration 

Monday, May 5 

Spring 2003 semester ends 

Tuesday, May 6 thru Friday, May 9 
Examinations 

Monday. May 12 thru Friday, May 16 
Studio Critiques and Juries 

Friday. May 16 

Grades due to Registrar - 12:00 noon 



Saturday. May 17 
Student Residences close - 



12:00 noon 



Monday, May 19 

SUMMER SESSION I BEGINS 

Continuing Education Summer Session I begins 

Wednesday, May 21 
Awards Ceremony 

Thursday, May 22 
Commencement 

Monday. May 26 
Memorial Day Holiday 

Thursday. May 29 
CPA/CMAC Academic Review 

Friday. May 30 

CAD Academic Review 

Deadline — Fall 2003 Application for Readmission 

June 

Thursday. June 12 and Fnday. June 13 

Fall 2003 Registration for Summer Foundation 

Summer II Registration 

Friday. June 20 
Summer MFA Orientation 

Monday, June 23 

Summer MFA Classes Begin 

Friday, June 27 

SUMMER SESSION I ENDS 

Monday, June 30 

SUMMER SESSION II BEGINS 

Continuing Education Summer Session I ends 

July 

Tuesday, July 1 

Continuing.Education Summer Session II Begins 

riday. July 4 

Independence Day Holiday 
University Closed 



Monday, July 7 

Summer World of Dance begins 

Summer Pre-College begins i 

Tuesday, July 8 

Summer — New Student Placement Test 

Friday, July 1 1 

Summer I grades due to the Registrar - 12:( 



)p.m. 



Friday, July 1 8 

2-wk Summer World of Dance program ends 

August 

Friday, August 1 

4-wk Summer World of Dance ends 

Pre-College ends 

Saturday, August 2 

Residence Halls close at 5:00 p.m. 

Friday, August 8 
SUMMER^SESSION II ENDS 

Monday, August 1 1 

Continuing Education Summer Session II ends 

Friday, August 15 

CAD Summer MFA program ends 

Summer Session II grades due to Registrar 

Tuesday, August 19 

Summer MFA grades due to Registrar 

Saturday, August 30 

Fall - New Student English Placement Test 

Student Residences open/move-in 

Saturday, August 30 thru Tuesday, September 2 
New Student Orientation 

September 

Monday, September 1 ■ * 

Labor Day Holiday 

Tuesday, September 2 

Advising/Registration for all new transfers, grad- 
uate, and readmitted students 9 a.m. - 2 p.m. 

Wednesday. September 3 
Registration Continued 9 a.m - 5 p.m. 

Thursday. September 4 

Fall 2003 semester classes begin 

Thursday, September 4 thru Wednesday, 

September 17 

Drop/ Add period/Late registration 

Monday. September 15 

Continuing Education Fall Session begins 

Friday, September 19 

Deans and Directors submit additional Spring 

2004 course chanses to Registrar 



October 

Saturday, October 4 
Saturday School begins 

Friday, October 17 

Last day for removal of Spring 2003 Incomplete 

"I" grades 

Monday, October 20 

Automatic conversion from "I" to "F" grade 

Friday, October 24 

Last day to withdraw with a "W" grade 

Saturday. October 25 
Admission Open House 

Monday, October 27 thru Friday, November 7 
Advising for Spring 2004 registration 

November 

Advising for Spring 2004 registration 
Continues thru Friday, November 7 

Monday, November 3 

Deadline for Readmission Application for 

Spring 2004 semester 

Thursday, November 6 

Joint University Advising Session 

Monday, November 17 

Graduation Petitions for Dec. 2003 due to 

Registrar 

Monday. November 17 thru Friday, November 

21 

Registration for Spring 2004 

Thursday, November 27 
Thanksgiving Day Holiday 

Thursday, November 27 thru Sunday, November 30 
Thanksgiving Vacation — Residence Halls 
remain open 

December 

Friday, December 12 
Fall 2003 classes end 

Saturday. December 13 
Saturday School ends 

Sunday, December 14 

Continuing Education Fall session ends 

Monday, December 15 thru Friday, December 19 
Examinations, critiques, and juries 

Friday. December 19 
Fall 2003 semester ends 
Residence Halls close at 5:00 p.m. 
Grades due to Registrar - 12 p.m. 
Documents for students graduating Dec. 2003 
due to Registrar 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



Spring 2004 

January 

Thursday, January 1 
New Year's Day Holiday 



Thursday. January 8 
CPA/CMAC Academic Review 

Friday. Januar\' 9 
CAD Academic Review 

Thursday, January 15 
New Student Registration 
Residence Halls open. 9 a.m. 

Thursday. January 15 and Friday. January 16 
New Student Orientation 



Monday March 15 thru Friday. March 19 
CAD Freshmen Major Orientation Week 

■Friday. March 19 
CAD Freshman Major Selections due to Registrar 

Monday, March 22 thru Friday April 2 
Advising for Fall 2004 Registration 

April 

Advising for Fall 2004 continued thru Friday, 
April 2 

Saturday April 3 
Admission Open House 

Monday, April 12 thru Friday. April 16 
Registration for Fall 2004 



Thursday, June 10 and Friday. June 1 1 

Fall 2004 Registration for Summer Foundation 

students 

Summer 11 Registration 

Monday. June 21 

CAD Summer MFA program begins 

Fridav. June 25 

SUMMER SESSION I ENDS 

Foundation Summer semester ends 

Monday. June 28 

SUMMER SESSION II BEGINS 

Continuing Education Summer Session I ends 

Tuesday. June 29 

Continuing Education Summer Session II begins 



Monday. January 19 
Martin Luther King Holiday 

Tuesday, January 20 

Spring 2004 semester classes begin 

Tuesday January 20 thru Monday, February 2 
Drop/Add period/Late Registration 

Friday, January 23 

Continuing Education Spring session begins 

February 

Monday, February 2 
Last day of Drop/Add 

Wednesday, February 4 

Deans/Dir submit Fall 2004 courses to Registrar 

Saturday, February 14 
Saturday School begins 

Monday, February 16 

Graduation Petitions for May 2004 due to 

Registrar 

Friday, February 20 

Deans/Dir submit Spring 2005 courses to 

Registrar 

Friday, February 27 

Last day for removal of Fall 2003 Incomplete "I" 

grades 

March 

Monday, March 1 

Automatic conversion from "I" to "F" 

Friday, March 5 

Last day to withdraw with a "W" grade 

Monday. March 8 thru Friday March 1 2 
Spring Break/Residence Halls remain open 

Monday, March 15 
Spring 2004 classes resume 

Monday March 15 

2004/2005 Financial Aid Applications Due 



Saturday, April 24 
Saturday School ends 

Sunday, April 25 

Continuing Education Spring Session ends 

May 

Monday May 3 
Spring 2004 classes end 

Monday, May 3 and Tuesday May 4 
Registradon for Summer Sessions I & II 

Tuesday, May 4 thru Friday, May 7 
Liberal Arts Examinations 

Monday, May 10 thru Friday. May 14 
Studio critiques and juries 
Foundation Summer semester begins 

Friday. May 14 

Final grades due to Registrar by 12 p.m. 
Documents for students graduating May 2004 due 
to Registrar 

Saturday, May 15 

Student residences close at 12 p.m. 

Monday. May 17 

Continuing Education Summer Session I begins 

SUMMER SESSION I BEGINS 

Wednesday May 19 
Awards Ceremony 

Thursday May 20 
Commencement ceremony 

Thursday. May 27 
CPA/CMAC Academic Review 

Friday. May 28 

CAD Academic Review 

Monday. May 3 1 
Memorial Day Holiday 

June 

Tuesday. June 1 

Fall 2004 Application for readmission due 



July 

Sunday. July 4 
Independence Day Holiday 

Monday, July 5 

University closed for observance of Independence 

Day 

Wednesday, July 7 

Summer New Student English Placement test 

Friday. July 9 

Summer I grades due to Registrar 

Monday July 12 

Summer Worid of Dance begins 

Summer Pre-CoUege begins 

Wednesday. July 15 

Graduation Petitions for August 2004 due to 

Registrar 

Friday. July 23 

2-v. k Summer Worid of Dance ends 

August 

Friday, August 6 
SUMMER SESSION II ENDS 
4-wk Summer World of Dance ends 
Pre-College ends 

Wednesday, August 1 1 

Continuing Education Summer Session II ends 

Friday August 13 

CAD Summer MFA program ends 

Summer Session II grades due to Registrar 

Tuesday, August 17 

CAD Summer MFA grades due to Registrar 

Saturday, August 28 

Fall New Student Placement Test 

Student Residences open/move-in 

Saturday. August 28 thru Tuesday. August 31 
New Student Orientation 

Tuesday. August 31 and Wednesday. September I 
New Student Registradon 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



Mission Statement 



The University of the Arts is devoted exclusively to education and 
training in the arts. Within this community of artists the process of 
learning engages, refines, and articulates all of our creative capabili- 
ties. Our institution was among the first to contribute to the formafion 
of an American tradition in arts education. We continue to develop 
interpreters and innovators who influence our dynamic culture. 

The University's Mission: 

To educate and professionally train artists in the visual 
and performing arts, in design, in media, and in writing; 

To grant graduate and undergraduate degrees, diplomas, 
and certificates in the arts; 

To provide educational programs centered in the arts to 
multiple populations; 

To encourage relationships among the arts; 

To promote high standards in creativity and scholarship; 

To prepare artists who will contribute responsibly 
to our culture; 

To challenge students to think critically, joining knowledge 
and skill to their individual creative vision; 

To anticipate and to cultivate new art forms as they emerge. 

The University of the Arts offers instruction across a broad spec- 
trum of artistic disciplines. We serve the community in which we 
reside, the professions for which we prepare new members and, ulti- 
mately, the society whose culture we both sustain and advance. 

The University's goal is to direct each student's quest for creative 
self-expression toward a productive role in society. Our programs 
develop the student's talent, aesthetic sensibility, conceptual and 
perceptual acumen, cultural awareness, and professional expertise. 
The curricula integrate specific knowledge and skills needed for 
technical mastery of the various arts disciplines with a significant 
exainination of conceptual and humanistic studies. 

To this end, the University must gather and retain a distinguished 
teaching faculty offering a breadth of professional expertise. Their 
scholarly work and artistic exploration have national and interna- 
tional consequences for the institution. Our educational programs 
seek to stimulate and influence not only our students but the very 
disciplines that we teach. 



History of 

The University of the Arts 



The University of the Arts is the largest comprehensive educa- 
tional institution of its kind in the nation, preparing students for 
professional careers in design, visual, media, and performing arts, 
and emerging creative fields. 

The University of the Arts has evolved from two century-old insti- 
tutions: the Philadelphia College of Art and the Philadelphia College 
of Performing Arts. 

The Philadelphia College of Art was formed in 1876 along with 
the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Initially known as the 
Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial Art, the institution 
was established in response to the interest in art and the Centennial 
Art Exposition. In 1949, the school became known as the 
Philadelphia Museum School of Art, reflecting the expanded pro- 
grams that trained artists in many other areas, including the fine arts. 
The school received accreditation in 1959, and in 1964 separated 
from the Museum to become the Philadelphia College of Art. Today, 
the College of Art and Design of The University of the Arts offers 
curricula in crafts, design, fine arts, media arts, museum communi- 
cation, museum education, and art education. 

The performing arts programs of The University of the Arts date 
from 1 870, when three graduates of the Conservatory of Leipzig 
opened one of the first European-style conservatories of music in 
America: the Philadelphia Musical Academy. The Philadelphia 
Musical Academy became an independent college of music in 1950, 
granting a Bachelor of Music degree after a four-year course of 
study, one of only eight such music colleges in the nation at the 
time. While still offering only a music program, the school changed 
its name to the Philadelphia College of Performing Arts in 1 976, the 
first such college in Pennsylvania. One year later the former 
Philadelphia Dance Academy became part of the Philadelphia 
College of Perf'orming Arts, and in 1 983 the School of Theater Arts 
was created, thus achieving the college's ideal program of studies; 
dance, music and theater arts. 

In 1983, the Philadelphia College of Art and the Philadelphia 
College of Performing Arts joined to become the Philadelphia 
Colleges of the Arts, and in 1 987, The University of the Arts was 
inaugurated. In the fall of 1 996, the University created a new aca- 
demic unit, the College of Media and Communication, which 
emphasizes the integration of art, technology, and communication. 
The first two BFA degree programs offered by this new college were 
Writing for Film and Television, and Multimedia; the third, a BS 
degree program in Communication, began in September 1999. 



Accreditation 



The University of the Arts is authorized by the Commonwealth of 
Pennsylvania to grant degrees in the visual, performing, and related 
arts, and is accredited by the Middle States Association of Colleges 
and Schools (Commission on Higher Education, Middle States 
Association of Colleges and Schools, 3624 Market Street, 
Philadelphia, PA 19104; telephone; 215-662-5606). The College of 
Art and Design is also an accredited institutional member of the 
National Association of the Schools of Art and Design, and the 
Industrial Designers' Society of America. The School of Music is 
also accredited by the National Association of Schools of Music. 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



College of Art and Design Degree Programs 



The College of Art and Design offers the Bachelor of Fine Arts 
degree in Animation, Crafts, Film/Animation, Film/Digital Video, 
Graphic Design, Illustration, Painting and Drawing, Photography. 
Printmaking/Book Arts, and Sculpture. A major in Industrial Design 
leads to the Bachelor of Science degree. Crafts offers a post-bac- 
calaureate certificate program. Art Education offers a 
post-baccalaureate pre-certification program. 

At the graduate level are programs leading to the degrees of Master 
of Arts in Art Education, Master of Arts in Museum Communication, 
Ma,ster of Arts in Museum Education, Master of Industrial Design, 
Master of Arts in Teaching in Visual Arts, Master of Fine Arts in 
Book Arts/Printmaking, Master of Fine Arts in Museum Exhibition 
Planning and Design, and a low-residency summer Master of Fine 
Arts in Ceramics, Sculpture, or Painting. Teaching certification is 
offered on a non-degree basis, either independently or in conjunction 
with an undergraduate degree in the College of Art and Design. 
Concentrations in Art Therapy and Digital Fine Arts are offered, as 
well as seven minors. 

College of Performing Arts 

The School of Dance offers Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees in 
Ballet, Modem, Jazz/Theater Dance, and Dance Education, as well as 
a two-year Certificate in Dance. 

The School of Music offers the Bachelor of Music degree in Jazz 
Vocal Performance. Instrumental Performance with a jazz/contempo- 
rary focus, and Composition. In addition, a four-year Undergraduate 
Diploma and two-year Certificate in Dance or Music are offered. 

At the graduate level, the School of Music offers the Master of 
Arts in Teaching in Music Education and the Master of Music in Jazz 
Studies. 

The School of Theater Arts offers the Bachelor of Fine Arts in 
Theater Arts, with majors in Applied Theater Arts, Acting and 
Musical Theater. 

College of Media 
and Communication 



The College of Media and Communication offers three degree pro- 
grams. The department of Communication offers a Bachelor of 
Science in Communication with concentrations in Advertising, 
Digital Journalism, and Documentary Production. The department of 
Multimedia offers a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Multimedia and a minor 
in Information Architecture. The department of Writing for Film and 
Television offers a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Writing for Film and 
Television. 



Bachelor of Fine Arts 
(BFA) 

Acting 

Animation 

Applied Theater Arts 

Ballet 

Crafts 

Dance Education 

Film/Digital Video 

Film/Animation 

Graphic Design 

Illustration 

Jazz/Theater Dance 

Modem Dance 

Multimedia 

Musical Theater 

Painting and Drawing 

Photography 

Printmaking/Book Arts 

Sculpture 

Writing for Film and Television 

Bachelor of Music 
(BM) 

Composition 

Instrumental Performance 
Vocal Pertbrmance 

Bachelor of Science 
(BS) 

Communication 
Industrial Design 

Post-Baccalaureate 

Certificate 

in Crafts 

Post-Baccalaureate 
Teacher Program 
(non-degree) 

Master of Fine Arts 
(MFA) 

Book Arts/Printmaking 

Ceramics 

Museum Exhibition Planning 

and Design 
Painting 
Sculpture 

Master of Arts (MA) 

Art Education 
Museum Communication 
Museum Education 



Master of Arts in 
Teaching (MAT) 

Music Education 
Visual Arts 

Master of Industrial 
Design (MID) 

Master of Music (MM) 

Jazz Studies 

Undergraduate 
Certificate 

Dance 
Music 

Undergraduate 
Diploma 

Music 

Minors 

Animation 

Book Arts 

Digital Film/Video 

Documentary Video 

E-Music 

E-Publishing 

Figurative Illustration 

Film/Digital Video 

Game Design 

Information Architecture 

Multimedia 

Narrative Video 

Photography 

Screenwriting 

Strategic Advertising 

Studio Photography 

Typography 

Web Design 

Web Drama 

Concentrations 

Art Therapy 
Digital Fine Arts 
Pre-Certification in 
Art Education 



The University of the Ans Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



University Libraries 



Carol Graney 

cgraney@uarts.edu 

Director of University Libraries 

Greenfield Library, 1 st tloor Anderson Hall 

215-717-6281 

The University libraries are central to the educational mission of 
the University, enabling and enriching every student's professional 
preparation and general education. Through the services the library 
staff provides, and through the materials it collects or to which it 
provides access, the University libraries seek to enhance teaching 
and improve learning, and to educate students in the arts to be suc- 
cessful and productive users of information. 

The libraries of the University of the Arts include the following 
three campus locations: 

The Albert M. Greenfield Library, on the first floor and lower 
level of Anderson Hall (333 South Broad Street), serves as the main 
library for the campus, containing materials in many formats on art 
and design, communication, dance, theater, film and television, mul- 
dmedia, liberal arts, and other general subjects. The Greenfield 
Library also houses the libraries' administrative offices and technical 
services operation, as well as the library's Picture File, University 
Archives, and the library's Special Collections, with particular 
strengths in book arts and textiles. 

The Music Library, on the third tloor of the Merriam Theater 
Building (250 South Broad Street), is a specialized library serving 
academic programs and interests in music. Its holdings and services 
are also important for students and faculty studying or needing 
information about dance, musical theater, and other areas related to 
music. The Music Library contains listening facilities for recorded 
sound in addition to general reading areas and a music education 
resource area. 

The Slide Collection, in Anderson Hall, houses a large collection 
of 35mm slides relating to subjects of interest to all University 
visual and performing arts programs and Liberal Arts courses. Light 
tables and slide carousels may be used for viewing the library's and 
one's own slides. 

The total holdings of the libraries are more than 101,000 books 
and bound periodicals, 14,600 music scores. 1 15,000 mounted and 
encapsulated pictures, 166,000 slides, and 12,000 items of recorded 
music in LP and CD formats. The library also has a growing collec- 
tion of audiovisual materials in videocassette, videodisc, DVD. and 
multimedia formats. Listening and viewing facilities, IntemetAVorld 
Wide Web access, and photocopiers are available in addition to gen- 
eral reading facilities. 

Information about the libraries' collections is available through an 
online catalog that is accessible from computers in the Greenfield 
and Music Libraries or via the World Wide Web. Records for library 
materials can be searched by author, title, keyword, subject, and call 
number. Once a record is found, information including its shelf loca- 
tion and whether or not it is available for circulation is displayed. 
Traditional card catalogs are also maintained for some specialized 
collections, which have not yet been added to the automated system. 
Other electronic reference tools are also available, including online 
and CD-ROM periodical indexes, databases, and encyclopedias. 



Reference assistance and course reserves are available at each 
University library location. The libraries provide other information 
services such as interlibrary loan, class instruction in research tech- 
niques and library use, and advanced electronic research capabilities 
including discounted online database searching for students. The 
library maintains reciprocal use arrangements with other nearby aca- 
demic libraries. 

Albert M. Greenfield Library 
215-717-6280 

Music Library '■ . 

215-717-6292 ' 

Visual Resources/Slide Collection 
215-717-6290 

University Libraries' Web site 
http://library.uarts.edu 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



Academic Policies 
and Procedures 



Lynn Powell Dougherty 

ldougherty@uarts.edu 

Registrar 

Office of the Registrar 

Second Floor, Dorrance Hamilton Hall 

215-717-6420 

215-717-6417 (Fax) 

Office of Registrar email: registrar@uarts.edu 

The Office of the Registrar develops and maintains all records and 
files relating to the students' academic life at the University. Course 
and program transactions and changes become official only when 
property processed through the Office of the Registrar Students who 
are formally admitted to the University and have paid all applicable 
tuition and fees will be allowed to register. 

Students must have a program of courses documented and 
approved by the required advisor(s). All students are advised to 
obtain a copy of their curriculum requirements as soon as possible 
after admission to the University and to check them against their 
transcripts after each term. Student copies of the transcript are avail- 
able upon request. The Office of the Registrar maintains the official 
academic record for each student and is responsible for certification 
of completion of requirements for graduation. 

Transcript Request Procedures 

You may request a transcript by completing a transcript request 
form (available in the Office of the Registrar) or providing the fol- 
lowing information; 

• Name under which you attended the University or any prede- 
cessor institutions 

• Current address and telephone number 

• Social security number 
•Date of birth 

• Last date of attendance 

• Major/Degree program 

• Address where transcript is to be sent 

• Signature; transcripts will not be released without the original 
signature of the requesfing sUident 

Fees: 

• Currently enrolled students can obtain an unofficial "student" 
copy of their transcript from the Office of the Registrar at no charge. 
Official transcripts are subject to the following fees; 

• $5.00 fee for each transcript that you request (checks should be 
made payable to THE UNIVERSITY OF THE ARTS). Mailed via 
U.S. Mail, normally within three to five business days. 

• FAX Service; Transcript requests received by fax will be subject 
to a $10 fee, processed within three to five business days and sent 
via U.S. Mail. Faxed requests must include a credit card number, 
expiration date, and an authorizing signature. The University accepts 
Visa or Mastercard payments. 

• Emergency service (not available for requests to the Continuing 
Education Program or Professional Institute for Educators) is avail- 
able for a $12 fee. Transcripts will be processed within one day of 
receipt of request and sent out via U.S. Mail. 

• FedEx service - U.S. only (not available for The Continuing 
Education program or Professional Institute for Educators) — avail- 



able for a $30 fee. The transcript request will be processed within 
one day and sent via FedEx overnight service. 

• International service (not available for The Continuing 
Education program or Professional Institute for Educators )-avaiI- 
able for a $40 fee. The transcript request will be processed within 
one day and sent via DHL. 

• Transcripts will not be processed if there is a financial hold on 
the account of the student. Please allow three to five working days to 
complete requests. 

Mail requests to; 
Office of the Registrar 
The University of the Arts 
320 S. Broad Street 
Philadelphia, PA 19102 
Attention; Transcript Requests 

or 

Fax requests to; 

Office of the Registrar 

The University of the Arts . \ 

Attention; Transcript Requests 

215-717-6417 

Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act 
(FERPA) 

(Please also see "access to Student Records" in the Student Code 
located in the rear of this catalog.) The Family Educational Rights 
and Privacy Act (FERPA) of 1974 affords students certain rights 
with respect to their educational records. They are; 

• The right to inspect and review the student's education records 
within 45 days of the day the University of the Arts receives a 
request for access. 

• Students should submit to the registrar, dean, head of the aca- 
demic department, or other appropriate officials, written requests 
that identify the record(s) they wish to inspect. The University offi- 
cial will make arrangements for access and notify the student of the 
time and place where the records may be inspected. If the records 
are not maintained by the University official to whom the request 
was submitted, that official shall advise the student of the correct 
official to whom the request should be addressed. 

• The right to request the amendment of the student's education 
records that the student believes is inaccurate or misleading. 

Students may ask the University to amend a record that they believe 
is inaccurate and misleading. They should write to the University offi- 
cial responsible for the record, clearly identify the part of the record 
they want changed, and specify why it is inaccurate or misleading. 

If the University decides not to amend the record as requested by 
the student, the University will notify the student of the decision and 
advise the student of his or her right to a hearing regarding the 
request for amendment. Additional information regarding the 
hearing procedures will be provided to the student when notified of 
the right to a hearing. 

• The right to consent to disclosures of personally identifiable 
information contained in the student's education records, except to 
the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent. 

One exception, which permits disclosure without consent, is dis- 
closure to school officials with legitimate educational interests. A 
school official is a person employed by the University in an adminis- 
trative, supervisory, academic or research or support staff position 
(including law enforcement unit personnel and health staff); or a 
person or company with whom the University has contracted (such 
as an attorney, auditor, or collection agent). 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the offi- 
cial needs to review an educafional record in order to fulfill his or 
her professional responsibility. 

• The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of 
Education concerning alleged failures by State University to comply 
with the requirements of FERPA. The name and address of the 
Office that administers FERPA is: 

Family Policy Compliance Office 
U.S. Department of Education 
400 Maryland Avenue, S.W. 
Washington, D.C. 

• Directory Information - The University of the Arts has estab- 
lished that the following information will be considered as 
"directory information" and the University may release it without 
prior consent from the student: 

Name 

Address ' ■ • ' 

Telephone listing 
E-mail address 
Date and place of birth 

Major field of study _ , 

Participation in officially recognized activities 
Dates of attendance 
. Enrollment status 
Degrees and awards received 
Last institution attended 

In accordance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy 
Act of 1974, students may request to have this information withheld 
from public information. Students must file this request within the 
first three weeks of the term. 

Verification of Enrollment 

Students often need to send additional information concerning 
their enrollment to insurance companies, loan services, scholarship 
programs, and other outside parties. Any request for verification of 
enrollment beyond the directory information listed below must be 
made in writing and signed by the student wishing to release the 
information. The request for verification must state exactiy which 
information the student wants released and who is authorized to 
receive it. There is no fee for this service. The Office of the Registrar 
will verify enrollment for future terms only after the student has reg- 
istered in classes and has been cleared by the Student Billing Office. 
Normal service for other verifications of enrollment is three to five 
working days from the time the request is received. 



Academic Advising and Student 
Responsibility 

Each student is personally responsible for observing all regula- 
tions in the catalog that may affect academic progress, financial 
obligations, relationships with University authorities, transferability 
of credits, acceptance of credits for graduation, and eligibility to 
graduate. 

Academic advising at the University is designed to assist students 
in directing and completing their degree programs by providing 
guidance through contact with informed advisors and by providing 
information in various publications. Students are expected to refer to 
this catalog and course bulletins for information on policies, proce- 
dures, and deadlines. Students in doubt about any College or 
University regulation should seek advice from their academic 
advisor or the Office of the Registrar. 

In preparing for registration, students consult with their faculty 
advisors, who help them assemble schedules for the semester and 
who give final approval to all course selections. Students entering the 
final year of their degree program are urged to consult with the 
Registrar to ensure that all major requirements will be completed on 
schedule for graduation. Students are responsible for knowing the 
specific requirements of their particular degree program and for 
tracking their academic progress toward the degree. Meeting require- 
ments for graduation is ultimately the student's responsibility. 

Change of Address 

It is essential that students keep the Office of the Registrar 
informed of all current addresses: permanent and billing. Change of 
Address forms are available in that office. Grades, schedules, and 
other important information are mailed to the addresses provided by 
the student. 

Change of Name 

Students must notify the Office of the Registrar of any change of 
name (through marriage, divorce, etc.) by bringing to the office an 
original legal document showing the change, which may be photo- 
copied and kept on file. This is important in order to maintain all of 
the student's records in one place and prevent future confusion with 
transcript requests, etc. 

Registration 

Official registration forms must be filed in order for the student to 
attend class. Students are responsible for knowing regulations 
regarding withdrawals, refund deadlines, program changes, and aca- 
demic policy. 

Matriculating students must register for subsequent semesters in 
accord with the posted schedule (see Academic Calendar). Failure to 
register will result in a late registration fee (see below). A student 
is not officially registered until Finance Office clearance has 
been obtained. 

In order to register for classes, it is necessary to meet any finan- 
cial or academic criteria that have caused a hold to be placed on a 
student's record. 

All students are responsible for completing any prerequisites 
required for enrollment in a course. Failure to complete prerequisites 
may result in cancellation of registration in the course requiring 
the prerequisite. 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



Place Holders 

During registration some students have trouble finding courses 
that fit in their schedules. As a result, they may not be able to reg- 
ister for the 12-credit minimum necessary to maintain full-time 
status. In order to allow such students to pick up a course(s) during 
the Drop/Add period and thereby maintain their full time status for 
Financial Aid purposes, a "place holder" is added to the student's 
registration. It is presumed that the student will find an additional 
course during Drop/Add. Prior to the beginning of the Drop/Add 
period, each student who has a place holder will be reminded, via 
mail, to register for the additional course! s). If the student does not 
register for additional coursework by the end of Drop/Add. the place 
holder will be deleted. At that time, a list of these students in this 
status will be generated for the Finance and Financial Aid Offices. 
Under no circumstances will a place holder remain on their registra- 
tion after the Drop/ Add period ends. 

Late Registration 

A late-registration fee of $35 will be charged to any student who 
has not completed registration by the first day of term. Late registra- 
tion may jeopardize a student's chance of obtaining his/her desired 
course schedule. 

Matriculated Students 

Matriculated students are those who have applied, been accepted, 
and enrolled in a degree program at The University of the Arts 
during the semester for which they were admitted. Course credits 
completed prior to matriculation at the University will not neces- 
sarily be accepted into the degree programs. In no case will more 
than six credits taken as a non-matriculated .student at The 
University of the Arts be accepted into the degree program. Students 
seeking degrees may enroll for part-time or full-time study. 

Non-Matriculated Students 

A student who takes classes in a major department but is not 
enrolled in a degree program at The University of the Arts and has not 
submitted an application to the Office of Admission qualifies as a 
non-matriculated student. 

Non-matriculated status provides opportunity for students to 
study with a specific professor, or pursue additional college-level 
instruction for those who already hold a bachelor's degree. 

Non-matriculated students may enroll for a maximum of 1 1 .5 
credits per semester and may not audit any classes. 

Students who subsequently enroll in a University of the Arts 
degree program may apply a maximum of six credits taken as a non- 
matriculated student to their degree at the discretion of the 
department director/chair Non-matriculating students who are 
simultaneously enrolled or have plans to enroll at another institution 
may transfer credits to that institution if they have received prior 
approval in writing from that institution. 

To enroll as a non-matriculated student, please contact the Office 
of the Registrar. Please be advised that there are no payment plans or 
financial aid opportunities for non-matriculated students. 

Non-matriculated students are otherwise governed by all the rules 
and regulations that apply to matriculated students. 

Full-Time Credit Load/Overloads 

Full-time undergraduate students are defined as those who are 
enrolled in at least 12 credits a semester Students wishing to take 
more than 1 8 credits in a semester must obtain pennission from the 



dean of their college. Factors such as grade-point average and 
progress in meeting degree requirements will be considered in 
giving permission for an overioad. Excess credits are subject to 
additional charges at the standard credit rate. Registration as Audit 
or Pass/Fail is counted the same as all other academic credit for the 
purpose of determining tuition. 

Graduate students are considered full-time if enrolled in at least 
nine credits per term. 

International students cannot drop below full time status. 

Student Classification 

A student's class is determined by the number of credits earned, 
regardless of the number of semesters of enrollment or the student's 
standing in his or her major program. Class status is a factor in ,' 
determining financial aid eligibility and is one indicator of academic 
progress. Class standing is also used to prioritize scheduling during 
registration. 
Undergraduate class status is determined as follows: 

Ul up to 29.5 credits 

U2 30 - 59.5 credits 

U3 60 - 89.5 credits 

U4 90 - 123 credits 

U5 more than 123 credits 

Graduate status is determined as follows: 

Gl up to 17.5 credits 

G2 1 8 or more credits 

Transfer of Credit 

Students may receive credit for courses taken at other regionally 
accredited institutions that are similar in content, purpose, and stan- 
dards to those offered at The University of the Arts. A minimum 
grade of "C" is required in order to present a course for transfer 
credit. Only credits are transferable, not grades. 

Candidates are given a preliminary transfer credit evaluation at 
the time of admission; final award of transfer credit and placement 
level is subject to receipt of final official transcripts and verification 
by the registrar at the time of enrollment. 

Graduate Double Degree Policies 

Graduate students already enrolled in a master's degree program 
at the University of the Arts may apply to simultaneously pursue a 
second master's degree. A second degree may be added only after 
the successful completion of at least one semester of graduate study, 
with a grade-point average of at least 3.0. Students who are inter- 
ested in this option must be aware that completion of two degrees 
will likely require additional time to complete and requires intensive 
advising and coordination of requirements. 

Students currently enrolled in a master's degree program who 
wish to pursue a second master's degree must request, in writing, 
that the Registrar forward a copy of their transcript and official file 
to the director of the program to which they are seeking admission. 
The director of the second program may require the student to 
submit materials for portfolio review, and may require additional let- 
ters of reference. The director of each graduate program is 
responsible for coordinating any required portfolio review. Portfolio 
requirements are listed on the Graduate Application or may be 
obtained directly from the graduate director or coordinator Final 
acceptance into a double degree program must be approved by the 
Director of Graduate Programs. 

1 . A student may be awarded a particular degree from the 



The University of the Ans Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



University only once; i.e., once the student has earned an MA, he or 
she may not be awarded another MA. 

2. A student may not receive two different master's degrees from 
the same program; i.e.. he or she cannot pursue both the MA in Art 
Education and MAT in Visual Arts. 

3. A student may earn up to two master's degrees, either simulta- 
neously or sequentially. 

4. If a student is approved for a double degree, and six credits are 
shared between the two programs, the student may transfer a max- 
imum of six additional credits from an accredited institution. 

5. A student who has completed one degree and wishes to matric- 
ulate in another does so by applying to the new program through the 
Office of Admission. 

6. Students in the Summer MFA program who wish to pursue a 
second graduate degree will be charged the regular graduate tuition 
rate in the semesters in which they are pursuing two degrees. 

Change of Major/Degree Program/College 

Students may request a change of major through the Office of the 
Registrar. Students are advised to initiate the Change of Major 
Petition prior to registration for the upcoming semester. The petition 
requires the approval of the appropriate chairpersons or directors of 
both the former and the intended new department or school. The stu- 
dent will be required either to present a portfolio or to audition as 
part of the transfer review process. Deadlines are June 1 for the fall 
semester and November 1 for the spring semester. 

After completion of a change of major, students are advised to 
review their degree program requirements with their new academic 
advisor, the department chair or school director, and the dean of the 
appropriate college. 

Change in Degree Requirements 

Students who have not completed their degree requirements at the 
end of seven years from the date of initial matriculation may be sub- 
ject to new degree requirements, which will be determined by the 
department chairperson and the Office of the Registrar on a case-by- 
case basis. 

Course Substitutions 

Occasionally a student may not be able to enroll in the exact 
course required for the degree program, or the department may rec- 
ommend an alternate course to better suit a specific academic goal. 
In this case, the student is to request an approval for a course substi- 
tution from the department chairperson or program director. The 
director/chair lists the required course and the approved substitution 
on the form. After completion the department chairperson or pro- 
gram director submits the form to the Office of the Registrar for 
processing. 

Schedule Revision - Drop/Add 

Beginning with the first week of the semester, only students who 
have obtained finance office clearance may revise their schedules 
without academic penalty until the end of the Drop/Add period. Any 
schedule revision must be approved in writing by the appropriate 
instructor or department chairperson and advisor This is accom- 
plished by completing a Drop/Add Form, obtaining the appropriate 
signatures, and submitting the form to the Registrar's Office for pro- 
cessing. The Drop/Add period takes place during the first 10 days of 
classes each semester in accordance with the Academic Calendar. 



Withdrawal from a Course 

A student may withdraw from a course with a "W" (Withdrawal) 
from the last day of the Drop/ Add period through the last day of the 
seventh week of the semester The withdrawal form must be signed 
by the course instructor and the student's advisor and submitted to 
the Office of the Registrar prior to the deadline. 

After the end of the seventh week, a "W" is possible only under 
unusual circumstances such as an accident or severe illness, which 
must be documented. Permission for an exceptional withdrawal 
must be given by the instructor and the Dean/Assistant Dean of the 
college. 

A student who wishes to withdraw from all of his or her classes 
must initiate an official Withdrawal or Leave of Absence from the 
University as outlined in this catalog. If a student withdraws from all 
of his/her classes and does not officially withdraw from the 
University or take a leave of absence, he/she may be withdrawn 
from the University or dismissed in accordance with Academic 
Review policies. 

Leave of Absence 

A student may request a Leave of Absence by obtaining a Leave 
of Absence Form, available in the Office of the Registrar. Only stu- 
dents in good academic standing may request a Leave of Absence. 
Undergraduate students who maintain a minimum 2.0 cumulative 
and semester grade-point average (GPA) are considered to be in 
good standing. A Leave may be granted for one or two semesters, 
with approval granted by the Dean of the appropriate college, pro- 
vided that the student is in good standing. 

A Leave of Absence will not be granted after the seventh week of 
the semester in which the student is enrolled. If a student wishes to 
leave during a semester and the request is approved, he/she may 
withdraw from the current semester with the leave taking effect in 
the current and subsequent semester. In this instance, the student 
will be subject to the grading, withdrawal periods, and withdrawal 
refund policies listed elsewhere in this catalog. 

A student who is granted a Leave of Absence is unconditionally 
eligible to register for classes for the semester immediately after the 
Leave expires. (A student may return before the expiration of the 
Leave by indicating his/her intention to do so in writing to the Office 
of the Registrar.) 

If the student does not register for the term following the Leave's 
expirafion, but wishes to resume his/her studies at a later date, the 
student must apply for readmission following the guidelines in this 
catalog. 

A graduate student may take a Leave of Absence prior to the com- 
pletion of all coursework, subject to approval by his/her program 
director. Graduate students may take a maximum of two one- 
semester Leaves of Absence throughout their course of study, 
whether in sequence or as needed. Once the thesis or Master's of , 
Music graduate project has begun and all coursework has been com- 
pleted, graduate students are not eligible for a Leave of Absence. 
Students must register and pay for the thesis conUnuation fee for 
successive semester and are not eligible for a Leave of Absence. 

Leave of Absence is granted only to students who are in good aca- 
demic standing. If a student is granted a Leave of Absence for a 
future semester, but is subsequently placed on probation for the cur- 
rent semester, the Leave Of Absence will be converted to a 
withdrawal. Notification of a conversion to "withdrawn" status will 
be provided in writing by the office of the Registrar. Students who 
are converted to a "withdrawn" status must apply for readmission 



The University of the Ans Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



through the Office of the Registrar in accordance with the policies 
described in this catalog. 

The following procedure must be followed to obtain a Leave of 
Absence from the University: 

1. The student obtains a Request for Leave of Absence Form from 
the Office of the Registrar. 

2. The student must get approval from his/her department 
chair/director. 

3. The Student must submit form to the college dean for approval. 

4. After the Leave of Absence approvals are obtained, the student 
submits the completed form to the Office of the Registrar for pro- 
cessing and coding. A copy of the form will then be distributed to 
the student and the college dean. 

Withdrawal from the University 

A student may withdraw from the University by initiating an offi- 
cial Withdrawal process with the Office of the Registrar. Students 
who withdraw from the University prior to the beginning of the fall 
or spring semesters or summer sessions, or prior to the end of the 
Drop/Add period, do so without academic penalty. 

Official Withdrawals after the Drop/ Add period, but prior to the 
end of the seventh week of the respective fall or spring semester or 
second week of the respective summer session, will result in the 
notation of the grade "W" (Withdrawal) for all courses. 

Students are not permitted to withdraw without academic penalty 
from the University after the end of the seventh week of a fall or 
spring semester or second week of a summer session, except when 
non-academic extenuating circumstances exist, in which case docu- 
mentation (by a physician or a counseling professional) must be 
presented and approval of the appropriate Dean must be obtained. 

Students who have withdrawn and who wish to resume their 
studies at a later date must submit a Request for Readmission Form 
to the Office of the Registrar in accordance with application dead- 
lines and pay the readmission fee. 

The following procedure must be followed to obtain official 
Withdrawal from the University: 

1 . The student obtains a Withdrawal from the University Form 
from the Office of the Registrar. 

2. If the student does so in person, the Office of the Registrar will 
advise the student to visit the Dean of Students. 

If the student withdrawing from the University is not physically 
on campus, the Office of the Registrar will accept a letter signed by 
the student. After processing the withdrawal, appropriate depart- 
ments will be notified. 

Non-attendance in classes or non-payment of tuition does not 
constitute grounds for withdrawal. The University does not recog- 
nize non-attendance in classes or non-payment of tuition as the 
equivalent of withdrawal. 

Readmission 

Written appeal for reinstatement as a degree candidate should be 
addressed to the Office of the Registrar by June 1 for the fall 
semester and November 1 for the spring semester. There is a $50 
application fee. Appropriate deans, departmental chairpersons/direc- 
tors, and the Finance Office must endorse the readmission prior to 
registration. The major department reserves the right to require tran- 
scripts, letters of recommendation, an additional portfolio review, or 
audition. Credit for courses taken seven or more years prior to the 



date of readmission will be re-evaluated in conjunction with degree 
programs currently offered. Academic units may choose not to 
accept courses regardless of when they were completed for credit 
toward the degree. Final determination will be made by the dean of 
the college. In the event of Dismissal, an application for readmission 
will not be entertained until a full academic year has elapsed. 
Readmitted students will carry the cumulative GPA that was in place 
at the completion of the last semester attended at L'Arts. 

Please also note that previous censure from the Academic Review 
Committee may apply to any readmitted student. 

Registering for Other Categories 
of Study 

Independent Study 

Independent Study offers a matriculated student the opportunity 
to initiate individual research or advanced projects that are beyond 
the limits of the standard cumculum. with limited supervision. 
Independent Study is available to junior and senior undergraduate 
students who have a minimum 2.5 GPA and to graduate students in 
good standing. To enroll in an Independent Study, the student must 
follow these guidelines: 

1 . Obtain an Independent Study Form from the Office of 
the Registrar. 

2. Prepare a proposal and identify a University of the Arts faculty 
member having expertise in the area of investigation who is willing 
to ser\'e as the course advisor. With the consultation of the course 
advisor, complete the Independent Study Fomi, which must include 
a semester plan for the course of study, indicating the number of 
credits being taken and the evaluation criteria. The form must be 
signed by the course advisor and the student's department 
chair/school director. 

y. Present the approved Independent Study Form at registration or 
within the Drop/Add period, along with your registration or 
Drop/Add form. The course number for an independent study is the 
department code (the course advisor's department) and course 
number "999" for undergraduates (Example: PR999) and the depart- 
ment code and "799" for graduate students (Example: PR799). 

4. Each Independent Study may be taken for one to three credits 
in Liberal Arts, 1.5 to six credits in CAD, and one to six credits in 
CPA and CMAC. 

5. The student is responsible for documenting the content of the 
Independent Study work to other institutions or outside agencies. 

6. Students cannot elect the Pass/Fail or Audit options for 
Independent Study. 

Independent Study cannot fulfill major requirements. Independent 
Study may serve as free, studio, and liberal arts electives, depending 
on the topic of investigation. Students cannot apply more than 12 
total credits of independent study towards their degree requirements. 

Credit for an Independent Study cannot be reduced or increased 
after the student has registered. 

Internships 

Internships allow matriculated undergraduate students in their junior 
or senior year to earn academic credit while working in their chosen 
field. Internship courses are scheduled during the fall and spring semes- 
ters and, with special permission, during the summer. To register for an 
internship, see the course bulletin and the appropriate depattment for 
current offerings. Internship courses are graded on a Pass/Fail basis. 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



13 



With the approval of their dean and department chair/director, stu- 
dents may take internships during the summer. Those who intend to 
do so and wish to receive academic credit for the experience must 
pre-register in the spring if the internship is to be included on the fall 
schedule and transcript. (Such courses will be calculated as part of 
the fall credit load for billing purposes.) It is the responsibility of 
students wishing to take summer internships to identify faculty who 
are willing to sponsor and are able to supervise their work. Summer 
internships cannot be added to the schedule once the internship has 
begun. 

Students may not apply more than six internship credits toward 
their degree requirements, with the exception of students who major 
in Dance or Theater. For detailed information please see the 
Internship section of the Art and Design section of this Catalog, and 
the course descriptions in the back of this catalog. 

Undergraduate Minors/Concentrations 

The University offers minors and concentrations for students who 
wish to focus on a specific discipline through organized electives. 
Please refer to the college sections of this catalog for information 
about eligibility, prerequisites, and course requirements. You may 
also contact the departments directly for additional information. 

Students wishing to include a minor as part of their undergraduate 
program are governed by the following guidelines: 

1. Students must meet eligibility requirements, which may 
include a satisfactory grade point average, prerequisites, and depart- 
mental portfolio review. 

2. Intent to complete a minor is declared by filing the completed 
Minor Declaration Form with the Office of the Registrar. The forms 
are available in the Office of the Registrar. 

3. A student may not major and minor in the same program, 
except where indicated. 

4. Courses applied to the minor may not also be applied towards 
the major program requirements. 

5. All minors require a minimum of 15 credits, with the exception 
of E-Music for Music majors. Generally, no substitutions to the 
minor requirements are allowed. In exceptional situations where 
substitutions are granted, they must have the approval of both the 
major and minor program advisors. 

6. The minor advisor must approve all courses taken as part of a 
minor. 

7. A student pursuing a minor may be required to complete more 
than the minimum number of credits required to complete the under- 
graduate degree in order to also complete the minor. 

8. Minors are available only to undergraduate students. 

Cross-College Elective Options 
and Prerequisites 

The University encourages students to take courses outside their 
major department and college. To facilitate this goal, the University 
offers a wide selection of courses that are open for enrollment 
without prerequisites. Students may select from introductory elec- 
tives and non-major courses. In general, upper-level courses will 
have specific prerequisites, which must be satisfied prior to registra- 
tion. Students interested in these areas are advised to contact the 
department chairperson or school director regarding specific course 
offerings and prerequisite requirements. 



Private Lessons 

Private instrumental/vocal lessons for non-majors may be taken 
for elective credit ( 1 .5 credits, seven hours of instruction per 
semester) with permission of the Director of the School of Music. 
An additional fee is required. 

Credit Duplication 

No course, including graduate courses, which has satisfied under- 
graduate degree requirements, may be counted again for graduate 
credit. 

Auditing a Course 

Audited courses carry no credit and do not satisfy degree require- 
ments. An audited course may not be repeated for credit. Regular 
tuition rates are charged for audited courses, and they are included in 
the full-time tuition charge. Audited courses will be indicated on the 
transcript with a grade of " AU" and may be registered for until the 
end of the Drop/ Add period. 

Courses With No Credit 

Courses that reflect no credit on a student's transcript (such as 
Graduate Thesis Continuation, Music Jury, Senior Recital, 
Professional Writing Intensive, etc.) or audited courses, still gen- 
erate tuition and registration fees. Students who have questions 
regarding registration for non-credit coursework should contact the 
Finance Office. 

Foreign and Summer Study Programs 

Foreign and summer study opportunities are available through pro- 
grams hosted by other accredited institutions. Interested sUidents 
should meet with the chair or director of their major department to dis- 
cuss issues such as program selection, timing, and feasibility. Those 
who choose to participate must contact the Registrar and the Financial 
Aid Office for advising on transfer of credit and financing options. 

Study Abroad and Off-Campus Study 

Students who wish to study abroad or at another U.S. school for 
one or two semesters as part of the degree program at the University 
of the Arts will need the advice and approval of their department 
chair and a written agreement in advance of the courses. This agree- 
ment must specify how those courses will transfer back into the 
degree program. In most UArts academic programs, off-campus 
study is most successful when conducted in the junior year. 
Interested students should begin by making an appointment in the 
college dean's office to discuss their plans at least six months before 
the program begins. Appointments with the Registrar, Financial 
Aid, and Billing Offices are also recommended at that time. A stu- 
dent maintains his/her status as an active student at the University of 
the Arts in one of two ways: by obtaining approval for a Leave of 
Absence and Approval of Transfer Credit: or, by registering for 
"Exchange" credits and obtaining Approval of Transfer Credit. The 
necessary forms are available in the Office of the Registrar. A stu- 
dent's financial aid package will usually determine the most 
appropriate registration for the off-campus semester. While away, 
the student should keep the Financial Aid Office informed of any 
changes in status. More information regarding Financial Aid can be 
found in the Financial Aid section of this Catalog. Upon his/her 
return, a student should make an appointment with the Office of the 
Registrar to finalize the transferring of credits and receive an accu- 
rate credit count. 



14 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



Undergraduates Enrolled for Graduate Credit 

A student in the final year of the bachelor's degree program may 
take a maximum of six credits of graduate courses toward a master's 
degree, subject to all of the following conditions: 

1 . The student must have completed the junior level of the major 

2. The credits must be over and above the credits required for the 
bachelor's degree and may not be applied to that degree. 

3. The student must have a cumulative GPA of 3.00 or better 

4. Permission is granted by the department chairperson/director 
and dean of the college. 

5. No more than a total of six credits, taken either as an under- 
graduate or non-matriculated student, or taken at another college or 
university, may be applied to the graduate program. 

Graduate Courses for Undergraduate Credit 

Undergraduate students who wish to enroll in a graduate course 
must have junior status (U3), a 3.0 cumulative GPA. and permission 
of the instructor to enroll in the course. 

Graduates Enrolled in an Undergraduate Course 

Graduate students may register for 300-400 level undergraduate 
liberal arts courses or 200-400 level studio courses (with permission 
of the graduate director and director of liberal arts) for graduate 
credit. Graduate students will be expected to contribute at a higher 
level in the classroom and will have additional assignments (read- 
ings, papers, etc.) in order to be granted graduate credit. Students 
are advised to select an area of study that broadens or intensifies 
their background in the arts, education, and related disciplines. 
Often this work contributes directly to preparation of the graduate 
project proposal. 

Graduate Thesis Requirements 

CAD graduate programs require each graduate student to meet 
specific thesis requirements. The requirements may include a thesis 
exhibition or project, and should be successfully completed once the 
student has fulfilled all other program requirements. Students must 
submit three copies of their thesis to their program director in order 
to qualify for the degree. One copy of the thesis remains with the 
department and two are submitted to the Greenfield Library. 

Graduate Project/Tliesis Continuation Fee 

A student who has completed all the course requirements for the 
master's degree and is currently working on the graduate thesis, 
either on or off-campus, must register and pay a graduate thesis con- 
Unuation fee per semester until the thesis is completed and accepted. 
This registration, through the Office of the Registrar, is required in 
each succeeding semester, excluding the summer sessions", until all 
degree requirements are met. Students completing a degree in the 
summer must pay the thesis fee in the final summer semester. 



Grading Policies 



Grading System 




A 


4.00 C 


2.00 


A- 


3.67 C- 


1.67 


B+ 


3.33 D-h 


1.33 


B 


3.00 D 


1.00 


B- 


2.67 F 


0.00 


C-^ 


2.33 




Grades not included in computing 


averages: 


I 


Incomplete 




IP 


In Progress ( Graduate Thesis only) 


NC 


No Credit 




W 


Withdrawal 




OP 


Optional Pass (Grade of "C" or better) 


OF 


Optional Fail (Grade of less than "C") 


AU 


Audit 




P 


Pass 





Thesis Grading 

The grade of "TP" ("Tn Progress") signifies that the student is 
making satisfactory progress toward completing the graduate thesis. 
This grade will apply only to graduate thesis courses where the stu- 
dent's thesis is still in progress. 
This grade is available only for the following courses: 

AE 649 Graduate Project/Thesis 

MS 749 A/B Thesis Development 

ID 749 Master's Thesis DocumentaUon 

FA 795 MFA Thesis Exhibition 

MU 603 Graduate Project/Recital 

An "TP" grade acknowledges the fact that the final course product 
(thesis) may require some period of time past the semester of regis- 
tration to complete. The "IP" grade will remain on the student's 
record until a final thesis grade is submitted by the instructor. In 
some cases, a student will be registered for thesis courses as a 
sequence (e.g.. MS 749 A/B). When the final grade is submitted by 
the instructor, it will replace the "IP" grade. The "IP" grade is not 
computed in the grade-point average. 

In order to remain in good standing while the thesis is "in 
progress," the student must register for the thesis continuation fee 
for each semester he or she is not enrolled in coursework. 

Computing Grade-Point Average (GPA) 

The GPA is computed by multiplying the number of credits 
earned for a course by the numerical value of the grade. The 
resulting figures from all courses for that semester are then totalled, 
and this figure is divided by the total number of credits attempted 
that semester. The grades of I, IP, NC. W, OP, OF, P, and AU are not 
entered in this computation. 

Dean's List 

This list is compiled each semester in the respective deans' 
offices. The Dean's List honors those undergraduate students who 
have met the following criteria: 

1 . Students are full-time undergraduate degree candidates. 
Candidates for certificate, diploma, and master's degrees are 
not eligible. 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



15 



2. A minimum semester GPA of 3.60. 

3. No grade lower than a "B" in any course. 

4. No grade of "I" or "F" in any course. 

5. Enrolled in at least 12 credits for a letter grade. 

Pass/ Fail Option 

1 . In courses taken on a Pass/Fail basis, the standard letter grades 
of "A" to "C" are converted to "OP" by the Registrar. A grade of "C- 
" to "F" is recorded as "OF." 

2. The Pass/Fail grading option must be selected prior to the end 
of the Drop/Add period; no change from Pass/Fail to a regular grade 
or a regular grade to Pass/Fail may be made after that deadline. 

3. Grades of "OP" or "OF" are not computed in the grade- 
point average. 

4. The Pass/Fail policy stipulates that the instructor is not to be 
informed as to who is enrolled on a Pass/Fail basis. 

5. Availability of this option is limited to a total of nine credits in 
Liberal Arts courses or studio electives during the student's under- 
graduate career. Pass/Fail courses may not include First Year 
Writing, Introduction to Modernism, or any required disciphne his- 
tory course. 

Notice of Deficiency 

Instructors may advise a student of unsatisfactory performance in 
the course with a Notice of Deficiency. 

Grade of Incomplete ("I") 

An incomplete grade may be granted only in extraordinary cir- 
cumstances, either personal or academic, which prevent the student 
from completing coursework by the end of the semester. The grade 
"T" is given only when the completed portion of the student's 
coursework is of a passing quality. To receive the grade of 
Incomplete, the student must obtain written approval on the 
Incomplete Form from the course instructor, and the Dean of the 
College or the Director of Liberal Arts prior to the conclusion of the 
semester. 

Incomplete grades not cleared by the end of the sixth week of the 
following semester will be automatically assigned the grade of "F." 
Incomplete Forms are available from the Office of the Registrar. 

Class Attendance 

All students are expected to attend classes regularly and promptly, 
and for the duration of the scheduled instructional time. Individual 
instructors will decide the optimum time for taking attendance and 
may penalize for habitual lateness or absence. Repeated, unexcused 
absences may result in a grade of "F" for a course. 

Students who withdraw from a course or the University must do 
so through the Registrar's Office. Non-attendance does not consti- 
tute an official withdrawal. 

Absences 

Full participation is expected of all UArts students and is neces- 
sary to fully benefit from and succeed in our programs of study. 

Absences from class may result in a lowered grade or an "F" in 
the course, depending on the attendance policies stated by the 
instructor on the syllabus. It is the responsibility of the student to 
arrange with his/her instructor(s) to make up all missed work. 
Failure to do so will also affect the student's grade. 

In the event that absences are the result of extraordinary, docu- 



mented circumstances and are numerous enough that it is impossible 
for the student to qualify for advancement, the student may be 
advised to withdraw from the course. If the course is required, the 
student will also be required to repeat the course in a subsequent 
semester. 

Class/Lesson Cancellations or Lateness of Instructor 

Students must check every morning for notices regarding class or 
lesson changes. Such notices are posted in a designated area. If none 
is posted for the scheduled class or lesson and the instructor is not 
present, students are expected to wait 10 minutes for an hour-long 
class/lesson and 15 minutes for those of longer duration. In the event 
the instructor fails to appear within the 10-15 minute waiting period, 
students are to report to the appropriate School Director's or 
Department Chairperson's office and may then leave without penalty. 

Academic Grievance Procedure 

Students who have a concern or grievance regarding an academic 
matter are encouraged to discuss their concern directly with the 
instructor. If they are not comfortable presenting their concern in 
person, or are not satisfied with the outcome of the discussion they 
should submit their grievance in writing to the instructor, and send a 
copy to the chair/director of the department in which the instructor 
resides. The instructor must respond, in writing, to the student 
within 1 business days. If the student believes that his/her concern 
requires further attention he/she may submit the matter in writing to 
the Office of the Dean of the college in which the course is offered, 
or to the Office of the Director of Liberal Arts when applicable. 

If the Office of the Dean/Director of Liberal Arts does not rule on 
the matter, he/she may convene an Academic Grievance Committee 
or similar committee to review the concern. The composition of the 
Academic Grievance Committee is determined by the Dean/Director 
of Liberal Arts. As a last resort, the Office of the Dean/Director 
and/or the student may forward concerns to the Office of the Provost 
for final resolution. 

Please note that a student may request the assistance of any pro- 
fessional member of the university community at any stage of the 
grievance process. 

Ciiange of Grade 

An instructor may change a grade only if an error occurred in 
computing or recording the final grade, or if reevaluation of previ- 
ously submitted work is warranted. Extra work, beyond that required 
of other class members during the period when the class met, or 
work handed in after the completion of the course, may not be 
offered as reasons for a grade change. 

In exceptional circumstances, a student may be granted an 
Incomplete, which is posted to the transcript as an "I". Once the 
work for the course has been completed, a Change of Grade Form 
must be submitted to the Office of the Registrar in order to convert 
the "I" to the earned grade. Please refer to the section of this catalog 
tiffed "Grade of Incomplete" for more information. 

If a student questions the correctness of a grade, the student 
should address his/her concern in accordance with the Academic 
Grievance Procedures listed above. 

Any change of a final grade may only be made by the course 
instructor, who must personally submit the signed Change of Grade 
Form, including the signature of the college dean, to the Office of 
the Registrar no later than the end of the semester following the one 
in which the grade was given. 



i6 



The University of the Ans Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



Academic Review 

Undergraduate students who maintain a minimum 2.0 cumulative 
and semester grade-point average (GPA) are considered to be in 
good standing. In some programs students must also satisfy min- 
imum grade requirements in major coursework. (Please refer to the 
department sections of this catalog for more specific information on 
minimum grade requirements for certain majors. ) Students who fail 
to meet these minimum requirements will be reviewed by the 
Academic Review Committee. The Committee evaluates the record 
of such students, determines their academic status, gives bench- 
marks for progress in order to assist their return to good standing, 
and, when appropriate, dismisses students, according to University 
policy. 

Academic Censure 

Probation 

The Academic Review Committee places students who are no 
longer in good standing on Probation, in accordance with University 
policy. The Committee can also place additional requirements on 
students to encourage adequate progress towards completion of the 
degree and improved academic performance. These activities may 
include repeating courses, meeting with advisors, limiting the 
number of credits taken in a given semester, tutoring, and/or coun- 
seling. Students placed on Probation will receive a letter from the 
dean's office of their college on advisement from the Academic 
Review Committee, in which the terms and conditions of the 
Committee's decision are explained. 

Dismissal 

The Academic Review Committee may also dismiss students: 

1 . After three consecutive semesters on Probation. 

(Note: the number of consecutive semesters on probation prior to 
dismissal may be reduced for students with a GPA belbw 1.5.) 

2. After a single semester GPA below 1 .0. 

3. After continued failure to fulfill academic probationary require- 
ments specified by the Academic Review Committee. 

Students who are being dismissed will receive a Letter of 
Dismissal from the Office of the Dean of their college. Guidelines 
for appeal of a dismissal, in the event of extenuating circumstances, 
are described in the Letter of Dismissal. Any student whose appeal 
of dismissal is upheld and who is permitted to enroll will automati- 
cally be placed on Probation until the stated conditions are met. 

Academic Censure and Financial Aid 

Academic censure imposed by the Academic Review Committee 
may have financial aid ramifications, including loss of financial aid 
after two consecutive semesters on Probation, (or as the result of not 
completing the minimum number of credits per year). Please refer to 
the Financial Aid section of this catalog for more specific infonnation. 

Disciplinary Dismissals 

In addition to Academic Dismissal, the University may dismiss 
students for disciplinary reasons. In such cases, students will auto- 
matically receive the grade of "W" for all classes in which they were 
enrolled at the time of dismissal. For more information on discipli- 
nary action, please refer to the Student Code of Conduct section in 
this catalog. 



Graduate Probation and Dismissal Policies 

A minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 is required for good standing 
and for graduation for graduate students. If a student is unable to 
achieve a semester or cumulative GPA of 3.0. he or she will be 
placed on probation. If a 3.0 GPA and/or other conditions are not 
attained by the following semester, the student may be dismissed 
from the program. While on Probation, a student will be ineligible to 
hold a graduate assistantship or to receive a University supplemental 
grant-in-aid or scholarship. 

Appeal 

Students who are dismissed may make an appeal to the Academic 
Review Committee regarding the dismissal. In order to request a 
hearing for an Appeal by the Academic Review Committee, students 
must contact the dean's office of their college by the date indicated 
in the Letter of Dismissal. Students must also deliver a written 
request for an appeal to the committee at the time of the hearing, and 
will be notified of the committee's decision at the completion of the 
hearing. 

Graduation Requirements 

It is the student's responsibility to complete the requirements of 
the degree program in which he or she is enrolled. 

Residency Requirements 

The time it takes for a student to reach graduation will depend 
upon the time needed to fulfill The University of the Arts' degree 
requirements. 

Every transfer student must complete a minimum of four full-time 
semesters in residence preceding graduation and must earn a 
minimum of 48 credits in studio and/or Liberal arts courses. 
Transferable credits will be applied only to the specific studio and 
Liberal arts requirements sfipulated for a UArts degree. For this 
reason, transfer students may be required to remain in residence at 
the University for more than the minimum four semesters and to 
complete more than the minimum 48 credits, regardless of the 
number of credits earned at previously attended institutions. 
Transfer credit is evaluated by the department chair or school 
director and the Director of Liberal Arts in consultation with the 
Office of the Registrar. 

Undergraduate Degree Requirements 

To be certified for a degree, a student must: 

• submit a Petition for Award of Degree to the 
Office of the Registrar. 

• fulfill all degree requirements. 

• satisfy the minimum residency requirements 

(four semesters in residence, a minimum of 48 UArts credits). 

• achieve a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0 (C average), and 

• receive the approval of his/her department chairperson or 
director as having met all major requirements, including any and 
all requirements unique to the department. 

Once the student has submitted a Petition for Award of Degree, 
and the Registrar has certified that student as having completed the 
degree requirements, the degree will be awarded. Two-year certifi- 
cates are awarded only to students who are in residence and are 
matriculated in the certificate program. 



The University of the Ails LJndergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



17 



Graduate Degree Candidacy and Completion 

Midway through the program, each graduate student's progress in 
his/her discipline and thesis proposal will be reviewed by the appro- 
priate Graduate Committee to formally determine whether a student 
becomes a degree candidate, and is ready to continue toward devel- 
opment and completion of the thesis or graduate project. 

Graduate students have up to seven years from matriculation date 
to complete a two-year master's program, and up to six years from 
matriculation date to complete a one-year program. 

To be certified for a degree, a student must: 

• submit a Petition for Award of Degree to the Office of the 
Registrar. . . • 

• fulfill all degree requirements, 

• satisfy the minimum residency requirements and 

• achieve a minimum cumuiarive GPA of a 3.0 (B average). 

Graduation - Conferral of Degrees and 
Diplomas 

Students expecting to complete requirements for a degree within 
the year (December. May, or August) are required to file a Petition 
for Award of Degree with the Office of the Registrar by the deadline 
indicated below. The Office of the Registrar is responsible for certi- 
fication of completion of requirements for the degree. Students may 
and are encouraged to petition during registration at the time of their 
final semester. 

Deadline for submission of Petitions: 

• July 1 5 - August completion 

• November 15 - December completion 

• February 1 5 - May completion 

Degrees and diplomas are conferred once a year at the spring 
Commencement Exercises. For students who complete degree 
requirements in other terms, the transcript will be posted "degree 
granted" with either the date of December 3 1 for the fall semester or 
August 31 for summer semester graduates. Diplomas will be mailed 
to August and December graduates' permanent address approxi- 
mately six weeks after the graduation date. 

Graduation with Honors 

Candidates for the baccalaureate degree inay graduate with 
honors only if they achieve a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.6. 



l8 The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/200-4 





"-s^jsasesHESi^siKssra^sna 


1 


w 


P 

Undergraduate 

Degree 

Requirements 


1^ 
1 

i 


1 




Undergraduate and Graduate 

Course Catalog 

2003 • 2004 . : 



in 



The University 
OF THE Arts® 



Undergraduate Degree 
Requirements 



Understanding the degree requirements is crucial to tiie smootli 
progression to graduation. Students, both new freshman and trans- 
fers, are encouraged to consult with their academic advisors 
regularly to ensure that they are making appropriate progress toward 
their degree and to consult their advisor and the Office of the 
Registrar for assistance and clarification of degree requirements. An 
overview of the degree requirements for the baccalaureate follows. 
Please refer to the section of the catalog that describes the major 
programs and to the Division of Liberal Arts section for specific 
course requirements. Students should also keep in close contact with 
their academic advisors regarding official departmental and major- 
specific requirements. 

Most UArts undergraduate degrees require from 123 to 129 
credits. A full-time student, however, may enroll for as many as 1 8 
credits per semester, resulting in a possible 144 credits over four 
years. Students who are interested in additional electives, or who 
wish to fulfill a minor by taking additional elecfives. are strongly 
encouraged to consult with their advisor to develop an effective plan 
for completion of their degree requirements and fulfillment of their 
personal educational goals. 

Liberal Arts (42 credits) 

Freshman Common Core (12 credits) 

First Year Writing 
Introducrion to Modernism 

All students at The University of the Arts must take First Year 
Writing and Introduction to Modernism. 

Freshmen typically take two semesters of First Year Writing 
(HU 1 10 A/B). Based on transcripts, SAT scores, TSWE scores on 
the verbal text of TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language), 
and a placement test, students may be placed in HU 008 (ESL) or 
HU 009. These courses do not satisfy the First Year Writing require- 
ments and will not apply toward degree requirements. Students who 
successfully complete HU 008 or HU 009 will then take HU 1 10 A, 
or may in some cases be assigned to HU 109 B, First Year Writing, 
which counts toward the degree and substitutes for HU 110 A. 

In addition, freshmen take two semesters of Introduction to 
Modernism (HU 103 A/B). Students in HU 008 (English as a 
Foreign Language) and HU 009 begin the Introduction to 
Modernism sequence in the second semester of their studies at the 
University. 

Satisfactory completion of the First Year Writing sequence is 
required prior to registration for HU 130 and above liberal arts 
courses. In addition, failure to complete this sequence will prevent 
the student from proceeding in his or her major studio coursework. 

Discipline History (9 credits) 

Discipline history courses acquaint students with the historical 
framework of their respective majors. These courses provide a his- 
torical foundation and mark the intersection of professional training 
and liberal arts education. The specific courses fulfiUing this 
requirement vary by college and major. 



Liberal Arts Distribution (21 credits) 

The liberal arts distribution requirement ensures that students 
have an opportunity to explore the literature, philosophy, institu- 
tions, and arts of their own and other cultures. Acquaintance with the 
humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences is essential for any 
educated person to understand the world, and provides a knowledge 
base for informing the creative endeavors of the artist. The specific 
distribution requirements are outlined in the section tided Division 
of Liberal Arts. 

Major (varies by program) 

Major requirements have been carefully designed by the faculty to 
provide the student a professional education in his or her chosen 
field of study. Refer to the appropriate section of the catalog for spe- 
cific major and departmental requirements. 

Free Electives (9 credits) 

Free electives play an important role in the University's mission 
of providing a dynamic milieu for creative exploration, innovation, 
and intellectual investigation, extending the practice and under- 
standing of the arts and the arts professions. They give the student 
the opportunity to explore subjects beyond those offered or required 
by the major department and encourage educational autonomy on 
the student's part. 

An elective is defined as any studio or liberal arts course, that is 
neither a requirement for the student's major nor a requirement for 
the University's liberal arts core. Electives are courses that a student 
can choose freely without restriction. While advisors may make rec- 
ommendations regarding electives, the final choice for elective 
courses must rest with the student. Obviously, prerequisites and 
corequisites apply to any course that a student may elect to take. 

Every major undergraduate program at the University contains at 
least nine credits of free electives. Please refer to the program 
requirements for further information on specific department require- 
ments; some programs have as many as 21 credits of electives built 
into the degree requirements. 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



Division of Liberal Arts 



Peter Stambler 

pstambler@uarts.edu 

Director ■ . 

215-717-6262 

In addition to the major requirements for earning a baclielor's 
degree at The University of the Arts, all undergraduate students are 
required to complete approximately one-third of their studies in the 
liberal arts, reflecting the University's conviction that the liberal arts 
are essential for the educadon of artists, designers, performers, and 
writers. The aims of the division are to develop students' powers of 
cridcal thinking and their understanding of the history and criticism of 
the creative arts, to introduce them to philosophic and scientific modes 
of thought, and to the study of human cultures and societies. In sum, 
we aim to refine students' percepdons of both their inner world and 
the outer worid and to help make them both intellectually responsible 
and creative. The Liberal Arts Division represents a common ground 
in the curriculum where students from all the colleges meet. It thus 
offers a unique forum for artistic and academic exchanges. 

Students are expected to meet with their advisors regularly and are 
responsible for knowing and fulfdling their liberal arts requirements. 



Transfer Credit Policy 
and Requirements 

New Students: 

The University of the Arts will accept, after review, transfer credit 
for liberal arts courses completed elsewhere provided that the 
coursework completed is determined to be equivalent to University 
of the Arts offerings, is from an accredited college or university, and 
a grade of "C" or better was earned. Students are required to present 
official transcripts of courses taken at other instituUons. as well as 
course bulledns in order for evaluation of transfer credits to take 
place. Contact the Office of the Registrar for further informadon. 

Enrolled Students 

Once they have matriculated, students may transfer up to 15 
credits in the liberal arts, provided they have not already transferred 
that many or more at the dme of matriculation. Students who wish to 
take liberal arts credits at other colleges must secure prior written 
approval from the Director of the Division of Liberal Arts. Such 
courses may not duplicate courses already taken for credit at The 
University of the Arts. 

Credit-Hour Ratio 

Liberal arts credit is earned at the rado of 1 credit per class con- 
tact hour. 

University Writing Standards 

The faculty of the University have established a standard of pro- 
fessionalism for all formal papers written for liberal arts and studio 
courses. 

1 . Citarions of any text used must be documented as appropriate. 
The MLA and APA styles, as detailed in Diane Hacker's A Writer's 
Reference, are taught in First-Year Writing HU 1 10 A/B. Lack of 



knowledge of citation procedures will not be an acceptable explana- 
tion for plagiarism. 

2. Papers must be free of consistent patterns of error in punctua- 
tion and grammar and must be spell-checked and proofread. 

3. Papers must be word-processed and printed with appropriate 
margins. In addition, papers must be concepmally and visually 
divided into paragraphs as appropriate. 

Liberal Arts Requirements 



Common Core 




12 credits 


HUllOA/B 


First Year Writing 


6 credits 


HU 103 A/B 


Introduction to 






Modernism 


6 credits 



Discipline History (1 


3H) 




9 credits 


Majors in: 








Acting 


TH311A, 


TH311B, 


TH213 


Animation 


HU140A. 


HU140B, 


WM251 


Applied Theater Arts 


TH213. 


TH311A, 


TH311B 


Communication 


CM 250. 


CM 251, 


CM 260 


Crafts 


HU140A, 


HU140B, 


HU 253 


Dance 


DA 211 A, 


DA 21 IB, 


DA 117 


Film 


HU140A, 


HU140B, 


WM251 


Fine Arts (FT PR, SO 


HU140A, 


HU140B, 


Art History 
elective 


Graphic Design 


HU140A. 


HU140B, 


HU254 


Illustration 


HU140A. 


HU140B. 


Art History 
elective 


Industrial Design 


HU140A, 


HU140B, 


HU251 


Multimedia 


MM 271. 


six credits c 


:hosen from any 






Arts/Discipline History 


Music * 


Performance and Composition: 




MU301A, 


MU301B. 


MU401B 




Vocal: 








MU301A, 


MU301B. 


TH312A 


Musical Theater 


TH312A. 


TH312B. 


TH213 


Photography 


HU140A, 


HU140B. 


HU255 


Writing Film and TV 


HU320A, 


HU 320 B, 


WM 253 



Additional discipline history course required (MU 401 A) counts 
toward major requirements. 



Liberal Arts Distribution 




21 credits 


Social and Behavioral Sciences 


(SS) 


6 credits 


Natural Science and Mathematics 


(SCI/M) 


3 credits 


Literature 


(LIT) 


3 credits 


Humanities 


(HU) 


3 credits 


Liberal Arts Electives 




6 credits 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



Liberal Arts Distribution Requirements 

This grid shows how liberal arts courses may be used to satisfy 
the liberal arts distribution requirement. 



Key: LIT = Literature 




AH = Art History 




SS = Social Science 




SCI/M = Science/Math 




HU = Humanities 




DH = Discipline History 






Distribution 


HU130A French I 


HU 


HU130B French I 


HU 


HU131A German I 


HU 


HU131B German I 


HU 


HU132A Italian I 


HU 


HU132B Italian I 


HU 



HU140A Art History Survey I 

HU140B Art History Survey II 

HU 162 Individual and Society 

HU181A Child and 

Adolescent Psychology 

HU181B Adult Psychology 

HU 201 Lyric Poetry 

HU210A 19th C.American Writers 

HU 2 1 B 20th C. American Writers 

HU211 Women Writers 

HU 2 1 2 Introduction to Mythology 

HU213 World Drama 

HU216 The Short Story 

HU 2 1 7 African American Literature 

HU218 Super Heroes 

HU219 Children's Literature 

HU 22 1 Forms of Autobiography 



HU(DH/all CAD majors) 
HU(DH/all CAD majors) 

SS 



SS 
SS 

LIT 

LIT 
LIT 
LIT 
LIT 
LIT 
LIT 
LIT 
LIT 
LIT 

LIT 



HU230A 


French I 


HU 


HU 230 B 


French II 


. HU 


HU232A 


Italian I 


HU 


HU 232 B 


Italian 11 


HU 


HU240 


Ancient Art 


AH/HU 


HU241 


Medieval Art 


AH/HU 


HU242A 


Northern Renaissance Art 


AH/HU 


HU242B 


Italian Renaissance Art 


AH/HU 


HU243 


Baroque Art 


AH/HU 


HU244 


Mythology in Oriental Art 


AH/HU 


HU 245 A 


History of Western Arch. I 


AH/HU 


HU 245 B 


History of Western Arch. II 


AH/HU 


HU246 


19th Century Art 


AH/HU 


HU248A 


Film History 


HU(=WM25r) 


HU 248 B 


Issues in National Cinema 


HU(=WM252) 







Distribution 


HU250 


History of Sculpture 


AH/HU 


HU251 


History of Industrial Design 


AH/HU 


HU253 


History of Crafts 


AH/HU 


HU254 


History of 






Communication Design 


AH/HU (DH/GD) 


HU255 


History of Photography 


AH/HU 
(DH/Photo majors) 


HU259 


Listening to Music 


HU 



HU260A Human Origins and Primates SS 

HU260B Human Evolution SS 

HU 261 Observing Humans SS 

HU262A History of China SS 

HU262B History of Japan SS 

HU263 History of Italian Renaissance SS 

HU 264 Modem American History SS 



HU265 


Introduction to Folklore 


SS 


HU266A 


History of Classical Worid 


SS 


HU 266 B 


History of Medieval Europe 


SS 


HU267 


Introduction to 






Cultural Anthropology 


SS 


HU268 


Introduction to the Bible 


SS 


HU270 


Introduction to Aesthetics 


HU 


HU272 


Money Matters 


SS 


HU274 


Introduction to Philosophy 


HU 


HU281 


Dynamic Anatomy 


SCI/M 


HU282A 


Fundamentals of 






College Math. 


SCIM 


HU 282 B 


Calculus 


SCI/M 


HU283 


Probability 


SCI/M 


HU 285 A 


Life Sciences 


SCI/M 


HU 285 B 


Physical Sciences 


SCI/M 


HU286 


Science and P,seudoscience 


SCI/M 


HU288 


Introduction to Brain, 






Mind and Behavior 


SCI/M 


HU289 


Contemporary Issues in 






Life Sciences 


SCI/M 



HU 292 Introduction to 

Worid Religions SS 
HU 293 Dance and Expressive Culture HU 

HU 3 1 The Stories of Chekhov LIT 

HU311 Greek Drama LIT 

HU 3 1 3 Poetry Writing Workshop HU/LIT 

HU314 Literature and Film LIT 

HU315A Modem Drama LIT 

HU 315 B Contemporary Drama LIT 

HU316 American Playwrights LIT 

HU3I7 Romanticism LIT 
HU318 Literature of 

the Roman Empire LIT 



The University of the Ans Undergraduate .ind Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



Distribution 



Distribution 



HU320A Masterpieces- 
Western Tradition I 
HU320B Masterpieces- 
Western Tradition II 
HU 322 Scriptwriting 
HU 323 Arts Criticism 
HU 325 Fiction Writing 



LIT (DHAVFT majors) 

LIT (DHAVFT majors) 

HU/LIT 

HU 

HU/LIT 



HU 326 Contemporary Arts in America LIT 

HU342 Arts of China AH/HU 

HU343 Art of Venice AH/HU 

HU 344 Avant-Garde Cinema HU 

HU345 Modern Architecture AH/HU 

HU346 Folic Art and Architecture AH/HU 

HU 347 Arts of Africa AH/HU 

HU 348 American Art to 1 945 AH/HU 

HU 349 American Film Genres HU 

HU351 Electronic Video HU 

HU353A Impressionism AH/HU 

HU353B Post Impressionism AH/HU 

HU354 Women Artists AH/HU 

HU 355 Dada and Surreahsm AH/HU 

HU357 Modem Art AH/HU 

HU 359 Politics and the Media SS 



HU360A 
HU 360 B 
HU361 
HU362A 
HU 362 B 
HU363 
HU364 
HU 365 A 

HU 365 B 

HU366 
HU367 
HU368 
HU369 



Renaissance and Reformation SS 



Age of Enlightenment 
Islam: Religion and Culture 
American Civilization I 
American Civilization II 
Modem Culture 
Sociology of Art 
Latin American 
History and Culture 
Latin American 
History and Culture 
The City 

Eastern Religions 
Sociology of Politics 
Cultural Ecology 



HU370 Greek Philosophy 

HU 37 1 The American Suburbs 

HU 372 Continental Philosophy 

and Existentialism 

HU 373 Ethics 

HU 374 Personality and Creativity 

HU 377 Critical Theory and the Arts 

HU378 Psychology of Touch 



SS 
SS 
SS 
SS 
SS 
SS 

SS 

SS 
SS 
SS 
SS 
SS 

HU 

SS 

HU 
HU 

SS 

SS/HU 

SS 



HU381 Urban Wildlife SCI/M 

HU 382 Social Psychology SS 

HU383 Personality and Adjustment SS 

HU 384 Abnormal Psychology SS 

HU385 Concepts of Modern Physics SCI/M 

HU 386 Human Genetics SCI/M 

HU 388 Perception SCI/M 

HU 389 Evolution in 

Modern Perspecti\'e SCI/M 

HU 390 Mass Media SS 

HU 392 American Musical Theater HU 

HU 393 African American Culture SS/HU 

HU 394 Play, Performance 

and Literature HU 

HU410 The Uncanny LIT/HU 

HU 41 1 A Renaissance Literature LIT 

HU411B Shakespeare LIT 

HU412 Detective Film and Fiction LIT 

HU413 Literature and Film: 

From Text to Screen LIT 

HU414A Big Fat Famous Novel LIT 

HU414B European Novel LIT 

HU415A Modem Poetry LIT 

HU415B Contemporary Poetry LIT 

HU416 Contemporary Novel LIT 

HU417 Lyric LIT 

HU419 American Modernists LIT 

HU420 Major Writers LIT 

HU421 On the Nature of 

Poetry and Art LIT . 

HU 422 American Politics 

and Culture 1945-75 LIT/SS 

HU 423 Literature and Opera LIT 

HU 424 Latin American Literature LIT 

HU428 Portraits of the Artist LIT 

HU440 Wagner and the Ring Cycle HU 

HU 442 Abstract Expressionism AH/HU 

HU448A American Art Since 1945 AH/HU 

HU448B European Art Since 1945 AH/HU 

HU 449 Diashilev and the Ballet Russe HU 



HU450 


Arts of India 


AH/HU 


HU451 


Arts of Islam 


AH/HU 


HU452 


Topics in Design 


AH/HU 


HU 453 


Arts of Japan 


AH/HU 


HU456 


Major Artists 


AH^U 


HU462 


American Social Values 


SS 


HU463 


Middle East Art and Culture 


SS 


HU464 


Holocaust 


SS 


HU466 


Comparative Religion I 


SS 


HU467 


Comparative Religion II 


SS 


HU474 


Contemporary Philosophy 


HU 


HU 475 


Freud and Mahler 


HU 


HU478 


Aesthetics Seminar 


HU 



:rsity of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



23 







Distribution 


Key: LIT 
SS 

SCI/M 
HU 
DH 


= Literature 


HU480 
HU481A 
HU481B 
HU 483 
HU484 


Psychology of Creativity 

Physics 

Physics 

Theories of Personality 

Educational Psychology 


SS 

SCIM 
SCI/M 
SS 

SS 


- Social Science 
= Science/Math 
= Humanities 

- Discipline History 


HU492 
HU495 
HU497 


Vienna and Berlin 

Dante in the Modem World 

Women and Sex Roles 


HU 
LIT 
LIT 


' 




AE 549 


Program Design & Methods; 
Aesthetics/Art Critism 


HU 






CM 250 
CM 251 


History of Communication 
Communication Theory and 
Culture in the 20th Century 


SS 
SS 






CM 260 


Media Industries 


SS 






CM 293 


History of Documentary 


HU 






DA 117 


Survey of Music 


HU (DH/Dance majors) 






DA 211 A 
DA 21 IB 


Dance History I 
Dance History 11 


HU (DH/Dance majors) 
HU (DH/Dance majors) 






MM 271 


Survey of Multimedia 


HU 






MM 360 


Psychology of 
Human/Computer Interaction 


SS 






MU301A Music History I 
MU 301 B Music History II 
MU 306 History of Rock Music 


HU (DH/Dance majors) 
HU (DH/Dance majors) 
HU 






MU401A Jazz History 

MU 401 B American Music History 

MU402 World Music 


HU 

HU (DH/ Music majors) 

HU 


_ 


- 


MU411 

MU417A 

MU417B 


20th Century Music 
Opera Literature 
Opera Literature 


HU 
HU 
HU 




; ~ 


MU424 


Wagner and the Ring Cycle 


HU 






TH213 


Script Analysis 


HU (DH/Acting & 
MusTh majors) 







TH311A Theater History I 

TH311B Theater History II 

TH 3 1 2 A Musical Theater History I 

TH 3 1 2 B Musical Theater History II 

WM 25 1 Narrative Cinema I 

WM 252 Narrative Cinema II 

WM253 History of Television 



HU (DH/Acting majors) 
HU (DH/ Acting majors) 
HU (DH/MusTh majors) 
HU (DH/MusTh majors) 

HU (DH/Film & 
Anim Majors) 
HU (DH/Film & 
Anim Majors) 
HU 



2H 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



Liberal Arts Faculty 

|uan Sebastian Agudeio 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 

BA. MA. Southern Illinois University 

Steven Antinoff 

Senior Lecturer 

BA. MA. PhD. Temple University 

Jolin Bal<er 

Visiting Assistant Professor 
AB. Washington University 
STB. Gregorian University 
PhD. Brown University 

Yana Balson 

Senior Lecturer 

BA. Pennsylvania State University 

MA. Temple University 

Susan Barry 

Senior Lecturer 

BA. Nova Scotia College of Art 

and Design 
MA. University of Sussex 

Ann Ricliman Beresin 

Assistant Professor 
BA. Tufts University 
MEd. Harvard University 
PhD. University of Pennsylvania 

Steplien Berg 

Professor 

BA. State University of Iowa 

Donald Chant Bolin 

Senior Lecturer 

BS. Gettysburg College 

Gerard Brown 

Senior Lecturer 
BFA, Boston University 
MFA, School of the Art Institute 
of Chicago 

Tliomas Ceneri 

Senior Lecturer 

BA. SUNY Purchase 

MA. City College of New York 

Nancy Davenport 

Professor 

BA. MA. Bryn Mawr College 

PhD, University of Pennsylvania 



Jacl< DeWitt 

Professor 

BA. Northeastern University 

MA, PhD. University of Connecticut 

Mary Ellen Didier 

Senior Lecturer 

BA. University of Wisconsin 

MA. University of Chicago 

Samuel Durso 

Assistant Professor 

BA, MA, Temple University 

Richard Farnum 

Associate Professor 

AB. Princeton University 

PhD. University of Pennsylvania 

Kevin Finn 

Senior Lecturer 

BA. Wilkes University 

MA. University of Delaware 

Janet Fishman 

Senior Lecturer 

BA, Brandeis University 

MA, Villanova University 

Eileen Flanagan 

Senior Lecturer 

BA, Duke University 

MA, Yale University 

Cheryl Floyd 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 
BA. Chestnut Hill College 
MA, PhD, Temple University 

Nancy Heller 

Professor 

AB, Middlebury College 

MA. PhD. Rutgers University 

Eugene Howard 

Senior Lecturer 

BA, Antioch University 

MA, Norwich University 

JamerHunt 

Associate Professor 
BA, Brown University 
PhD, Rice University 

Johnjernigan 

Senior Lecturer 

BA, Swarthmore College 

MA, Temple University 



Elisejuska 

Senior Lecturer 

BA, Bowdoin College 

MA. University of New Hampshire 

Anne Karmatz 

Adjimct Associate Professor 
BA, University of Pittsburgh 
MS, University of Pennsylvania 
MA, Villanova University 

Anita Lam 

Adjimct Assistant Professor 
BA, Beaver College 
MA, Temple University 

Cris Larson 

Senior Lecturer 

BFA, Rhode Island School of Design 

MFA. Rutgers University 

Sharon Lefevre 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 
BA, Princeton University 
MA, MPhil, Columbia University 

Mary Martin 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 
BA. Macalester College 
MA. Washington University 

Mara Miller 

Senior Lecturer 
BA. Cornell University 
MA. University of Michigan 
PhD. Yale University 

Slavko Milekic 

Associate Professor 

M. Sc„ MD Belgrade University. 

Yugoslavia 
PhD, University of Connecticut 

Chris Myers 

Associate Professor 

BA. University of Toledo 

MFA. Yale University 

Stewart Netsky 

Adjunct Associate Professor 
BS, Drexel University 
MA, Philadelphia College Art 
MFA, Tyler School of Art 

Paul Nolan 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 

BA. Shenandoah Conservatory of Music 

MA. Hahnemann University 



The University of liie Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



25 



Martin Novelli 

Adjunct Professor 
BS, St. Joseph's University 
MA, Purdue University 
PliD, JD, Temple University 

Charles F. Pennacchio 

Associate Professor 

BA, University of California, Berkeley 

MA, PhD, University of Colorado 

Andrew Petto 

Associate Professor 
BA, Middlebury College 
MA, PhD, University of Massachusetts, 
Amherst 

Steve Reeder 

Senior Lecturer 

BA, West Chester University 

MA, Villanova University 

Robin Rice 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 
BFA, Ohio Wesleyan University 
MA, University of Missouri 

Catlierine Robert 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 

BA, Connecticut College for Women 

MA, PhD, University of Pennsylvania 

William Rudolph 

Senior Lecturer 

BA, University of Nebraska, Lincoln 

MA, University of Virginia 

Sid Sachs 

Senior Lecturer 

BFA, Tyler School of Art 

MFA. Rutgers University 

Mil<hall Sergeev 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 
BA, Moscow State University 
MA, PhD, Temple University 

Martha Shaw 

Senior Lecturer 
BA. Smith College 

Kiernan Slater 

Senior Lecturer 

BA, Davidson College 

MA, Georgetown University 

Frank Smigiel 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 
BA, University of Pittsburgh 
MA, PhD, University of Delaware 



David Spolum 

Senior Lecturer 
BSS, Cornell College 
MA, Temple University 

Noah Brodie Spring 

Senior Lecturer 

BA, Yale University 

MFA, University of Southern California 

Peter Stambler 

Director of Liberal Arts 

Professor 

BA, Yale University 

MFA. Carnegie-Mellon University 

PhD, Syracuse University 

Andrew Stein 

Senior Lecturer 

BA, Grinnell College 

MA, PhD, Indiana University 

Patricia Stewart 

Adjunct Associate Professor 
BA, University of Pennsylvania 

DenaSukol 

Senior Lecturer 

BA, JD, Temple University 

Fabian Ulitsky 

Associate Professor 

BA, MEd, Temple University 

PlppaVanderstar 

Master Lecturer 

AB, Princeton 

MA, New York University 

MPhil, Oxford University 

DPMI, Oxford University 

Judith Vassallo 

Adjunct Professor 

BA. American International College 

MA, University of Pennsylvania 

Susan T. Viguers 

Professor 

BA, Bryn Mawr College 

MA, University of North Carolina 

at Chapel Hill 
PhD, Bryn Mawr College 

Pierre Vilain 

Senior Lecturer 
BA, Tufts University 
MA, New York University 
PhD, University of Pennsylvania 



Stanley Ward 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 

BA, Duke University 

MA, PhD, Harvard University 

Faith Watson 

Master Lecturer 

BA, MA, University of Pennsylvania 

Carla Weinberg 

Adjunct Associate Professor 

Dottore in Lingue, University of Pisa 

Burton Weiss 

Adjunct Professor 

BA, MA, PhD, Princeton University 

TobyZinman 

Professor 

BA, MA, PhD, Temple University 



26 



The University of the Arts Undergradu 



nd Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 











Coaege of ^ 
Art and Design ^ 


1 




Undergraduate and Graduate 
Course Catalog 
2003 • 2004 



i/) 







The University 
OF THE Arts® 



College of Art and Design 'viajor Areas of study 



Stephen Tarantal, Dean 

starantal@uarts.edu 
Adrienne Stalek, Assistant Dean 

astalek@uarts.edu 
215-717-6120 

The College of Art and Design is a comprehensive visual arts col- 
lege oifering a full range of undergraduate and graduate programs in 
fine arts, crafts, design, media arts, art education, and museum com- 
munication and education. Micrograms are dedicated to the 
development of the individual artistic spirit and vision within each 
student; the study of the historical and contemporary precedents that 
have shaped our culture; and the full range of analog and digital 
methods and processes that give form to the visual arts. 



The College offers coursework toward the BFA, BS, MFA, MA, 
MAT, or MID degree with major programs in; 
Bachelor of Fine Arts 

Animation 

Crafts (Ceramics, Fibers. Metals, and Wood) 

Film/Digital Video 

Graphic Design 

Illustration 

Painting and Drawing 

Photography 

Printmaking/Book Arts 

Sculpture ■ . , . 

Bachelor of Science 

Industrial Design 

The College also offers the following graduate degree programs: 
Master of Art 

Art Education 

Museum Communication ^ . ; 

Museum Education 
Master of Art in Teaching 

Visual Arts 
Master of Fine Arts 

Book Arts/Printmaking 

Ceramics 

Museum Exhibition Planning and Design 

Painting 

Sculpture 
Master of Industrial Design 

These special undergraduate and graduate programs are also 
offered; 
Special concentration in Art Therapy 
Pre-certification program in Art Education 
Post-baccalaureate certificate program in Crafts 

Class Size and Structure 

Each department is unique, with its own curriculum and structure, 
but in every department, classes are small and informal. Facuhy 
advisors and the generous student/faculty ratio assure close indi- 
vidual attention and assistance throughout a course of study. 

One of the important teaching modes in the college is the critique, 
or "crit." an evaluation of student work by the instructor with the 
participation of the class. Given informally to the class or individual 
as often as once a class, crits have proven to be an invaluable method 
for the development of critical thinking and self-awareness, which 
are major educational goals in our programs. 



Credit-Hour Ratio 

In general, credit is earned at the ratio of one credit for two class- 
contact hours in studio courses. Please refer to the course 
descriptions for specific informafion. 

Return Degree Program 

Diploma graduates of the Philadelphia College of Art may apply 
credits earned for the diploma toward the University's baccalaureate 
requirements. For additional information and to apply, contact the 
Office of the Registrar. 



28 



The University of the Ans Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



Exhibition Program 

The Exhibition Program showcases major contemporary exhibi- 
tions related to the University's diverse academic curricula in 
design, crafts, and the fine arts. 

Over the years, the Rosen wald-Wolf Gallery, the University's pri- 
mary exhibition space, has attracted national and international artists 
to the campus. Artists who have had one-person exhibitions in the 
gallery include Vito Acconci, Siah Armajani, Alice Aycock, Willie 
Cole. Gregory Crewdsen, Richard Fleishner. April Gomik. Lois 
Greenfield, Alex Grey, John Hejduk. Daniel Jackson. Barbara 
Kasten, Mel Kendrick. Jon Kessler, Donald Lipski. Henry Moore. 
Ree Morton, Robert Motherwell, Thomas Nozkowski, Ir\ing Penn, 
Anne and Patrick Poirer. Yvonne Rainer. Judith Shea, Pat Steir, 
Lenore Tawney, Paul Thek. George Trakas. and Lebbeus Woods. In 
addition, the gallery has presented notable historic exhibitions of 
design: Alexei Brodovich. Czech Cubism. Charles Eames. frogde- 
sign, and Memphis. 

Additional exhibition spaces in Dorrance Hamilton Hall Galleries, 
the Solmssen Court Gallery, and the Window on Broad furnish 
opportunities for faculty, alumni, students, and regional talents. 
Nearly every department also launches its own series of exhibits. 
The galleries in Media Arts, The Mednick and 1401 . the Painting/ 
Drawing Gallery, the Printmaking Gallery, the Richard C. von Hess 
Illustration Gallery, and the Ceramics/Sculpture Gallery all show 
work of emerging and established artists. Student-run invitational and 
juried exhibitions in Gallery One give students the experience of 
installing shows. Museum Exhibition Planning and Design MFA stu- 
dents gain experience and skills from their practical work in the 
galleries. Highlights of the year are the Annual Student Show, a fea- 
tured Commencement event, the Student Scholarship Exhibition, and 
Senior Student and Master of Fine Arts exhibitions. 

Special Facilities 

Anderson Hall is a nine-story visual arts facility that houses a spa- 
cious gallery, studios, classrooms, and a library designed with a 
feeling of openness. Through the combination of Anderson Hall. 
Dorrance Hamilton Hall, and the Terra Building, the University pro- 
vides a wealth of modem studios, shops, labs, equipment, galleries, 
and libraries to support the making of art. 

The variety of studios and equipment is extensive, ranging from 
woodworking and metal shops, printmaking and computerized type- 
setting shops, to fine arts, crafts and design studios, and photo, film, 
and digital imaging labs. Four large kilns enhance ceramic-making 
capabilities and a forge has been built for sculpture. A large weaving 
shop is complete with dozens of looms and a dyeing room. A 19th 
century carriage house was converted into a skylit figure-modeling 
studio for sculpture students. 

Digital Technology/Electronic Media 

Advances in digital technologies have established the computer as 
an essential tool for creative work. Artists, designers, and performers 
will increasingly be responsible for the development of new digital 
media. These advances are creating a wealth of job opportunities for 
individuals with creative talent that is unparalleled in the history of 
the arts. 

Since 198 1 , The University of the Arts has been a leader in the 
field of computer-mediated art and design education in the Northeast 
region. The University has carefully integrated new media technolo- 
gies into traditional fields of study within art and design disciplines. 



Additionally, the Electronic Media Department offers studio elecrive 
courses in computer concepts, virtual sculpture, digital multimedia, 
and electronic media production, at introductor)'. intermediate, and 
advanced levels for all students regardless of their major. UArts 
remains dedicated to continuing this leadership role of preparing 
students for career opportunities in traditional and electronic media. 

Typography/Imaging Lab 

The Imaging Lab is a fully equipped pre-press and output facility 
that accommodates Book Arts, The Borowsky Center for Publicafion 
Arts, Graphic Design, Illustration, Media Arts, and Printmaking, 
among many other departments. We have a traditional darkroom 
with three copy cameras, two enlargers. and one contact frame. Non- 
silver classes do all their darkroom work in this facility. The output 
center houses a Dolev 400 image-setter, film processor. Cannon 
CLC 900 color fiery printer, HP large-format six color printer, and 
three Macintosh workstations. We process film and color output for 
student work and departmental needs. Students are able to work in 
the lab under technicians and learn the workings of pre-press and 
high-end digital output. Imaging workshops are held with classes in 
the lab, as well as one-on-one consultations with students in the final 
stages of creative digital work for critiques, portfolios, and thesis 
exhibitions. 

Media Arts Studios 

The Media Arts Department (photography/film/digital video/ ani- 
mation) provides students with high-end equipment and studios 
modeled after professional environments. Media Arts houses two 
Master Series Oxberry animation stands, as used by Disney and 
other professional firms, to film animation drawings, which enable 
students to produce professional-quality work. In addition. Media 
Arts digital facilities include three AVID digital video editing sys- 
tems, a state-of-the-art Windows XP Professional computer 
animation lab, and a 16-station closed-loop color-calibrated digital 
imaging computer lab. Media Arts also houses two animation 
shooting studios, a specially built and acoustically isolated film 
shooting studio, two fully equipped digital sound studios, five 
flatbed film editors, as well as video editing, a Casablanca editing 
system, splicers, synchronizers, and projectors. 

Other Media Arts facilities include state-of-the-art high-venUla- 
tion darkrooms with 55 4x5 enlargers, a black-and-white RC print 
processor, a color darkroom with 14 individual stations and a 32" 
RA-four color print processor, and four photography shooting stu- 
dios with all the essential equipment for studio photography. 

The Media Arts Equipment Room serves student needs by 
checking out animation, film, and photography equipment, 
including lights, cameras, tripods, animation discs, and sound equip- 
ment. The Equipment Room is open seven days a week and offers 
extended hours on weekdays. 

Digital Imaging Lab 

The Media Arts Department Digital imaging Lab is a unique 
facility built to support high-resolurion digital imaging and digital 
video. The lab has 16 Apple Macintosh G4 computers, equipped 
with one gb of RAM, dual high-capacity hard drives, dual 21 -inch 
Color Calibrated Apple Studio Display monitors for each cpu. Ultra 
SCSI cards, DVD-RAM, and Fire Wire CD-RW drives. Each station 
has an Epson 2450 Fire Wire flatbed scanner, and an Wacom Intuos 
9x12 tablet. There are a number of Polaroid and Minolta Film 
Scanners, and an Agfa T2500 Digital Pre-Press scanner. For output. 



The University of the Art.s Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



29 



there are a number of devices including a Tektronix Phaser 780 
color laser printer, a Fuji Pictrography 3500 Digital Printer, a Xante 
Tabloid Laser Printer, a Polaroid Pro-Palette 8045 8K film recorder, 
and a Hewlett Packard 5000PS wide-format digital Inkjet printer, 
with both dye- and pigment-based inks. The lab also has two Pro- 
Tools XP systems, 1 7 Panasonic DV 1 000 digital video decks and a 
Sony DSR-40 digital video deck. The lab is managed by an Apple 
OS X server, with more than one terrabyte of storage to facilitate the 
requirements of a modem digital workflow. The lab is available to 
students majoring in a Media Arts program, or enrolled in specifi- 
cally designated Media Arts courses. 

Computer Animation Lab 

The Media Arts Department Computer Animation Lab is a lab 
designed solely for computer animation. It features 16 IBM Dual 
Intel XEON processor workstations running Windows XP 
Professional, with Softimage XSI 3.0. Maya for 3-D animation, and 
Adobe Premiere, After Effects, Illustrator, and Photoshop for 2-D 
work. Digital Audio is handled by Sound Forge and Pro-Tools, and 
there is also a Macintosh OS X system for Fire Wire output to the 
Sony DSR-40 Digital Video Deck. Each system is designed specifi- 
cally for animation, and has a Wacom Tablet, a dedicated Fire Wire 
scanner, CD-RW drives, and a DVD and RW drive. Digital output is 
handled by three DPS Perception systems, a Sony Beta deck, a 
Panasonic SVHS deck, a Sony Digital Video Deck, and a DVD 
burner. The lab also has a Tektronix Phaser 780 color laser printer 
for output of animation stills. The lab is managed by a dedicated 
IBM Fibre Channel server running Windows 2003. 

Digital Audio Sound Studios 

The Media Arts Department houses two state-of-the-art Digital 
Audio Sound Studios. They are based around two Pro-Tools 24 Mix- 
TDM systems, each with a Mackie 16x8x2 Mixing Console, a 
Tascam 234 4-track Cassette Recorder, a Tascam 1 22 Stereo 
Cassette recorder, two Neutrik 48 pt. patch bays, a Yamaha SPX900 
Sound Processor, an Apple Macintosh G4 with a 17-inch monitor, 
DVD-RAM, Fire Wire CD-RW Drive. Tascam DA60 DAT recorder, 
and a USD Sync Controller. Both rooms can record from the Film 
Studio, or an Isolation Booth with microphones, foldback, and direct 
instrument connection. 

The facilities also inclde three AVID Express Deluxe (v.5.7) suites 
running Windows 2000 Professional on Compaq W8000 2.8ghz, 
512 RAM Computer Systems with Dual Stream Uncompressed 
video, Meridien III Board Set, Son Beta UVW01800 video deck, 
JVC BR-5800 SVHS video deck, mackie mixer, and dual 21 -inch 
Sony Trinitron Monitors, complemented by three Final Cut Pro 
video editing Workstations. Twi Apple XServe Dual Processor sys- 
tems, one Dual Processor Apple G4 system. Each suite includes 
DigiDesign ProTools 001 software and Hardware, Sony DSR 1 1 DV 
Decks, and 20-inch flat panel displays. 

Media Arts Department Dub Room 

The Media Arts Dub Room allows conversion of audio and video 
media to differing formats. The following components are supported 
through track-mounted patch bays for dupes of conversion. Sony 
Beta UVW-1800 video deck, JVC BR-5800 SVHS video deck, 
Mackie 12 channel mixer, Elmo TRV-16 Film Transfer unit, Otari 
1/4-inch half-track studio editing deck. Tascam 122 Stereo Cassette 
Deck, Yamaha DVD Player, Panasonic AGW3 Multi-Sandard VHS 
deck, Tascam DA60 Studio DAT recordcer, Tascam MDl Minidisk 



deck, Technicx Turntable, Magnasync 16 mm magnetic film 
recorder, Nagra 4.2 tape deck, two Sony UMatic 3/4-inch video 
decks, and a Tascam Patch Bay. 

Borowsky Center for Publication Arts 

The Borowsky Center for Publication Arts is both a unique educa- 
tional arm of the University and a printing facility that provides 
students, staff, faculty, and visiting artists a resource to explore the 
creative potential inherent in the offset lithographic printing 
medium. The Center enables qualified users to experience the com- 
plete graphic arts process from initial conceptualization through 
production, while maintaining the highest printing standards. The 
Center is equipped with state-of-the-art equipment, including a 
Heidelberg Kors 19" x 25" offset press, a Dos flatbed horizontal 
camera, a darkroom for shooting and developing negatives, and 
platemaking and stripping facilities. Staffed with two master printers 
and student assistants, the Borowsky Center produces a wide variety 
of printed material including posters, catalogs, brochures, announce- 
ments, and limited edition prints. The Center's Fact Sheet, which 
includes all procedures for project submittal, is available in the CAD 
Dean's office. 



30 



The University of the Ails Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



Undergraduate Programs 



All freshman students enter the 18-credit Foundation core pro- 
gram that includes courses in drawing, two-dimensional design, 
three-dimensional design, and time-motion studies. The Foundation 
program introduces the basic language and processes of the visual 
arts and prepares the students for entry into a major department. 
Through freshman elective course offerings, students are introduced 
to major course options and opportunities offered by the College of 
Art and Design. 

In the sophomore year, students select a major from one of the 
following departments: 

Crafts: (Ceramics, Fibers, Metals, Wood) 

Fine Arts: Painting and Drawing, 

Printmaking/Book Arts, Sculpture 

Graphic Design 

Illustration 

Industrial Design 

Media Arts: Animation, Film/Digital Video, Photography 
The major program is augmented by required and elective courses 
in other departments in CAD, CPA, and CMAC to encourage an 
awareness of the productive interaction that can occur between the 
many disciplines available at the University. Alternative career 
opportunities tire often developed by students stimulated by courses 
outside their major. 

The college cuiTcntly offers three concentrations and seven minor 
programs that can augment or complement the student's major 
course of study. 

Many departments offer internships and practicums to study off- 
campus during the junior and senior years. Frequent field trips to 
museums, galleries, artists* studios, and design .studios in 
Philadelphia, New York, and Washington, D.C., supplement their 
regular work in studios and workshops. 

Academic Advising 

Academic advising at the University is designed to provide max- 
imum information and assistance to students from the time they 
enter the Foundation program in their freshman year until they com- 
plete their final .semester as seniors. 

In the Foundation year, each student is assigned to a Foundation 
section with its own advisor. Each student is required to meet with 
the advisor at least once each semester and is encouraged to seek out 
the advisor as soon as any difficulties begin to occur. 

At the end of the Foundation year, when the student selects and 
enters one of the major departments, the student is assigned to a fac- 
ulty member who teaches in that department. This faculty member 
serves as that student's advisor for the next three years. Each student 
meets with his or her advisor at least once a semester to discuss the 
student's acadeinic program. 

In addition, there are two formalized advising sessions: 

1 . Second semester, freshman year: When students enter a major 
department, the advisor meets in small groups (four to five students) 
to orient them to collegiate and departmental academic requirements 
and standards, departmental expectations, elective options and 
opportunities, program strategies, two-year planning, and office 
hours; 

2. Second semester, junior year: Individual meetings to review 
progress, plan final year (both semesters), and review graduation 



requirements. Students may request a degree audit from the Office 
of the Registrar at any time. 

Transcript copies of student records are supplied on request to 
faculty advisors by the Registrar following the recording of grades 
each semester. 

Credit Distribution 

The student is ultimately responsible for completion of all course 
requirements for the degree program in which he/she is enrolled. 
The College requires a minimum of 123 credits for graduation (126 
for the BS in Industrial Design). A student carrying an average of 
15.5 credits per semester would be making normal academic 
progress toward graduation. 

The seneral credit structure for the BFA is as follows: 



Courses 

Foundation 

Major department credits 
Studio Elective 
Liberal Arts 


Credits 

18 

42 
21 

42 


Total credits 


123 



Studio Electives 

• Major studio departments may require up to six credits in 
another studio major, and/or Liberal Arts. 

• Students may elect to replace up to six studio elective credits 
with Liberal Arts courses. 

• Students are required to take at least nine credits of studio elec- 
tive courses outside of their major program. 

• Elective studio credits may be completed in any department at 
the College of Art and Design, the College of Performing Arts, or 
the College of Media and Communication. 

Major Program Requirements 

The professional orientation and preparation of the College of Art 
and Design's undergraduate major degree programs require students 
to achieve beyond the University's minimum academic standards. 

Students must achieve a grade of "C" or better in all College of 
Art and Design major course requirements and any required courses 
in other departments, including a discipline history if applicable. 

Students who receive a grade of "C-" or lower in a required 
major course must repeat the course. The degree requirement for 
that student will be increased by the number of credits that must 
be repeated. 

Students who receive "C-" or lower grades in major courses are 
required to schedule an appointment with the chair of their depart- 
ment during the first week of classes of the semester immediately 
following the .semester in which the "C-" or lower grade was 
received. After advising with the chair, students must adjust their 
schedule accordingly during the Drop/Add period. 

A student who receives more than one grade of "C-" or lower in 
required major courses in a given semester will be reviewed by the 
Academic Review Committee and placed on academic censure, even 
if the student's GPA is above 2.0. 

An excessive number of grades of "C-" or lower in major course- 
work may result in dismissal. Students who are unable to achieve 
minimum grades in major coursework are advised to speak with 
their advisor and consider transferring to another major. 



The University of the Aits Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



31 



The Art Therapy and Education concentrations are special courses 
of study that are offered in conjunction with the studio major pro- 
grams. Interested students should refer to the program requirements 
of those concentrations. 

Every student must have the approval of his or her department to 
proceed to the next level of coursework. Advising is a shared respon- 
sibility between the department and the student. Each must remain 
informed about the student's progress toward graduation. Finally, the 
student's petition to graduate must be approved by the department 
advisor or chairperson in consultation with his/her faculty. 

CAD Minors/Concentrations 

The College of Art and Design offers minors and concentrations 
that enable a student to focus on a specific discipline through organ- 
ized electives. Students wishing to include a minor or concentration 
are governed by the following guidelines: 

1 . A student may not take a major and a minor or concentration in 
the same subject. Minors must be taken in a program other than the 
major. 

2. Courses applied to the minor or concentration may not be used 
for the major, but students may include this coursework as part of 
their studio elective degree requirement. 

3. All minors require a minimum of 15 credits, which are defined 
by the department: generally, no substitution is allowed. 

4. Students must declare their intent to complete a minor or con- 
centration by filing the Minor Declaration Form in the Office of the 
Registrar. This form must be signed by the student's major and 
minor advisors. Once a minor or concentration is on file in the 
Registrar's Office, any changes must be discussed with the faculty 
advisor. 

5. A student pursuing a minor or concentration may be required to 
complete more than the minimum number of credits required for 
graduation. 

6. Minors and concentrations are available only to undergraduate 
students. 

7. Students wishing to pursue a minor or concentration must meet 
eligibility requirements, which may include satisfactory completion 
of foundation courses, prerequisites, and departmental portfolio 
review. 

Animation Minor, Media Arts Department 

This minor concentrates on the development of drawing skills that 
embrace a sense of timing and movement. The program also 
includes instruction in the basics of film and video technology. 
Film/Digital Video and Animation majors may not declare an 
Animation Drawing minor 



PF 2 1 A Introduction to Film I 

PF212A Introduction to Animation I 

PF 2 1 2 B Introduction to Animation II 

PF312A Junior Animation Workshop I 

PF 3 1 2 B Junior Animation Workshop II 



Book Arts Minor, Fine Arts Department 

This minor emphasizes the development of skills related to 
designing and creating books, incorporating both type and imagery. 
Instruction in image-making in multiples through printmaking 
processes, basic typesetting techniques, and introductory book- 
binding methods are studied. Fine Arts-Printmaking majors may not 
declare a Book Arts minor 



PR 201 Relief Monotype or 3.0 credits 

PR 204 Screenprinting - Etching 

PR 307 Book Arts: Concept and Structure 3.0 

PR 326 Introduction to Offset Lithography 3.0 

PR 425 Book Production 3.0 

PR 223 Bookbinding Methods 1.5 

PR 224 Book Arts Structures 1.5 

Figurative Illustration Minor, Illustration Department 

The focus of this minor is on work with the figure in space. Old 
master and traditional drawing and painting techniques are demon- 
strated and utilized as the student concentrates on the development 
of skills related to figurative drawing and painting. Illustration 
majors may not declare a Figurative Illustration minor. 



IL 200 A Pictorial Foundation 

IL 200 B Pictorial Foundation 

IL 202 A Figure Anatomy 

IL 202 B Figure Anatomy 

IL 303 Figure Utilization 



3.0 credits 

3.0 

3.0 

3.0 

3.0 



Film/Digital Video Minor, Media Arts Department 

This minor provides training in film and video technology. 
Students work on their own as well as in teams with other students. 
Animation and Film/Digital Video majors may not declare a 
Film/Digital Video minor 



PF2I0A 

PF210B 

PF3I0A 

PF320 

PF322 



Introduction to Film I 



3.0 credits 



Introduction to Film/Digital Video 3.0 

Junior Cinema Production I 3.0 

Sine-Sound for Narrative Film 3.0 
Experiments in 

Advanced Digital Video 3.0 



Narrative Video, Media Arts Department 

The minor in Narrative Video explores digital video as a medium 
for storytelling. It introduces students to various aspects of video 
production, including script writing, storyboarding, editing, sound 
design, directing, and producing. Students develop their skills as 
they advance from scene exercises through a short film to a final 
year-long project. This minor is open to all UArts majors, except 
those in Film/Digital Video. As this minor is co-hosted by the 
College of Media and Communications, CMAC students should 
refer to the CMAC section of this catalog for additional regulations 
regarding this minor 





One of the following: 




3.0 credits 


WM219 


Writing for Film 


3.0 


3.0 


CM 295 


Narrative Video 




3.0 




Production Workshop 


3.0 


3.0 


PF410A 


Senior Cinema Production I 


3,0 


3.0 


PF410B 


Senior Cinema Production II 


3.0 



One of the following: 

CM 120 Sound Communication 3.0 

PF 320 Sync-Sound for 

Narrative Film 3.0 



32 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



Photography Minor, Media Arts Department 

The Photography minor stresses a fine-art approach to photog- 
raphy. It provides the basics of black-and-white as well as color 
photography and digital imaging. The emphasis is placed on gaining 
experience in a wide range of pictorial photographic applications. 
Once a student has mastered basic photographic technique, materials 
and processes that are used to manipulate photographic imagery are 
explored. Creativity and personal expression are emphasized in all 
of these courses. Photography majors may not declare a 
Photography minor. 

PF 2 1 1 A Introduction to Photography I or 3.0 credits 

PF 209 Photography for Illustrators 

PF211B Introduction to Photography II 3.0 

PF217 Color Concepts 3.0 

PF 3 1 1 A Junior Photography Workshop 3.0 

PF 3 1 5 Digital Photography Workshop 3.0 

Studio Photography Minor, Media Arts Department 

This minor is designed to give the student mastery of the full 
range of camera formats from a 35mm small format up to a 4x5 
studio view camera. Technical training covers electronic strobe and 
tungsten studio lighting, as well as color transparency film and con- 
ventional black-and-white, and color photographic print materials 
and techniques. Advanced-level classes concentrate on design and 
creative approaches to staged and directed shooting. Photography 
majors may not declare a Studio Photography minor. 

GD 310 Photographies or 

PF 3 1 5 Digital Photography Workshop or 

PF 2 1 1 B Photography II 3.0 credits 

PF 2 1 1 A Introduction to Photography or 3.0 

PF 209 Photography for Illustrators 

PF217 Color Concepts 3.0 

PF 3 1 3 A Basic Photography Studio I 3.0 

PF 3 13 B Basic Photography Studio II 3.0 

Typography Minor, Graphic Design Department 

The student learns the basic visual grammar of typography, incor- 
porating this knowledge into information-based interpretations. 
Intermediate studies are concerned with the informational and edito- 
rial uses of typography, as well as multi-page formats. The advanced 
level develops a sophisticated expertise in solving complex mes- 
sages through typographic expression. Graphic Design majors may 
not declare a Typography minor. 

GD212 Typography Fundamentals 3.0 credits 

EM 201 Electronic Media/Production I 1.5* 

EM 202 Electronic Media/Production II 1.5** 

GD 306 A Typography Emphasis 3.0 * 

GD 306 B Typography Emphasis 3.0 ** 

GD 426 Advanced Typography 3.0 

* It is recommended that these two courses be taken concurrently, 
when possible. 

** It is recommended that these two courses be taken concur- 
rently, when possible. 



Digital Fine Arts Concentration, Electronic Media 
Department 

This concentration is designed for students grounded in tradi- 
tional two- and three-dimensional art and design principles who 
wish to incorporate digital tools and technology to create highly per- 
sonalized artistic statements. While conceptually and procedurally 
digitally based, the digital fine arts concentration provides for phys- 
ical output in two-, three- and four-dimensional realms as well as 
combined formats. Working closely with advisors, the student 
selects 15 credits from categories I and II, with a six credit minimum 
in each category. 

I. Imaging. Interactivity and Sound Options: 



EM 210 


Digital Multimedia 


3.0 credits 


PF216 


Computer Animation 


3.0 


PF315 


Digital Photo Workshop 


3.0 


MU149A 


Aural Concepts 


3.0 


MU415A 


Introduction to MIDI 


3.0 


PF218 


Creative Sound 


3.0 



II. Digital Expression and Output Alternatives: 
PR 412 Advanced Printmaking Media: 

Digital Applications 3.0 credits 

PR 425 Book Production 3.0 

PF322 Media Technology 3.0 

ID 425 Advanced Computer-Aided Design 1.5 

Art Education Pre-Certification Concentration, Art 
Education Department 

This concentration is designed to be taken in conjunction with a 
regular studio major in the CAD BFA program. In addition to 
meeting the requirements of a major studio department, students 
take courses in the Art Education Department, plus prescribed 
courses in liberal arts, photography, electronic media, and other 
studio areas. Please see the Art Education program description for 
additional information, requirements, and regulations. 

Art Therapy Concentration, Art Education/Art Therapy 
Department 

While enrolled in one of the BFA programs in CAD, students may 
also elect this concentration, which introduces them to the discipline 
of art therapy on the undergraduate level. Students take four desig- 
nated courses in psychology and behavioral science, which can also 
count toward the liberal arts requirements of their BFA program, and 
15 credits of art therapy courses, which are considered as studio 
electives. Please see the Art Therapy program description for addi- 
tional information, requirements, and regulations. 

Internships 

Crafts, Fine Arts, Media Arts, Illustration, and Design sponsor an 
internship course open to all CAD students regardless of their 
majors. Internships are voluntary and valuable. They reinforce and 
expand classroom theory and practice and allow the student to test 
possible career choices and get a feel for the workplace. Students 
applying for an internship must meet the following eligibility 
requirements: junior or senior level in a BS or BFA program, a 2.5 
cumulative grade-point average and be registered for no more than 
18 credits, including those from the Internship during the semester. 
No more than six Internship credits may be credited toward a BS or 
BFA degree. 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



33 



Each participating department has an Internship Faculty Advisor 
who is responsible for coordinating the internships, placing students 
with workplace sponsors, advising students on course requirements, 
and deciding on the final pass/fail grades. 

Students who are interested in pursuing an internship may obtain 
Internship information from their faculty advisor, the Career 
Services Office, or the Dean's Office in CAD. Students sign up for 
internships during the registration process. The internship course is 
graded on a pass/fail basis and carries three academic credits. 

Foreign and Summer Study Programs 

Foreign and summer studies are available through a number of 
programs hosted by other institutions. Interested students should 
meet with the chair of their major department to discuss the appro- 
priate program, timing, and feasibility of off-campus study. Those 
who choose to participate should contact the Registrar and Financial 
Aid Office for advising on transfer of credit and financing. 

Vermont Studio Center, Vermont 

The University of the Arts is the accrediting institution for the 
Vermont Studio Center and our students receive a discount on 
tuition charges. Interested students should contact the Office of the 
Dean for advising and the Office of Continuing Studies for registra- 
tion procedures. 

Cooperative Program with 
Philadelphia University 

An agreeriient between The University of the Arts and 
Philadelphia University (formerly Philadelphia College of Textiles 
and Science) permits a limited number of students in each institu- 
tion to register for a maximum of three undergraduate credits per 
semester at the sister institution without the payment of additional 
tuition. 

Students are limited to a total of six undergraduate exchange 
credits during their four-year enrollment at the home institution. 
Registration is available on a selective basis for qualified students 
and is restricted to courses not offered at the home institution. 

Interested students should contact the Office of the Registrar at 
215-717-6420 for additional infonnation and reoistration materials. 



Student Exchange 



Students in good standing from other institutions may attend the 
College for either one or two semesters on a full-time basis. To be 
eligible, a student must have completed the freshman year at the 
home institution and receive approval from the department chair of 
the major department in the College of Art and Design. In addition, 
the student must provide a letter from the dean of the home college 
granting permission to take courses at The University of the Arts 
and agreeing to accept those credits for credit at the student's own 
institution. All University expenses are the responsibility of the stu- 
dent. Inquiries should be addressed to the Office of the Dean at 
215-717-6120. 



Association of Independent Colleges of Art 
and Design (AICAD) Mobility Program 

The College of Art and Design at The University of the Arts is a 
member of the Association of Independent Colleges of Art and 
Design (AICAD). Students in good standing may .spend a semester 
(with a possible extension to two semesters on a space-available 
basis) as a guest at another member institution. Students remain 
matriculated at The University of the Arts, and with their advisor's 
prior approval will receive full credit for work done at one of the 
following cooperating institutions: 

Art Academy of Cincinnati 

Art Institute of Boston 

Art Institute of Southern California 

Atianta College of Art 

California College of Arts and Crafts 

California Institute of the Arts 

College for Creative Studies 

Cleveland Institute of Art 

Columbus College of Art and Design 

Cooper Union School of Art 

Corcoran School of Art 

Kansas City Art Institute " ■ 

Lyme Academy of Fine Arts 

Maine College of Art 

Maryland Institute, College of Art ■ 

Massachusetts College of Art 

Memphis College of Art 

Milwaukee Institute of Art and Design 

Minneapolis College of Art and Design 

Montserrat College of Art 

Moore College of Art and Design 

OregonCollegeof Art and Craft ' ' 

Otis College of Art and Design 

Pacific Northwest College of Art 

Parsons School of Design 

Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts 

Rhode Island School of Design 

Ringling School of Art and Design 

San Francisco Art Institute 

School of the Art Institute of Chicago 

School of the Museum of Fine Arts, 
Boston 

AICAD International Affiliates 

Alberta College of Art and Design 
Burren College of Art 
Emily Carr Institute of Art and Design 
Nova Scotia College of Art and Design 
Ontario College of Art and Design 

Students apply through their home institutions, which are respon- 
sible for the selection of participants. For further information, 
contact the Office of the Dean, 215-717-6120. 



34 



The University or the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



Foundation 
Program 



Diane Pepe 

dpepe@uarts.edu 
Michael Rossman 

mrossman@uarts.edu 

Co-Chairpersons 

215-717-6210 

The Foundation program in the College of 
Art and Design provides incoming freshmen 
with a year devoted to a basic understanding 
of principles and concepts in the visual arts. 
During the first semester, each student is a 
member of a Foundation section and takes 
three co-requisite courses: Two-Dimensional 
Design. Three-Dimensional Design, and 
Drawing. During the second semester, stu- 
dents select a minimum of nine credits 
(three co-requisite courses) from the four 
courses offered by Foundation: Two- 
Dimensional Design. Three-Dimensional 
Design, Drawing, and Time and Motion. 
Each class meets for three hours, twice a 
week. 

Each section of students is taught by a 
team of faculty members who are profes- 
sionals in their various fields of art and 
design; many hold the ranks of Professor 
and Associate Professor In Foundation 
courses, faculty members stress not only the 
independent qualities of a discipline, but 
also its interdependent character Through 
these basic studies and their interactions, 
students discover the underlying values and 
principles important to all visual arts. 

Classroom work is enriched by home 
assignments, critiques and reviews, guest 
artists, films, slides, and class trips. One fac- 
ulty member from each section's team is 
designated as the advisor to that section. 
Students meet individually with the advisor 
to discuss concerns, the registration process, 
and their choice of major 

The student chooses an additional course 
offered by the major studio departments 
each semester These elective courses are 
designed to acquaint the student with the 
practices of the major studio areas. Students 
also register for two Liberal Arts courses in 
each semester, as required by the University 
core. 



Midyear Admission 

In addition to the typical September start 
date, students may also enter midyear and 
begin the Foundation Program in January. 
The department schedules first-semester 
core courses during the spring semester, and 
a seven-week, nine-credit, intensive second 
semester between mid-May and the end of 
June. Midyear admits who successfully 
complete the two-semester Foundation 
Program between January and June can 
enter their major program of study in the 
fall of the same calendar year in which they 
entered the program. 

Facilities 

In addition to the numerous multipurpose 
studios used by Foundation students for 
their regular class activities, the Foundation 
program provides other facilities to support 
and enrich studio projects. 

The Foundation Department has a Mac- 
based digital media lab and a compliment of 
analog and digital video cameras. This 
facility is used by all classes and can be 
accessed by students to execute projects in 
Two-Dimensional Design, Three- 
Dimensional Design, and Time Motion. 

The Foundation Shop is used for all 
Three-Dimensional Design, and Time and 
Motion classes, and provides all Foundation 
students with the opportunity to work with a 
diversity of materials such as wood, metal, 
plastic, and stone. The Foundation Shop 
houses a wide range of power equipment, 
including band saws, scroll saws, sanders, 
table saws, chop saws and other power 
tools. The Shop is monitored by a full-time 
Shop Supervisor and is open from 8 a.m. to 
4 p.m. Monday through Friday. 

The Nature Lab (the Visual Resource 
Center) contains an extensive selection of 
natural and man-made objects that serve as 
sources for research that enhances and com- 
plements the educational experience. The 
Nature Lab is used frequently by all 
Drawing classes. It is also well utilized by 
Three-Dimensional and Two-Dimensional 
Design classes. Some of the many objects in 
our collection include rocks, minerals, 
animal skeletons such as birds, cats, and tur- 
tles, human skeletons and skulls, plant 
forms, seashells. sea horses, coral, horse- 
shoe crabs, taxidermy reptiles, bats, frogs, 
and more. Students are invited to use the 
Nature Lab in addition to their scheduled 
class time. 



The full-time freshman student is typi- 
cally scheduled for 16.5 credits each 
semester usually as follows: 



Foundation 


Credits 


Fall* 






FPllO 


Drawing 


3.0 


FPI20 


2-D Design 


3.0 


FP 130 


3-D Design 


3.0 




Electives 


1.5 


HUllOA 


First Year Writing! 


3.0 


HU103A 


Intro, to Modernism I 


3.0 


FallTotal 




16.5 


Spring ** 






Choose am 


three courses:*** 




FPlll 


Drawing 


3.0 


FP121 


2-D Design 


3.0 


FP131 


3-D Design 


3.0 


FP140 


Time and Motion 


3.0 



Electives 1 .5 

HUllOB First Year Writing II 3.0 

HU 103 B Intro, to Modernism II 3.0 

Spring Total 16.5 



Freshman Year Total 



33.0 



* Students entering the Foundation pro- 
gram through Midyear Admission will 
enroll in these courses for the spring 
semester 

** Students entering the Foimdation pro- 
gram through Midyear Admission will 
enroll in these courses for the Summer I 
semester. 

*** Under certain circumstances, stu- 
dents may take all four second-semester 
Foundation courses. 



Ttie University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



35 



Foundation Faculty 
David V. Berger 

Senior Lecturer 

BFA, The University of the Arts 
MFA, Pennsylvania Academy of the 
Fine Arts 

Lowell Boston 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 
BFA, The University of the Arts 
MFA, Cahfomia Institute of the Arts 

Bill Brown 

Senior Lecturer 

BA, Temple University 

MFA, Washington University 

Mark Campbell 

Associate Professor 

BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 

MFA, Mills College 

Charles Cooper 

Senior Lecturer 

BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 

MFA, Yale University . • 

MaddyGold 

Senior Lecturer 

BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 

MFA, Pratt Institute 

Eileen Goodman 

Adjunct Professor 
BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 
MFA, Tyler School of Art, 
Temple University 

Michael Grothusen 

Assistant Professor 
BFA, University of Kansas 
MFA, Tyler School of Art, 
Temple University 

Gerald Herdman 

Associate Professor 

Certificate, Cleveland Institute of Art 

MFA, University of Pennsylvania 

Debra Hoffman 

Lecturer 

BFA, Pennsylvania Academy of the 

Fine Arts 
MFA, Milton Avery Graduate School, 

Bard College 



Steven Jaffe 

Associate Professor 
BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 
MFA, Tyler School of Art, 
Temple University 

Elsa Johnson 

Professor 

BFA, Cooper Union 

MFA, University of Pennsylvania 

Niles Lewandowski 

Associate Professor 

BFA, Maryland Institute College of Art 

MFA, University of Pennsylvania 

David Love 

Senior Lecturer 

BFA, Columbus College of Art & Design 

MFA, Pennsylvania State University 

Larry Mitnick 

Associate Professor 
BArch, Cooper Union 
MArch, Harvard University 

Diane Pepe 

Adjunct Associate Professor • 
BFA, Carnegie Mellon University 
MFA, University of New Mexico 

Boris Putterman \ 

Associate Professor , 

Diploma, Cooper Union School of Art 
BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 
MFA, Indiana University 

Leo Robinson 

Master Lecturer 

BA, Howard University 

MFA, Cranbrook Academy of Art 

Michael Rossman 

Professor 

BID, MFA, Pratt Institute 

Karen Saler 

Associate Professor 

BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 

MFA, Maryland Institute College of Art 

Foundation Professors 
Emeritus 

EdnaAndrade 
Robert McGovern 
Richard Stetser 



36 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



Crafts 



James Makins 

jmakins@uarts.edu 

Chairperson 

215-717-6100 

The Crafts Department seeks to develop 
artists of originality and resourcefulness 
who can excel in the most competitive pro- 
fessional environment. Smdio experience is 
provided in four major craft areas: ceramics, 
fibers, metals, and wood. There are also 
offerings in glass and plaster to complement 
the curriculum. 

Each crafts area offers a balanced con- 
centration in both the technical and 
aesthetic aspects of the medium. While 
practical training and specialized skills are 
necessary for creative ability, the conceptual 
and expressive evolution of each student is 
the essential focus of the department. An 
ongoing study of the contemporary crafts 
movement is seen as an integral element for 
those involved in the program. The range of 
faculty in each area provides the student 
with exposure to a diversity of professional 
perspective and experience. 

Through an incisive and rigorous cur- 
riculum, the department prepares students 
for professional involvement in their craft. 

Upon graduation, students elect to 
become independent artists, teachers, or 
designers, or tlnd employment in industry. 
Individuals often combine these occupa- 
tions in order to meet their individual needs 
and goals. 



Crafts Faculty 

Sharon Church 

Professor "" - 

BS, Skidmore College 
MFA. School for American Craftsmen, 
Rochester Institute of Technology 

Maegan Crowley 

Lecturer 

BFA. The University of the Arts 

MFA, Cranbrook Academy of Art 

William Daley 

Professor Emeritus 

BA, Massachusetts College of Art 

MA, Columbia Teachers College 

Christopher Darway 

Senior Lecturer 

BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 

Larry Donahue 

Adjunct Associate Professor 
BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 
MA, The University of the Arts 

Rachel Fuld 

Lecturer 

BA, Oberlin College 

Alec Karros 

Visiting Assistant Professor 

BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 

MFA, Rhode Island School of Design 

Lucartha Kohler 

Senior Lectuivr 
Moore College of Art 
Carnegie Mellon University 

Jack Larimore 

Adjunct Associate Professor 
BS, Michigan State University 

Mi-KyoungLee 

Assistant Professor 

BFA, Dong-A University, Pusan, Korea 
MFA, The University of the Arts 
MFA, Cranbrook Academy of Art 

James Makins 

Professor 

BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 

MFA, Cranbrook Academy of Art 



Rod McCormick 

Professor 

BFA, Tyler School of Art, 

Temple University 
MFA, Rhode Island School of Design 

Pam Pawl 

Lecturer 

BS, Philadelphia College of Textiles 
and Science 

Judith Schaechter 

Adjunct Professor 

BFA, Rhode Island School of Design 

Anne Schaefer 

Lecturer 

BFA, Washington University 

Warren Seelig 

Distinguished Visiting Professor 

BS, Philadelphia College of Textiles 

and Science 
MFA, Cranbrook Academy of Art 

Patricia Siembora 

Lecturer 

BFA, MAT, The University of the Arts 

Lola Brooks Spier 

Lecturer 

BFA, State University of New York 
at New Paltz 

Lizbeth Stewart 

Associate Professor 

BFA, Moore College of Art 

Roy Superior 

Professor 

BFA, Pratt Institute 

MFA, Yale University 

Walter Zimmerman 

Assistant Professor 

BA, Pennsylvania State University 

Certification in Art Therapy 

MFA, Rochester Institute of Technology 



The University of the Ans Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



37 



Crafts 

Bachelor of Fine Arts 123 credits 



Media-Specific Course 
Offerings: 



Foundation 


Credits 


Junior 




Credits 


CR211A/B 














CR2I2A/B 


Fall 






Fall 






CR221A 


FPIIO 


Drawing 


3.0 


CR300A 


Projects II 


3.0 




FP120 


2-D Design 


3.0 


CRXXX 


Media-Specific Course 


3.0 


CR22IB 


FP 130 


3-D Design 


3.0 


CRXXX 


Media-Specific Course 
(300 level/advanced) 


3.0 


CR222 




Electives 


1.5 




Electives 


3.0 


CR227 


HUIIOA 


First Year Writing I 


3.0 


HU253 


History of Crafts 


3.0 


CR231A/B 


HU103A 


Intro, to Modernism 1 


3.0 








CR232 


Fall Total 




16.5 


Fall Total 
Spring 




15.0 


CR 241 A 
CR241B 


Spring 






CR300 B 


Projects II 


3.0 


CR242 


Choose any 


three courses: 




CRXXX 


Media-Specific Course 


3.0 


CR243 


FPlll 


Drawing 


3.0 




(300 level/advanced) 




CR245 


FP121 


2-D Design 


3.0 




Electives 


3.0 


CR249 


FP131 


3-D Design 


3.0 


HUXXX 


Liberal Arts 


6.0 


CR251 


FP140 


Time and Motion 
Electives 


3.0 
1.5 


Spring Total 




15.0 


CR252 
CR 253 








Junior Year Total 


30.0 




HUllOB 


First Year Writing II 
Intro, to Modernism II 


3.0 
3.0 








CR255 


HU103B 


Senior 






CR256 






16.5 








CR26I 


Spring Tota 


Fall 


















CR277 


Freshman Year Total 


33.0 


CR400A 


Projects III 


3.0 


CR278 








CRXXX 


Media-Specific Course 


3.0 










CR280 


Sophomore 






(300 level/advanced) 




CR28I 


Fall 








Electives 


3.0 


CR282 


CR200A 


Projects I 


3.0 


HUXXX 


Liberal Arts 


6.0 


CR283 


CRXXX 


Media-Specific Course 


3.0 


Fall Total 




15.0 


CR285 


CRXXX 


Media-Specific Course 


3.0 


Spring 






CR286 


HU140A 


Art History Survey I 


3.0 


CR400 B 


Projects III 


3.0 


CR287 


HUXXX 


Liberal Arts 


3.0 


CRXXX 


Media-Specific Course 


3.0 


CR299 


Fall Total 




15.0 




(300 level/advanced) 




CR322A/B 


Spring 








Electives 


6.0 


CR329 


CR200B 


Projects I 


3.0 


HUXXX 


Liberal Arts 


3.0 


CR331 


CRXXX 


Media-Specific Course 
Electives 


3.0 
3.0 


Spring Tota 




15.0 


CR332 
CR370A/B 








Senior Year Total: 


30.0 




HU140B 


Art History Survey II 
Liberal Arts 


3.0 
3.0 








CR37IA/B 


HUXXX 








CR380A/B 


Spring Tota 




15.0 








CR38IA/B 








Electives must mclude at least nine studio credits 


CR385A/B 


Sophomore 


Year Total 


30.0 


outside of the Crafts offerings. 




CR386 








CR999 



Liberal Arts Distribution 

Note all Liberal Arts courses are 3.0 credits. 



HUllOA/B 


3cr 


3cr 


HU103A/B 


3cr 


3cr. 


HU140A/B 


3cr 


3cr 


Literature 


3cr 




Humanities 


3cr 




Social Science 


3cr 


3 en 


Science/Math 


3 en 




Lib. Arts Electives 


3cr 


3 en 


HU 253 Histon of 


Crafts 


3 en 



Introduction to Throwing 

Introduction to Handbuilding 

Introduction to Fibers 

and Mixed Media 

Introduction to Color and the Loom 

Constructed Surface 

Experimental Costume Design 

Introduction to Glassblowing 

Stained Glass 

Body Adornment 

Introduction to Jewelry 

Introduction to Metalsmithing 

Jewelry Rendering and Design 

Art for the Body 

Enameling 

Introduction to Molding and Casting 

Plaster Wotkshop 

Ceramic Technology 

Large-Scale Handbuilding 

Ceramics 

Introduction to Wood 

Fabric Resists and Embellishment 

Fabric Printing 

Introduction to Metal Casting 

Introduction to Electroforming 

Metal Furniture 

Small-Scale Steelworking 

Introduction to Furniture 

Wood Carving 

Low-Tech Furniture 

Selected Topics 

Advanced Fibers Mixed Media 

Advanced Texule Design 

Advanced Glassblowing 

Advanced Fusing and Stained Glass 

Advanced Throwing 

Advanced Ceramics 

Advanced Jewelry/Metals 

Advanced Metals 

Advanced Furniture 

Advanced Wood 

Independent Study 



38 



The University of the An.s Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



Crafts Curriculum 
Options 

The Crafts curriculum has been designed 
to give the student flexibihty in his or her 
choice of media concentrations. Some stu- 
dents may enter the Crafts Department 
knowing the specific medium in which they 
wish to concentrate. Other students may elect 
to divide their media-specific coursework 
between two areas of potential concentration. 
Still others may want to pursue a mixed 
media approach to their Crafts education. All 
are possible, but careful attention must be 
paid to meeting departmental, college, and 
University requirements while pursuing per- 
sonal interests. 

Of the 42 credits required for a Crafts 
major, 18 of these credits are devoted to the 
core of Project Courses. The remaining 24 
credits are to be taken elsewhere in the 
Crafts Department. However, it is important 
to note that 12 of those credits must be at 
the advanced (300-400) level. 

Core Studio Projects 
Courses 

Each semester all Crafts students take 
Projects, a core studio course. These courses 
provide aesthetic structure and involve dis- 
cussion and investigation of broader Crafts 
issues, with critiques of the student's work. 
Students then have the freedom to choose 
from a variety of technique-based courses, 
which aid in developing that aestheUc. 
Emphasis is placed on the interdependency 
of all the arts, with particular attention given 
to the unique contribution of Crafts ide- 
ology and pracfice. As a co-requisite for 
Projects, each student must be enrolled in at 
least one three-credit media-specific course 
in a major area of concentration: ceramics, 
fibers, jewelry, metalsmithing. and wood. 
These co-requisites must be at the appro- 
priate 200 or 300 level. Glass is currently 
offered as a department elective. 

Single Medium 
Concentration 

Students entering the department 
knowing the specific medium in which they 
wish to concentrate from sophomore 
through senior year take one three-credit 
media-specific course in that concentration 
each semester of the three-year journey 
through the department. Four media-spe- 
cific courses must be at the advanced level. 



Dual Concentration 

It is possible to ha\'e a dual concentration 
within the Crafts Department. If the stadent 
enters the sophomore year with an interest 
in two distinct media then, by taking the 
prerequisite of two courses at the 200 level 
early on. in the sophomore and junior years, 
the student can continue at the advanced 
level in these same two media during the 
junior and senior years. Two three-credit 
courses at the advanced level in each con- 
centration will fulfill the 12-credit advanced 
level requirement. 

Multiple Media 
Concentration 

It is possible to take courses during the 
sophomore and junior years in three or more 
media. However, this will require the 
greatest vigilance on the part of the student 
to meet all the requirements for graduation. 
Having sampled an array of introductory 
courses, the student must then take an addi- 
tional introductory course in at least one 
medium in order to proceed to the advanced 
level. To meet the advanced level require- 
ment as a multiple media student, it will be 
necessary to (a) take all 12 advanced credits 
in one medium or (b) use studio elective 
credits to take advanced level courses in 
additional media. 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



39 



Fine Arts 



Gerald Nichols 

gnichols@uarts.edu 

Chairperson 

215-717-6495 

The Fine Arts Department provides stu- 
dents an opportunity to explore both the 
common and diverse nature of the Fine Arts 
traditions of Painting/Drawing, 
Printmaking/Book Arts, and Sculpture. On 
the sophomore level, students are intro- 
duced to the media and concepts of all three 
disciplines. In the junior year, students 
choose a major from one of the above studio 
areas to develop personal authority and 
commitment within the discipline. The 
senior year is focused on advanced studio 
practice and performance in the major 
Upper-level Fine Arts seminars and studio 
classes are designed to foster an apprecia- 
tion of the shared purposes and goals of the 
contemporary fme artist. 

In addition to the major programs, 
the University offers a Digital Fine Arts 
concentration. See the listing of minors 
and concentrations for information 
on requirements. 

Having encountered a diversity of con- 
cepts, attitudes, and media, from charcoal to 
the computer. Fine Arts graduates find 
career opportunities as professional, 
exhibiting artists, curators and gallery per- 
sonnel, critics, mural and portrait painters, 
decorative artists, set designers, print- 
makers, bookbinders, paper and book 
conservators, graphic designers, commercial 
printers, mold-makers, commercial sculp- 
tors, cinemafic prop makers, special effects 
artists, and teachers at elementary, sec- 
ondary, and university levels. 



Painting/Drawing 

Gerald Herdman 

Coordinator 
215-717-6495 

The Painting/Drawing major provides a 
firm basis for students to develop a profes- 
sional involvement with their work. A 
balance is sought between the acquisition 
of studio skills and the development of a 
critical intelligence. 

Students are encouraged, through the 
rigor of studio activity, to understand the 
breadth of art in both its traditional and con- 
temporary forms, and to gain increasing 
authority in their own work. 

Courses evolve from the study of basic 
working methods and concepts to the refine- 
ments of personal vision and aesthetic 
judgment. In the final semester of the senior 
year, each student is required to complete a 
thesis project, which culminates in a formal 
presentation of a paper and an exhibition of 
a coordinated body of work. 

The faculty of pracficing professional 
artists represents a diversity of attitudes and 
ideals. Through the format of studio instruc- 
fion, dialogue, and critique, they seek to 
instill in each student a habit of self-instruc- 
tion, which will serve far beyond the 
program at the University. 

The Painting/Drawing Department pos- 
sesses its own gallery space where faculty, 
students, alumni, and invited artists have an 
opportunity to exhibit their work. 

Studio activity is augmented by lectures, 
symposia, seminars, visiting artists, and 
field trips to museums and galleries. 



Painting/ Drawing Faculty 

Eugene Baguskas 

Associate Professor 
BFA, Yale University 

Gerald Herdman 

Associate Professor 

Certificate, Cleveland Institute of Art 

MFA, University of Pennsylvania 

Sharon Horvath 

Assistant Professor 
BFA, The Cooper Union 
MFA, Tyler School of Art, 
Temple University 

Steven jaffe 

Associate Professor 
BFA. Philadelphia College of Art 
MFA, Tyler School of Art, 
Temple University 

David Kettner 

Professor 

BFA, Cleveland Institute of Art 

MFA, Indiana University 

Eileen Neff 

Adjunct Professor 
BA, Temple University 
BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 
MFA, Tyler School of Art, 
Temple University 

Gerald Nichols 

Professor 

Diploma, Cleveland Institute of Art 

MFA, University of Pennsylvania 

Boris Putterman 

Associate Professor 

Diploma, Cooper Union School of Art 
BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 
MFA, Indiana University 



40 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



Painting/Drawing 

Bachelorof Fine Arts 123 credits 



Foundatic 


>n Credits 


Junior 


Credits 


Fall 


Fall 






FPIIO 


Drawing 


3.0 


PT340 


Color Studies 


1.5 


FPI20 


2-D Design 


3.0 


FA 333 A 


Attitudes and Strategies 


3.0 


FP 130 


3-D Design 


3.0 


PT302A 


Junior Painting 
Electives 


3.0 
3.0 




Electives 


1.5 


HU XXX 


Liberal Arts 


6.0 


HUIIOA 


First Year Writing I 


3.0 


Fall Total 




16.5 


HU103A 


Intro, to Modernism I 


3.0 








Fall Total 




16.5 


Spring 












PT360 


Junior Seminar 


1.5 


Spring 






PT334 


Junior Drawing 


3.0 


Choose am 


three courses: 




PT 302 B 


Junior Painting 


3.0 


FPlll 


Drawing 


3.0 








FP121 


2-D Design 


3.0 


HUXXX 


Liberal Arts 


6.0 


FP131 


3-D Design 


3.0 


Spring Total 




13.5 


FP140 


Time and Motion 
Electives 


3.0 
1.5 


Junior Year Total 


30.0 
















Senior 






HU HOB 


First Year Writing II 
Intro, to Modernism U 


3.0 
3.0 








HU 103 B 


Fall 












PT402A 


Senior Painting 


4.5 


Spiing Tota 




16.5 














FA 424 A 


Drawing References 


1.5 


Freshman Year Total 


33.0 


FA 460 


Senior Fine Arts Seminar 


1.5 










Electives 


3.0 


Sophomore 




HUXXX 


Liberal Arts 


3.0 


Fall 






Fall Total 




13.5 


PT202A 


Sophomore Painting 


3.0 


Spring 






FA 222 A 


Drawing: Form and Space 


3.0 












PT402B 


Senior Painting 


6.0 


Choose one course from the following three*: 


FA 424 B 


Drawing References 


1.5 


SC201 


Sculpture I 


3.0 




Electives 


6.0 


PR 201 


Relief/Monotype 


3.0 


HUXXX 


Liberal Arts 


3.0 


PR 204 


Screen Printing/Etching 


3.0 














Spring Total 




16.5 


HU140A 


Art History Survey 1 


3.0 


Senior Year Total: 


30.0 


HUXXX 


Liberal Arts 


3.0 
15.0 








Fall Total 








Spring 






* Painting Majors must take one sculpture course 


PT 202 B 


Sophomore Painting 


3.0 


and one printmaking course. These will be counted 






as electives 


wtside of the Painting offerings. 


Choose 3.0 


redits from the following: 




Electives must include at least nine studio 


credits 


FA234 


Drawing Studies and 


1.5 


outside the Painting ojfering.s. 




FA235 


Media Techniques 


1.5 








FA 223 


Intro, to Figure Modeling* 


3.0 


Liberal Arts 


Distribution 




FA 205 


ConceptsAVorks on Paper* 


3.0 


Note all Liberal Arts courses are 3.0 credits. 


Choose one course from the following three*: 


HUIIOA/B 


3 cr 3 cr 




PR 201 


Relief/Monotype 


3.0 


HU103A/B 
HU I40A/B 


3 cr 3 cr 
3 cr 3 cr. 




PR 204 


Screenprinting/Etching 


3.0 


Literature 


3 cr 




SC202 


Sculpture 1 


3.0 


Humanities 


3cr 










Social Science 3 cr. 3 cr. 




HU140B 


Art History Survey II 


3.0 


Science/Math 3 cr. 




HUXXX 


Liberal Arts 


3.0 


Lib. Arts Electives 3 cr. 3 cr 




Spring Tota 




15.0 


Art History Elective 3 cr. 




Sophomore 


Year Total 


30.0 









The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



41 



Printmaking/Book Arts 

Lois M.Johnson 

ljohnson@uarts.edu 

Coordinator 

215-717-6491 

The Printmaking major bases its instruc- 
tional program on the development and 
realization of visual ideas through multiple 
image-making processes. The primary 
objectives are to develop conceptual 
abilities and technical proficiencies, 
leading the student to acquire personal 
imagery and professional competence in 
printmaking media. 

The department provides the expertise of 
a faculty of professional artists to study tra- 
ditional and contemporary methods. The 
major graphic media explored include relief 
processes, etching (intaglio), lithography 
stone, metal plate, and offset and water- 
based screenpiinting, and non-silver 
photographic printmaking. Courses in book 
and typographic design stimulate experi- 
mentation in unifying the elements of paper, 
prints, typography, and bookbinding. 

Visiting artists, field trips, and guest lec- 
turers supplement the studio experience. 
Using the city as an extended workshop. 
Print students attend seminars and museum 
collections. The Print Study Seminar is held 
in the Print Room at the Philadelphia 
Museum of Art and furnishes a unique 
opportunity to study original prints from the 
15th through the 20th centuries. 

The main emphasis over the three-year 
undergraduate period of study is on the evo- 
lution of students as artists who make 
individualized demands upon the media. As 
with any study in the fine arts, the experi- 
ence should be multidimensional, reflective 
of a broad range of personal and profes- 
sional involvement, and reinforced with 
stimulation from related areas of interest, 
including drawing, painting, digital arts, 
photography, graphic design, illustration, 
sculpture, and crafts. 

The undergraduate curriculum is enhanced 
by the graduate program in Book Arts/ 
Printmaking. This two-year course of study of 
60 credits culminates in a Master of Fine Arts 
Degree. The program provides the opportu- 
nity for the individual artist's expression in 
limited edition bookworks. Undergraduate 
students work alongside MFA candidates in 
studios, workshops, and some major and elec- 
tive classes. (Students interested in the MFA 
degree in Book Arts/Printmaking should con- 
tact the Department of Printmaking or the 
Office of Admission.) 



Facilities 

The Printmaking Department provides 
extensive facilides for water-based screen- 
printing, stone and plate lithography, relief, 
etching and non-silver photographic 
processes. The bookbinding room houses 
book presses, board shear, and a guillotine 
paper cutter. The letterpress studio contains 
three Vandercook presses for printing 
handset type and polymer plates with over 
100 fonts of varied type. The offset lithog- 
raphy press room features a Davidson 901 
offset press used by the students for hands- 
on experience. 

Another important resource is the 
Borowsky Center for Publication Arts, 
which is equipped with a Heidelberg KORS 
offset press and a full darkroom for experi- 
mental and production printing of student, 
faculty, and visiting artist works. 

Printmaking/Book Arts faculty and stu- 
dents have been committed to the testing 
and integration of non-toxic printmaking 
processes and inks in the studios since the 
late 1970s. 

Printmaking/ Boole Arts Faculty 

Carol Barton 

Senior Lecturer 

BFA, Washington University 

Denise Carbone 

Senior Lecturer 

BFA, Glassboro State College 

MFA, The University of the Arts 

Sandra Davis 

Lecturer 

BFA, The University of the Arts ■ 

James Dupree 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 

BFA, Columbus College of Art • ' 

and Design 
MFA, University of Pennsylvania 

James Green 

Master Lecturer 
BFA, Oberlin College 
MPh. Yale University 
MLA, Columbia University 

Lois M. Johnson 

Professor 

BS, University of North Dakota 

MFA, University of Wisconsin-Madison 



Nathan Knobler 

Professor 

BFA, Syracuse University 

MA, Florida State University 

Hedi Kyle 

Adjunct Associate Professor 
Diploma, Werk-Kunstschule, Wiesbaden, 
Germany 

Peter Lister 

Senior Lecturer 

Certificate, Pennsylvania Academy of 

the Fine Arts 
The Barnes Foundation, Philadelphia 

MaryPhelan 

Associate Professor 

BS, The College of Saint Rose 

MA. University of Wisconsin-Madison 

Rosae Reeder 

Lecturer 

BFA, The University at Buffalo, 

New York 
MFA, The University of the Arts 

Anthony Rosati . . 

Adjunct Associate Professor 
BA, Rider College 
MFA, Tyler School of Art, 
Temple University 

Laurel Schwass-Drew 

Lecturer 

BFA, The University of the Arts 

Patricia M. Smith 

Assistant Professor 

BA. Immaculata College 

MAEd, Philadelphia College of Art 

Lorl Spencer 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 

BFA, State University of New York, 

Purchase 
MFA, The University of the Arts 

Sarah Van Keuren 

Adjunct Professor 

BA, Swarthmore College 

MFA, University of Delaware 



42 



sity of the Art.s Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



Printmaking/Book Arts 

Bachelor of Fine Arts 123 credits 



Foundatic 


n Credits 


Junior 


Credits 


Fall 


Fall 






FPIIO 


Drawing 


3.0 


FA 333 A 


Attitudes and Strategies 


3.0 


FPI20 


2-D Design 


3.0 


PR 300 


Lithography 


3.0 


FP130 


3-D Design 


3.0 


PR 306 


Print Study Seminar I 
Electives 


1.5 
3.0 




Electives 


1.5 


HUXXX 


Liberal Arts 


6.0 


HUllOA 


First Year Writing I 


3.0 














Fall Total 




16.5 


HU103A 


Intro, to Modernism I 


3.0 








Fall Total 




16.5 


Spring 












PR 333 


Attitudes and Strategies 


3.0 


Spring 






PR 301 


Printmaking Workshop 


1.5 


Choose any 


three courses: 




PR 307 


Book Arts: 




FPlll 


Drawing 


3.0 




Concepts and Structure 


3.0 


FP121 


2-D Design 


3.0 




Electives 


3.0 


FP131 


3-D Design 


3.0 


HUXXX 


Liberal Arts 


6.0 


FP140 


Time and Motion 
Electives 


3.0 
1.5 


Spring Total 




16.5 








Junior Year Total 


33,0 


HUIIOB 


First Year Writing n 
Intro, to Modernism II 


3.0 
3.0 
16.5 








HL:|03B 


Senior 






Spring Tota 


Fall 






Freshman Year Total 


33.0 


PR 400 


Ad\anced Workshop 


3.0 








PR 406 


Print Studv Seminar II 


1.5 


Sophomore 






Electives 


6.0 


Fall 






HUXXX 


Liberal Arts 


3.0 


FA 222 A 


Drawing: Form and Space 


3.0 


Fall Total 




13.5 


PR 201 


Relief/Monotype 


3.0 


Spring 






PT202 


Sophomore Painting 


3.0 


PR 420 


Thesis Workshop 


3,0 


HUI40A 


Art History Sur\'ey I 


3.0 


FA 460 


Senior Fine Arts Seminar 


1.5 


HU XXX 


Liberal Arts 


3.0 




Electives 


6.0 


Fall Total 




15.0 


HUXXX 


Liberal Arts 


3.0 


Spring 






Spring Total 




13.5 


PR 204 


Screen Printing/Etching 


3.0 














Senior Year 'total: 


27.0 


SC201 


Sculpture I 
course from the following thr 


3.0 








Choose one 


ee: 








FA 222 B 


Drawing: Form and Space 


3.0 


Electives must include at least nine studio credits 


FA 223 


Intro, to Figure Modeling 


3.0 


outside the Printmaking/Book Arts offerings. 


FA 205 


ConceptsAVorks on Paper 


3.0 


Liberal Arts Distribution 




HUI40B 


Art History Survey II 


3.0 


Note all Liberal Arts courses are 3.0 credits. 


HUXXX 


Liberal Arts 


3.0 


HUllOAm 


3 en 3 en 










HUI03A/B 


3 en 3 en 




Spring Tota 




15.0 


HU140A/B 


3 en 3 en 




Sophomore 


Year Total 


30.0 


Literature 3 cr 
Humanities 3 cr 
Social Science 3 en 3 en 


















Science/Math 3 en 










Lib. Arts Electives 3 en 3 en 










Art Histor\ Elective 3 en 





The University of ttie Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



« 



Sculpture 

Jeanne Jaffe 

jjatfe@uarts.edu 

Coordinator 

215-717-6102 

The field of sculpture today is open and 
wide-ranging. Sculptors now create works 
that range from coin-sized medallic art to 
pieces that incorporate actual craters and 
other natural landforms. While some sculp- 
tors work with traditional materials such as 
clay and stone, others incorporate light and 
sound and video into their work. Figurative 
sculpture today can be either traditional 
modeled forms, or robotic forms that actu- 
ally move. The expansive nature of 
sculpture provides a challenge to institu- 
tions that educate artists, and we take that 
challenge seriously. 

The Sculpture Department's aim is to 
provide a sound, balanced exposure to all 
the formal, technical, and intellectual 
aspects of art, in preparation for the stu- 
dent's continued professional growth 
beyond the undergraduate years. To this 
end, our curriculum is structured to provide 
formal and technical instruction, while at 
the same time allowing for individual cre- 
ative development. Seminar classes in the 
junior and senior years engage the student 
in discussions on sculpture theory, philos- 
ophy, and critical thought. 

Comprehensive facilities include fully 
equipped wood and metal shops, a foundry, 
a plaster shop and figure modeling studio, 
as well as an open studio for general use. 
Juniors and seniors have individual studios. 
A full-time shop supervisor provides tech- 
nical assistance and supervision. Faculty 
members are all practicing professional 
sculptors, representing a wide variety of 
styles and interests. Classroom instruction is 
supplemented by visiting artists, gallery and 
museum visits in Philadelphia, and field 
trips to New York and Washington D.C. 

Our graduating students are recognized 
nationally for their creativity and diversity, 
and for their preparation for the next steps 
in their professional careers. 



Sculpture Faculty 

Harvey Citron 

Adjunct Professor ' 

BFAEd, Pratt Institute 

Diploma, Academy of Fine Arts, Rome 

Laura Frazure 

Senior Lecturer 

BFA, The University of the Arts 

Jeanne Jaffa 

Professor 

BFA, Tyler School of Art, 

Temple University 
MFA, New York State College 

of Ceramics at Alfred University 

Elsa Johnson 

Professor 

BFA, Cooper Union 

MFA, University of Pennsylvania 

Mashiko Nakashima 

Master Lecturer 

Brooklyn Museum School of Art 

Steve Nocella 

Senior Lecturer 

BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 

MFA, University of Pennsylvania 

Barry Parker 

Professor 

BFA, Eastern Michigan University 

MFA, University of Massachusetts 

John Phillips 

Master Lecturer 

BA, Temple University 

Jennie Shanker i 

Senior Lecturer 

BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 

MFA, Yale University 



44 



The University of the Ans Undergraduate and Gr.iduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



Sculpture 

Bachelor of Fine Arts 123 credits 



Foundation 



Credits 



Junior 



Credits 



Liberal Arts Distribution 

Note all Liberal Arts courses are 3.0 credits. 



Fall 






Fall 






HUllOA/B 


3 CK 3 cr. 


FPllO 


Drawing 


3.0 


FA 333 A 


Attitudes and Strategies 


3.0 


HUI03A/B 


3 CK 3 cr 


FP120 


2-D Design 


3.0 


SC251 


Theories of Structure 


1.5 


HU140A/B 
Literature 


3 CK 3 CK 
3CK 


FP 130 


3-D Design 


3.0 




Sculpture Elective* 


1.5 


Humanities 


3CK 










Electives 


3.0 


Social Science 


3 CK 3 cr 




Electives 


1.5 


HUXXX 


Liberal Arts 


6.0 


Science/Math 


3CK 


HUllOA 


First Year Writing I 


3.0 


Fall Total 




15.0 


Lib. Arts Electives 


3 CK 3 CK 


HU103A 


Intro, to Modernism 1 


3.0 




Art History Elective 


3CK 


Fall Total 




16.5 


Spring 

SC 333 


Attitudes and Strategies 


3.0 






Spring 








Sculpture Elective* 


3.0 






Clioose am 


three courses: 






Electives 


3.0 






FPlll 


Drawing 


3.0 


HUXXX 


Liberal Arts 


6.0 






FP121 


2-D Design 


3.0 


















Spring Total 


15.0 






FP131 


3-D Design 


3.0 












FP140 


Time and Motion 
Electives 


3.0 
1.5 


lunior Year Total 


30.0 








Senior 








HUllOB 


First Year Writing n 


3.0 


Fall 










HU 103 B 


Intro, to Modernism H 


3.0 
















SC401 


Sculpture III 


3.0 






Spring Tota 




16.5 




Sculpture Elective* 


3.0 






Freshman Year Total 


33.0 




Electives 


6.0 












HU XXX 


Liberal Arts 


3.0 






Sophomore 




Fall Total 




15.0 




\ 


Fall 






Spring 










SC201 


Sculpture I 


3.0 


SC402 


Sculpture Ul 


3.0 






FA 223 


Intro, to Figure Modeling 


3.0 


FA 460 


Senior Fine Arts Seminar 


1.5 






Choose one course from the following thi 


ee: 




Sculpture Elective* 


1.5 






PT202A 


Sophomore Painting 


3.0 




Electives 


6.0 






PR 201 


Relief/Monotype 


3.0 


HUXXX 


Liberal Arts 


3.0 






PR 204 


Screen Printing/Etching 


3.0 


Spring Total 


15.0 






HU140A 


Art History Survey I 


3.0 












HUXXX 


Liberal Arts 


3.0 
15.0 


Senior Year Total 


30.0 






Fall Total 










Spring 






* Sculpture 


Electives 








SC202 


Sculpture 1 


3.0 


Choose from: 








Choose one course from the following three: 


SC220A 


Molding and Casting 








PT202B 


Sophomore Painting 


3.0 


SC241 


Intro, to Sculpture Projects 








PR 201 


Relief/Monotype 


3.0 


SC242 


Intro, to Sculpture Projects 








PR 204 


Screen Printing/Etching 


3.0 


SC260A 


Structure of the Figure 








HU140B 


Art History Survey II 


3.0 


SC 260 B 


Structure of the Figure 








HUXXX 


Liberal Arts 


3.0 













Choose one course from the following three: 
FA 222 B Drawing: Form and Space 3.0 
FA 223 Intro, to Figure Modeling 3.0 

FA 205 ConceptsAVorks on Paper 3.0 

Spring Total 15.0 



Sophomore Year Total 



30.0 



SC321 Carving 

SC421 Metals 

SC 43 1 A Advanced Figure Modeling 

SC 43 1 B Advanced Figure Modeling 

SC441 Advanced Projects 

SC 442 Advanced Projects . ' - ' ■ 

SC 443 Projects in Figure Modeling 

Electives must include at least nine studio credits 

outside the Sculpture offerings. 



Tlie University of tiie Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



45 



Graphic Design 



Debra Drodvillo 

ddrodvillo@uarts.edu 
Chairperson ' . 

215-717-6225 

Graphic designers play a key role in our 
information-based society. They give form 
to the interface between users and our cul- 
ture of rapidly proliferating products, 
places, processes, information, and services. 

The Graphic Design Department, since its 
beginning, has sought to give students the 
basis to solve problems in communication in 
a way that merges concerns for fidelity to 
content, for the visual aesthetic, and for 
engaging the reader-viewer's rapport. 

The faculty and students are engaged in a 
collaborative process of exploring the 
"New" as it emerges. For graphic design, 
the New has meant specifically the transfor- 
mation of media, which affects how 
messages are created and transmitted, and 
how the intersection of design, media, and 
culture understood. 

Throughout the three years of major 
concentration, problems in graphic commu- 
nication are combined with exploratory and 
experimental studies in drawing, color, pho- 
tography, typography, and emerging 
technologies. The curriculum is supple- 
mented by special lecture programs; 
workshops with invited design firms; and 
on-site studio seminars in selected design 
offices and studios, paper and printing 
plants, museums and libraries, and with film 
and computer graphic producers. 

Opportunities for additional study in fine 
arts, illustration, photography, animation, 
filmmaking, and emerging technologies are 
available. 

Designers work across several media and 
venues-from handmade images to digital 
images, still images to time-based commu- 
nications, and print-oriented problems to 
communications in cyberspace. 

With successful completion of the pro- 
gram, students are prepared for entry-level 
positions as graphic designers with design 
studios, publishers, corporations, nonprofit 
institutions, governmental agencies, archi- 
tects and planners, network or cable 
broadcasters, film and video producers, or 
advertising agencies. 

The faculty are practicing professionals 
with distinguished records of accomplish- 
ment, sensitive and responsive to the 
changes in the field of design, yet not lim- 
ited by its current practices. 



Graphic Design Faculty 

HansAllemann 

Adjunct Professor 

Swiss National Diploma, School of 
Design, Basel, Switzerland 

Jan Almquist 

Adjunct Professor 

BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 

Laurence Bach 

Professor 

BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 
Certificate, Graduate Study, School of 
Design, Basel, Switzerland 

Jennifer Bernstein 

Senior Lecturer 

BA, Brown University 

MFA, Yale University 

Jolin Connolly 

Senior Lecturer 

BFA, The University of the Arts 

MFA, Yale University 

Debra Drodvillo 

Assistant Professor 
BFA, Cooper Union 
MFA, Yale University 

Inge Druckrey 

Professor 

AB, University of Basel, Basel, 
Switzerland 

Swiss National Diploma, School of 
Design, Basel, Switzerland 

Richard Felton 

Professor 

BS in Design, University of Cincinnati 

MFA, Yale University 

Dorothy Funderwhite 

Senior Lecturer 

BFA, The University of the Arts 
Certificate, Graduate Study, School of 
Design, Basel, Switzerland 

Marie Greco 

Senior Lecturer 

BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 

Kenneth Hiebert 

Professor Emeritus 
BA, Bethel College 
Swiss National Diploma, School of 
Design, Basel, Switzerland 



Peter Kery 

Master Lecturer 

BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 

Deborah McSorley-Kery 

Senior Lecturer 

BFA, The University of the Arts 

Chris Myers 

Associate Professor 

BA, University of Toledo 

MFA, Yale University 

Kristie Williams 

Associate Professor 
BS, University of Cincinnati 
MFA, Yale University 
Certificate, Graduate Study, School of 
Design, Basel, Switzerland 

Chris Zelinsky 

Associate Professor 
Swiss National Diploma, School of 
Design, Basel, Switzerland 



46 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



Graphic Design 

Bachelor of Fine Arts 123 credits 



Foundatio 


n 


Credits 


Junior 




Credits 


Fall 


Fall 








FPllO 


Drawing 


3.0 


GD306A 


Typography Emph 


asis 


3.0 


FP120 


2-D Design 


3.0 


EM 202 


Electronic Media/ 






FPI30 


3-D Design 


3.0 




Production U 




1.5 


HUllOA 
HU103A 


Electives 

First Year Writing I 

Intro, to Modernism 1 


1.5 
3.0 
3.0 


GD311A 

HU254 
HUXXX 


Communications Studio 

Electives 

History of Comm. Design 

Liberal Arts 


3.0 
1.5 
3.0 
3.0 


Fall Total 




16.5 


Fall Total 






15.0 


Spring 

Choose any 
FPlll 
FP121 
FP 131 
FP140 


three courses: 
Drawing 
2-D Design 
3-D Design 
Time and Motion 


3.0 
3.0 
3.0 
3.0 


Spring 

GD 306 B 
EM 203 
GD311B 

HUXXX 


Typography Emphasis 3.0 
Digital Interactive Techniques 1 .5 
Communications Studio 3.0 
Electives 1 .5 
Liberal Arts 6.0 




Electives 


1.5 


Spring Total 






15.0 


HUllOB 
HU 103 B 


First Year Writing II 
Intro, to Modernism II 


3.0 
3.0 
16.5 


Junior Year Total 




30.0 


Spring Tota 


Senior 








Freshman Year Total 


33.0 


Fall 














GD4I 1 A 


Design Studio 




3.0 


Sophomore 




GD4I2A 


Problem-Solving 




3.0 


Fall 








Electives 




3.0 


GD210 


Letterform Design 


3.0 


HUXXX 


Liberal Arts 




6.0 


GD211A 


Descriptive Drawing 


3.0 


Fall Total 






15.0 


GD213A 


Design Systems 


3.0 


Spring 










Electives 


3.0 


GD4IIB 


Design Studio 




3.0 


HU140A 


Art History Survey I 


3.0 


GD412B 


Problem-Solving 




3.0 


Fall Total 




15.0 




Electives 




3.0 


Spring 






HUXXX 


Liberal Arts 




6.0 


GD2I2 


Typography Fundamentals 3.0 


Spring Total 






15.0 


EM 201 


Electronic Media/ 
Production I 
Descriptive Drawing 


1.5 
3.0 


Senior Year Total: 




30,0 


GD2IIB 










GD2I3B 


Design Systems 


3.0 


Electives must include nine studio credit. 


taken 


HU 140 B 


Electives 

Art History Survey II 


1.5 
3.0 


outside the Graphic Design offerings. 




Spring Tota 




15.0 


Liberal Arts Distribution 

Note all Liberal Arts courses art 


3.0 credits. 


Sophomore 


Year Total 


30.0 


HUllOA/B 
HU 103 A/B 


3cr 
3 cr 


3cr 
3cr 










HU140A/B 


3cr 


3cr 










Literature 


3cr 












Humanities 


3cr 












Social Science 3 cr 


3cr 










Science/Math 3 cr 












Lib. Arts Electives 3 cr 


3cr 










HU 254 His 


oiy of Comm. 


3cr 





The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



lil 



Illustration 



MarkTocchet 

mtocchet@uarts.edu 

Chairperson 

215-717-6240 

Illustrators give visual substance to 
thoughts, stories, and ideas. The Illustration 
Department prepares its students for entry 
into the fields of book and periodical pub- 
lishing, promotion, advertising, design, and 
specialty fields. 

Illustrators must call upon a broad range 
of traditional and up-to-date competencies 
to respond to today's visual problems. As 
visual communicators, illustrators need to 
be open-minded, eclectic, flexible, and 
imaginative. The illustrator's solution 
should be appropriate, intelligent, expres- 
sive, and visually engaging. 

In order to prepare for a career in this 
competitive field. The University of the Arts 
Illustration student develops skills that 
encompass two-dimensional media: from 
painting and drawing to photography, 
design, production processes, and emerging 
opportunities in digital image-making. 
Students may concentrate on a studio, a dig- 
ital, or a pictorially-oriented illustration 
curriculum. These skills are nurtured within 
a stimulating cultural climate provided by 
the resources of the faculty, visiting profes- 
sionals, a gallery exhibition program, the 
University, and the city at large. Each stu- 
dent progresses from general competencies 
to a personal viewpoint, clarified career 
goals, a professional attitude, and a finished 
portfolio. 



Illustration Faculty 

Jonathan Barkat 

Senior Lecturer 

BFA, The University of the Arts 

Megan Berkheiser 

Senior Lecturer 

BFA, The University of the Arts 

MFA, School of Visual Arts 

Jay Bevenour 

Lecturer 

BA, Tyler School of Art, 
Temple University 

Brian Biggs 

Assistant Professor 

BFA. Parsons School of Design 

Robert Byrd 

Senior Lecturer 

BFA, The University of the Arts 

Russell Farrell 

Senior Lecturer 

BFA, The University of the Arts 

Renee Foulks 

Master Lecturer 
BFA, Moore College of Art 
MFA, Tyler Schoofof Art, 
Temple University 

Ralph Giguere 

Adjunct Associate Professor 
BFA, The University of the Arts 

Linda Gist 

Senior Lecturer 

BFA, The University of the Arts 

AlGury 

Master Lecturer 

BA, St. Louis University 

Sabln Howard 

Master Lecturer 

BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 

MFA. New York Academy of Art 

Paul King 

Adjunct Associate Professor 
Certificate, Pennsylvania Academy 

of Fine Art 
BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 
MFA, Boston University 



Earl Lewis 

Adjunct Associate Professor 
BFA, MFA, Tyler School of Art, 
Temple University 

William Masi 

Senior Lecturer 

BFA, The University of the Arts 

Tim O'Brien 

Senior Lecturer 

BFA, Paier College of Art 

Phyllis Purves-Smith 

Associate Professor 
BFA, Cooper Union 
MFA, Tyler School of Art, 
Temple University 

David Rankin, III 

Senior Lecturer 

BFA, The University of the Arts 

Roger Roth 

Senior Lecturer 
BFA, Pratt Institute 

Robert Stein 

Professor 

BFA, Massachusetts College of Art 
MFA, Tyler School of Art,"" 
Temple University 

Stephen Tarantal 

Professor 

BFA, Cooper Union 
MFA. Tyler School of Art, 
Temple University 

Mark Tocchet 

Associate Professor 

BFA, School of Visual Arts 



48 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



Illustration 

Bachelor of Fine Arts 123 credits 



Foundation 



Credits 



Fall 

FPllO 
FP120 
FP130 



Drawing 
2-D Design 
3-D Design 



Electives 
HUllOA First Year Writing I 
HU 1 03 A Intro, to Modernism I 
Fall Total 

Spring 

Choose any three courses: 
FP 1 1 1 Drawing 

FP121 2-D Design 

FP131 3-D Design 

FP 140 Time and Motion 

Electives 
HUllOB First Year Writing II 
HU 103 B Intro, to Modernism II 
Spring Total 



Fresliman Year Total 



Sophomore 



Fall 

IL200A 
IL202A 
IL204 
HU140A 
HUXXX 
Fall Total 
Spring 
IL 200 B 
IL 202 B 
PF209 
HU 140 B 
HUXXX 
Spring Total 



Pictorial Foundation 
Figure Anatomy 
Typography 
Art History Survey I 
Liberal Arts 



Pictorial Foundation 
Figure Anatomy 
Photo, for Illustrators 
Art History Survey II 
Liberal Arts 



Sophomore Year Total 



3.0 
3.0 
3.0 

1.5 
3.0 
3.0 
16.5 



3.0 
3.0 
3.0 
3.0 

1.5 
3.0 
3.0 
16.5 



3.0 
3.0 
3.0 
3.0 
3.0 
15.0 

3.0 
3.0 
3.0 
3.0 
3.0 
15.0 



30.0 



Junior 



Credits 



Fall 

IL300A 
IL30I 
IL 302 

HUXXX 
Fall Total 
Spring 

IL 300 B 
IL 303 
IL304 

HUXXX 

Spring Total 



Figure, Digital or Studio Track 

Illustration Methods 
Design Methods 
Figurative Communication 
Electives 
Liberal Arts 



Illustration Methods 
Figure Utilization 
Sequential Format* or 
Electives 
Liberal Arts 



3.0 
3.0 
3.0 
3.0 
3.0 
15.0 

3.0 
3.0 
3.0 

6.0 
15.0 



Junior Year Total: 



30.0 



Senior 



Fall 

IL 400 A 
IL 403 A 

HUXXX 
Fall Total 
Spring 

IL 400 B 
IL403B 

HUXXX 

Spring Total 



Figure, Digital or Studio Tracl< 



Illustration 
Senior Portfolio 
Electives 
Liberal Arts 



Illustration 
Senior Portfolio 
Electives 
Liberal Arts 



3.0 
3.0 
3.0 
6.0 
15.0 

3.0 
3.0 
6.0 
3.0 
15.0 



Senior Year Total 



30.0 



Electives must include at least nine studio credits 
outside the Illustration offerings. 
* Sequential Format is only required of 
Design/Studio Track Students 

Liberal Arts Distribution 

Note all Liberal Arts courses are 3.0 credits. 



HUllOA/B 


3cr 


3CK 


HU103A/B 


3cr 


3CK 


HU 140A/B 


3cr 


3cr. 


Literature 


3cr 




Humanities 


3cr 




Social Science 


3CK 


3CK 


Science/Math 


3cr 




Lib. Arts Electives 


3 en 


3cr 


Art History Elective 


3CK 





The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



49 



Industrial Design 



Jonas Milder 

jmilder@uarts.edu 

Chairperson 

215-717-6250 

The Industrial Design Department pro- 
vides a professional education for those 
wishing to bring order, utility, aesthetics, 
and appropriateness to the products, con- 
tents, and processes of our modem global 
society. The program prepares students for 
careers in the design of products, environ- 
ments, and design systems/strategies, 
integrating the design of communications, 
furniture, equipment, interfaces, and inte- 
riors/exhibits. Also addressed are issues of 
human factors research, computer-aided 
design, product development, manufac- 
turing, business, and a host of other 
considerations related to the humanistic 
uses of technology. 

Industrial Design involves considerable 
conceptual experimentation. An encom- 
passing investigation into our evolving 
material-product culture and contemporary 
social issues provides a forum in which stu- 
dents may draw from diverse sources: high 
technology, fine arts, industrial production, 
architectural constructions, invention, social 
behavior, craft techniques, and contempo- 
rary design culture. 

The department emphasizes the develop- 
ment of graphic, sculptural, and spatial 
design skills as a complement to creative 
problem-solving, technical innovafion, and 
effective communications during the solu- 
tion of actual problems of design. 

After initial coursework to introduce 
basic design, communication, and collabo- 
ration processes, including computer-aided 
design and model-making, students develop 
and apply theory, skill, and knowledge to 
functional design problems, many brought 
into the studio by industry. Visiting 
designers also bring knowledge of current 
design, manufacturing, and professional 
practices into studio and lecture courses, 
while visits to industry provide opportuni- 
ties for direct observation and firsthand 
knowledge of design and manufacturing 
processes. Based on this foundation of skill, 
experience, and information, emphasis in 
the final semesters shifts to the responsi- 
bility for integration of the total design 
process by the individual student, who 
works directly with a client/sponsor on a 
thesis project prior to graduation. During 



the final semester, the instructional focus 
shifts to career planning, portfolio prepara- 
tion, and the development of information- 
gathering and business communication 
skills to better prepare the student to enter 
the profession. 

Due to the wide scope and creative, yet 
practical character of an Industrial Design 
education, many career opportunities await 
the graduate with consulting design firms, 
corporate design staffs, manufacturing facil- 
ities, exhibit houses, retailers, advertising/ 
marketing agencies, research organizations, 
museums, educational institutions, and gov- 
ernment agencies, all of whom recognize 
the need to constantly improve the appear- 
ance, manufacture, performance, and social 
value of their products. 



Industrial Design Faculty 

Michelle Barfoot 

Senior Lecturer 

BA, The University of Rhode Island 

MID, The University of the Arts 

Rama Chorpash 

Assistant Professor 
BSID, California College of 
Arts and Crafts 

David Comberg 

Adjunct Associate Professor 

BFA, Massachusetts College of Art 

MFA, Yale School of Art 

Antliony Guido 

Associate Professor 

BSID, The Ohio State University 

Jamer Hunt 

Associate Professor 
BA, Brown University 
PhD, Rice University 

James Janish 

Senior Lecturer 

BS, State University of New York, Buffalo 

MID, Prati Institute 

Miciiael McAllister 

Senior Lecturer . ' • 

BS, Drexel University 

MID, The University of the Arts 

Jonas Milder 

Assistant Professor 

BID, Fachhochschule fuer Gestaltung, 

Germany 
Design Diploma (MID), 

Hochschule der Kuenste, 

Berlin, Germany 

Larry Mitnick 

Associate Professor 
BArch, Cooper Union 
MArch, Harvard University 

Barent Roth 

Senior Lecturer 

BSID, University of Illinois 

MID, The University of the Arts 

Jane Swanson 

Senior Lecturer 

BS, Iowa State University 



50 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



Industrial Design 

Bachelor of Science 126 credits 



Foundation 



Credits 



Fall 






FPllO 


Drawing 


3.0 


FP120 


2-D Design 


3.0 


FP130 


3-D Design 


3.0 




Electives 


1.5 


HUllOA 


First Year Writing 1 


3.0 


HU103A 


Intro, to Modernism 1 


3.0 


Fall Total 




16.5 


Spring 






Choose am 


three courses: 




FPlll 


Drawing 


3.0 


FP121 


2-D Design 


3.0 


FP131 


3-D Design 


3.0 


FP140 


Time and Motion 


3.0 



Electives 1.5 

HUllOB First Year Writing!! 3.0 

HU103B Intro, to Modernism 11 3.0 

Spring Total 16.5 



Freshman Year Total 



33.0 



Sophomore 



ID 200 A 


Studio 1: Projects 


3.0 


ID 220 A 


Studio 2: Techniques 


3.0 


ID 214 


Materials and Processes Sem. 3.0 


HU140A 


Art History Sur\'ey I 


3.0 


HU251 


History of Industrial Design 


3.0 


Fall Total 




15.0 


Spring 






ID 200 B 


Studio 1 ; Projects 


3.0 


ID 220 B 


Studio 2: Techniques 


3.0 


ID 290 


Design Issues Seminar 


3.0 




Electives 


3.0 


HU 140 B 


Art History Sun'ey 11 


3.0 


Spring Tota 




15.0 



Sophomore Year Total 



30.0 



Junior 



Credits 



Fall 

ID 300 A Studio 3: Projects Studio 3.0 

ID 320 A Studio 4: Techniques 3.0 

ID 327 Design Semantics Seminar 3.0 

Electives 3.0 

HU XXX Liberal Arts 6.0 

Fall Total 18.0 

Spring 

ID 300 B Smdio 3: Projects Studio 3.0 

ID 320 B Studio 4: Techniques 3.0 

ID 326 Human Factors Seminar 3.0 

HU XXX Liberal Arts 6.0 

Spring Total 15.0 



Junior Year Total 



33.0 



Senior 



Fall 

ID 400 A Studio 5: Projects Studio 3.0 
ID 420 A Studio 6: 

Professional Comm. 3.0 

ID 490 A Design Theory Seminar 3.0 

HU XXX Liberal Arts 6.0 

Fall Total 15.0 
Spring 

ID 400 B Studio 5: Projects Studio 3.0 
ID 420 B Studio 6: 

Professional Comm. 3.0 

ID 490 B Design Practice Seminar 3.0 

Electives 3.0 

HU XXX Liberal Arts 3.0 

Spnng Total 15.0 



Senior Year Total 



30.0 



Electives must include nine studio credits taken 
outside the Industrial Design offerings. 

Recommended Electives: 

While none of the following is required for 

graduation, they are recommended by the 

department. 

ID 113 Freshman ID 

ID 312 Architectonics 

PF 203 Portfolio Documentation 

CR 25 1 Intro, to Molding and Casting 

CR252 Plaster Workshop 

EM 1 10 Computer Concepts 

EM 210 Digital Multimedia 

HU 452 Topics in Design 



Liberal Arts Distribution 

Note all Liberal Arts courses are 3.0 credits. 

HUllOA/B 5cr. 3 cr. 

HU103A/B 3cr. 3 cr 

HU140A/B 3cr 3 cr 

Literature 3 cr 

Humanities 3 cr 

Social Science 3 cr 3 cr 

Science/Math 3 cr 

Lib. Arts Electives 3 cr 3 cr 

An Histor\' Elective 3 cr 



Tlie University of ttie Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/7004 



51 



Media Arts 



Harris Fogel 

hfogel@uart.s.edu 

Chaiiperson 

215-717-6300 

The Media Arts Department offers majors 
in photograpliy, film/digital video, and ani- 
mation, wiiile providing elective classes to 
the University at large. The three-year cur- 
riculum of each major is built around a 
sequence of courses designed to move the 
student to a position of independence within 
the discipline. Many of our studio courses 
feature a written component to provide a 
balance between technical skills and the 
critical thinking and historical context nec- 
essary for a complete exploration of one's 
medium. An introduction to the funda- 
mental ideas and techniques of the medium 
fills much of the sophomore year. During 
the two remaining years, the student is 
expected to refine techniques, develop a 
sense of personal vision, identify goals, and 
pursue activities directly related to profes- 
sional practice. 

The Media Arts Department provides 
extensive studio facilities and equipment for 
students enrolled in its courses. A nominal 
fee is required for access. 

Philadelphia's professional resources 
have allowed the department to develop an 
extensive internship program for advanced 
Media Arts majors. This program allows 
students to gain professional experience 
while earning academic credit. Internship 
sponsors have included commercial photog- 
raphy studios; galleries; independent artists; 
animation, film, video, and multimedia pro- 
duction houses: television stations; medical 
facilities; magazine and book publishers; 
and digital imaging studios. 

The Media Arts Department also offers 
minor concentrations in all three of its pro- 
grams-film/digital video, animation, and 
photography-which are available to stu- 
dents outside of their major studio program. 
Those interested in this option should con- 
sult with both their major advisor and the 
Media Arts Department. 



Media Arts Faculty 

George Akerley 

Adjunct Associate Professor 
BM, Composition, Philadelphia 

Musical Academy 
MM, Composition, Philadelphia College 

of Performing Arts 

Susan Arthur 

Senior Lecturer 

BA, Wellesley College 

MA. The University of Texas, Austin 

Laurence Bach 

Professor 

BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 
Certificate, Graduate Study, School of 
Design, Basel, Switzerland 

Rick Barrick 

Senior Lecturer 

BA, University of Georgia 

MFA, School of Visual Arts 

Lowed Boston 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 
BFA, The University of the Arts 
MFA, California Institute of the Arts 

Gerard Brown 

Lecturer . . 

BFA, Boston University School of 

Fine Arts 
MFA, School of the Art Institute of 
Chicago 

John J. Carlano 

Adjunct Associate Professor 
BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 

Connie Coleman 

Adjunct Professor 
BFA, MFA, Rhode Island School 
of Design 

John Columbus 

Adjunct Associate Professor 
BFA, Hartford Art School 
MFA, Columbia University School 
of the Arts 

Colette Copeland 

Lecturer 

BFA, Pratt Institute 

MFA, Syracuse University 



David Deneen 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 
BFA, The University of the Arts 

Dominic Episcopo 

Lecturer 

BFA, The University of the Arts 

Alida Fish 

Professor , ] 

BA. Smith College I 

MFA, Rochester Institute of Technology 

Harris Fogel 

Associate Professor 

BA, Humboldt State University 

MA, New York University 

JudyGelles - 

Senior Lecturer 

BS, Boston University J 

MEd, University of Miami ] 

MFA, Rhode Island School of Design ' 

David Graham 

Associate Professor ■ '•] 

BFA, Philadelphia College of Art J 

MFA, Tyler School of Art, '' 

Temple University . \ 

Matthew Hollerbush ' 

Lecturer ^ ••] 

BFA, The University of the Arts 

Jenny Lynn 

Senior Lecturer 
BFA. Tyler School of Art, 
Temple University 

Robert Lyons 

Senior Lecturer ^ 

BS, State University of New York, : 

New Paltz '. 

Chris Magee 

Assistant Professor i 

BA, Reed College ! 

BFA, University of Oregon j 

MFA, California Institute of the Arts j 

i 
Michael O'Reilly \ 

Lecturer J 

BS, Indiana University of Pennsylvania , 

Jeannie Pearce i 

Adjunct Professor ' 

BFA, Rochester Institute of Technology ' 
MFA, University of Delaware 



52 



The University of the Aits Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



John Phillips 

Senior Lecturer 

Barbara Proud 

Senior Lecturer 

BA. University of Delaware 

Kathryn Ramey 

Senior Lecturer 

BA, Evergreen State University 

MFA. Temple University 

Maria Rodriguez 

Senior Lecturer 

BA, University of Virginia 

MFA, Temple University 

Kathy Rose 

Senior Lecturer 

BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 

MFA, California Institute of the Arts 

Peter Rose 

Professor 

BA, City College of New York 

John Serpentelli 

Senior Lecturer 

BFA, MAT, The University of the Arts 

Sandy Sorlien 

Master Lecturer 

BA, Bennington College 

Karl Staven 

Associate Professor 
BA, Yale University 
MA, Harvard University 
MFA. New York University 

Amanda Tinker 

Lecturer 

BS, Drexel University 
MFA, Tyler School of Art, 
Temple University 

Tricia Treacy 

Lecturer 

BA, West Virginia University 

MFA, The University of the Arts 

VldaVJda 

Master Lecturer 

BA, California State University 

MA, California State University 

Wendy Weinberg 

Assistant Professor 

BA, University of Michigan 

MFA, Temple University 



John Woodin 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 
BFA, University of New Orleans 
MFA, Tyler School of Art, 
Temple University 

Ken Yanoviak 

Senior Lecturer 

BA, Temple University 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



53 



Photography 

Alida Fish 

afish@uarts.edu 

Coordinator 

215-717-6303 

This major prepares students for a wide 
range of careers in photography by pro- 
viding a solid grounding in traditional 
photography and digital imaging. In the 
sophomore year, students receive in-depth 
training in craft and ideas fundamental to 
photographic imaging. Technical exercises 
emphasize electronic imaging as well as tra- 
ditional black-and-white and color 
processes. The curriculum covers both 
descriptive photography and more experi- 
mental manipulated image-making. 

During the junior year, students consider 
photographic forms beyond the traditional 
print, such as the photographic book, non- 
silver proces.ses, and installation work. 
Large-format photography and studio prac- 
tice with its control of artificial lighting are 
also part of the junior curriculum. In both 
the junior and senior years, students may 
pursue the study of specialized interests on 
an elective basis, including illustration and 
editorial photography, photojournalism, 
environmental portraiture, creative portfolio 
development, advanced digital imaging, and 
professional practice. 

The senior year is primarily devoted to 
the production of an independent body of 
work of the student's own choosing and 
direction. The senior thesis provides the 
opportunity to begin the process of self- 
definition as photographer and artist. A 
required junior-level course in photographic 
criticism, coupled with required classes in 
the history of photography, exemplifies the 
strong emphasis that the department places 
on critical thinking and self-expression in 
words as well as through photographs. 

Each spring, the Media Arts Department 
hosts the Paradigm Lecture Series, an out- 
standing resource available to photography 
majors. Through this series, photographers 
of national and international reputation are 
invited by the department to visit the 
campus to discuss their work and meet with 
the students. 



Photography 

Bachelorof Fine Arts 123 credits 



Foundatio 


n Credits 


Junior 


Credits 


Fall 


Fall 






FPllO 


Drawing 


3.0 


PF311A 


Jr Photography Workshop I 


3.0 


FP120 


2-D Design 


3.0 


PF313A 


Basic Photography Studio 1 


3.0 


FP 130 


3-D Design 


3.0 


PF315 


Digital Photography 




HUllOA 
HU103A 
Fall Total 
Spring 

Chouse any 
FPlll 
FP121 
FP 131 
FP140 


Electives^ 

First Year Writing I 

Intro, to Modernism 1 


1.5 
3.0 
3.0 
16.5 


HUXXX 
Fall Total 
Spring 

PF311B 


Workshop* 3.0 

Liberal Arts 6.0 

15.0 

Jr. Photography Workshop II 3.0 


three courses: 
Drawing 
2-D Design 
3-D Design 
Time and Motion 


3.0 
3.0 
3.0 
3.0 


PF313B 
PF415A 

HUXXX 
Spring Tota 


Basic Photography Studio I 

Critical Issues in 

Photography 

Electives 

Liberal Arts 


3.0 

3.0 
3.0 
3.0 ■ 
15.0 


HUllOB 


Electives 

First Year Writing II 

Intro, to Modernism II 


1.5 
3.0 
3.0 
16.5 


Junior Year Total 


30.0 


HU103B 


Senior 






Spring Total 


Fall 






Freshman Year Total 


33.0 


PF411A 


Sr. Photography Workshop 


3.0 








PF 4 1 5 B 


Critical Issues in 




Sophomore 






Photography 


3.0 


Fall 








Electives 


3.0 


PF210A 


Intro, to Film I * 


3.0 


HUXXX 


Liberal Arts 


6.0 


PF211A 


Intro, to Photography I 


3.0 


Fall Total 




15.0 


HU140A 
HU255 


Electives 

Art History Survey I 

History of Photography 


3.0 
3.0 
3.0 


Spring 

PF411B 
Select one o 


Sr. Photography Workshop 
f the following three courses: 


3.0 


Fall Total 




15.0 


PF323 


Selected Topics; 




Spring 








Photography 


3.0 


PF211B 


Intro, to Photography II 


3.0 


PF413 


Professional Practices 


3.0 


PF217 


Color Concepts * 


3.0 


PF499 


Internship 


3.0 


HU140B 
HUXXX 

Spring Total 
Sophomore '' 


Electives 

Art History Survey II 

Liberal Arts 

ifear Total 


3.0 
3.0 
3.0 
15.0 
30.0 


Electives 
HUXXX Liberal Arts 
Spring Total 
Senior Year Total 


6.0 
3.0 
15.0 
30.0 




Electives must include nine studio credits 




Liberal Arts 


Distribution 


( 


taken 


Note all Liberal Arts courses are 3.0 credits. 
HUIIOA/B 3cr 3 ck 


outside the Photography offerings. 




HU103A/B 
HUI40A/B 


3 cr 3 cr 
3 cr 3 cr 




* Can be taken either fall or spring semester 


Literature 


3cr 










Humanities 


3cr 










Social Scien 


'e 3 cr 3 cr 










Science/Math 3 cr 










Lib. Arts Electives 3 cr. 3 cr 










m 255 Hist 


ory of Photo. 3 cr 











54 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



Film/Digital Video 

Peter Rose 

prose@uarts.edu 

Coordinator 

215-717-6554 

The Film/Digital Video program in the 
Media Arts Department prepares students to 
work in Narradve. Documentary, and 
Experimental fdmmaking. At the same time, 
a solid preparation and foundation in craft 
has enabled an extremely high percentage of 
our graduates to enter the professional field 
as freelance editors, sound recordists, cine- 
matographers, technicians, animators, 
screenwriters, and directors. 

The Filmmaking major provides students 
with a background in all phases of fdm and 
video production, including film cinematog- 
raphy, videography, fdm and video editing, 
and sound/image manipulation. As in still 
photography, fdmmaking students acquire a 
strong background in criticism, theory, and 
history of media. All FihnA'ideo majors 
pursue at least one pracdcal internship as 
part of the degree requirements. 

The study of fdm and video at the 
University has been supplemented by a 
number of other activities, including the 
Paradigm Lecture Series. Through this 
series, which occurs each spring, fdm and 
video artists of national and international 
reputation visit the campus to conduct lec- 
tures and present screenings of their work. 



Film/Digital Video 

Bachelor of Fine Arts 123 credits 



Foundation 



Credits 



junior 



Credits 



Fall 






Fall 






FPllO 


Drawing 


3.0 


PF310A 


Jr. Cinema Production I 


3.0 


FP120 


2-D Design 


3.0 


WM219 


Writing for Film 


3.0 


FP130 


3-D Design 


3.0 


PF320 


Sine-Sound for 




HUllOA 
HU103A 


Electives 

First Year Writing I 

Intro, to Modernism I 


1.5 
3.0 
3.0 


HUXXX 
Fall Total 


Narrative Film 
Liberal Arts 


3.0 
6.0 
15.0 


Fall Total 




16.5 


Spring 

PF310B 


Jr. Cinema Production II 


3.0 


Spring 






PF324 


Film Forum: Selected Topics 3.0 


Choose am 


three courses: 




PF 322 


Experiments in 




FPlll 
FP121 
FP131 
FP 140 


Drawing 
2-D Design 
3-D Design 
Time and Motion 


3.0 
3.0 
3.0 
3.0 


HUXXX 

Spring Tota 


Advanced Digital Video 

Electives 

Liberal Arts 


3.0 
3.0 
3.0 
15.0 



Electives 1.5 

HUllOB First Year Writing II 3.0 

HU 103 B Intro, to Modernism II 3.0 

Spring Total 16.5 



Freshman Year Total 



33.0 



Sophomore 



Fall 

PF210A Intro, to Film I 3.0 

PF 2 1 1 A Intro, to Photography I 3.0 

WM 25 1 Narrative Cinema I * 3.0 

CM 120 Sound Communication 3.0 

HU 1 40 A Art History Survey I 3.0 

Fall Total 15.0 
Spring 

PF 2 1 B Intro, to Film/Digital Video 3 .0 

PF 2 1 2 B Intro, to Animation II 3.0 

WM252 Narrative Cinema II ** 3.0 

HU140B Art History Survey II 3.0 

HUXXX Liberal Arts 3.0 

Spring Total 15.0 



Sophomore Year Total 



30.0 



Liberal Arts Distribution 

Note all Liberal Arts courses are 3.0 credits. 

HUIWA/B 3cr 3 cr 

HU103A/B 3cr 3 cr 

HU140A/B 3cr 3 cr. 

Literature 3 cr 

Humanities 3 cr 

Social Science 3 cr 3 cr 

Science/Math 3 cr 

Lib. Arts Electives 3 cr 3 cr 

WM 251 Narrative Cinema I 3 cr 



Junior Year Total 



30.0 



Senior 



Fall 

PF410A Sr. Cinema Production I 3.0 
PF 424 Time: 

A Multi-disciplinary Sent. 3.0 

PF499 Internship 3.0 

Electives 3.0 

HUXXX Liberal Arts 3.0 

Fall Total 15.0 
Spring 

PF 4 1 OB Sr, Cinema Production II 3.0 

Electives 6.0 

HUXXX Liberal Arts 6.0 

Spring Total 15.0 



Senior Year Total 



30.0 



Electives must include nine studio credits taken 

outside the Filnt/Video offerings. 

* VJM 251 and WM 252 Narrative Cinema I & II 

are required of all Film/Video majors. 

** WM 252 Narrative Cinema II can be counted 

as a studio elective, humanities, or liberal arts 

elective. 



The tjniversity of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



55 



Animation 

Karl Stave n 

kstaven@uarts.edu 

Coordinator 

215-717-65523 

The Animation program in the Media 
Arts Department prepares students to work 
in computer, traditional, stopmotion, and 
experimental animation. The basic princi- 
ples of animation can be applied to all forms 
of image and object manipulation. The 
program gives its graduates a strong under- 
standing of timing and motion, and a 
grounding in the wide variety of techniques 
available to the animator. Animation majors 
get a solid background in life drawing, tra- 
ditional hand-drawn animation, stop-motion 
and experimental animation, and 2-D and 3- 
D computer animation. Animation majors 
choose the area(s) on which to focus as they 
construct their junior and senior thesis 
fdms. 

This broad-based approach has allowed 
graduates to obtain professional positions in 
both the animation industry and as inde- 
pendent artists. Alumni become computer 
animators, directors, storyboard artists, pro- 
duction assistants, special-effects animators, 
and character designers. 



Animation 

Bachelor of Fine Arts 123 credits 



Foundation 



Credits 



Fall 

FPllO Drawing 3.0 

FP120 2-D Design 3.0 

FP130 3-D Design 3.0 

Electives 1 .5 

HUllOA First Year Writing 1 3.0 

HU 103 A Intro, to Modernism I 3.0 

FallTotal 16.5 
Spring 

Choose any three courses: 

FP 111 Drawing 3.0 

FP121 2-D Design 3.0 

FP131 3-D Design 3.0 

FP 140 Time and Motion 3.0 

Electives 1 .5 

HU 1 10 B First Year Writing II 3.0 

HU103B Intro, to Modernism n 3.0 

Spring Total 16.5 



Freshman Year Total 



33.0 



Sophomore 



Fall 

PF210A 
PF212A 
IL205 

WM251 

HU140A 

Fall Total 

Spring 

PF210B 

PF212B 

PF216 

WM252 

HU140B 

Spring Total 



Intro, to Film 1 
Intro, to Animation I 
Figure Drawing** 
for Animators 
Narrative Cinema I * 
Art History Survey I 



Intro, to Film/Digital Video 
Intro, to Animation II 
Computer Animation I *** 
Narrative Cinema II * 
Art History Survey II 



3.0 
3.0 

3.0 
3.0 
3.0 
15.0 

3.0 
3.0 
3.0 
3.0 
3.0 
15.0 



Sophomore Year Total 



Liberal Arts Distribulion 

Note all Liberal Arts courses are 3.0 credits. 



HUllOA/B 


3cr 


3CK 


HU103A/B 


3cr 


3cr 


HUI40A/B 


3cr 


3cr 


Literature 


3cr 




Humanities 


3cr 




Social Science 


3cr 


3cr 


Science/Math 


3cr 




Lib. Arts Electives 


3cr 


3cr 


WM 251 Narrative 


Cinema I 


3CK 



Junior 



Credits 



Fall 

PF312A 

PF316 

PF325 

HUXXX 

Fall Total 

Spring 

PF312B 

PF327 



HUXXX 
Spring Total 



Jr. Animation Workshop I 
Computer Animation II*** 
Sound Design and Tech. 
Liberal Arts 



3.0 
3.0 
3.0 
6.0 
15.0 



Jr Animation Workshop II 3.0 
Moving Art: Animation Theory3.0 
and Production 

Electives 6.0 

Liberal Arts 3.0 

15.0 



Junior Year Total 



30.0 



Senior 



Fall 

PF4 1 2A Sr Animation Workshop 
Select one course from the following r\\o: 
WM219 Writing for Film 

Time; 

A Multidisciplinary Sem. 

Electives 
Liberal Arts 



PF424 



HUXXX 
Fall Total 
Spring 

PF412B 
PF324 

HUXXX 
Spring Total 



3.0 
3.0 

3.0 

3.0 
6.0 
15.0 



Sr. Animation Workshop 3.0 
Film Forum: Selected Topics 3.0 



Electives 
Liberal Arts 



3.0 
6.0 
15.0 



Senior Year Total 



30.0 



Electives must include nine studio credits taken 
outside the Animation offerings. 
* WM 251 and WM 252 Narrative Cinema I and II 
are required of all Animation majors. WM 252 
Narrative Cinema II can be counted as a studio 
elective. Inunanities. or liberal arts elective. 
**IL 205 fulfills 3 credits of elective requirements. 
*** Can be taken either fall or spring semester 
By the end of the junior year, it is strongly recom- 
mended that Animation majors have taken 
at least one of the following five advanced major 
electives for three studio elective credits: 
IL 202 Figure Drawing 
PF326 Advanced 3-D Computer Animation 
PF 328 Selected Topics in Animation 
PF 330 Clay and Puppet Animation 
PF 33 1 Image and Performance 



56 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



Film/Animation 

Bachelor of Fine Arts 135 credits 



Foundation 



Credits 



Junior 



Credits 



Liberal Arts Distribution 

Note all Liberal Arts courses are 3.0 credits. 



Fall 






Fall 






HUnOA/B 


3cr. 


3cr 


FPllO 
FP120 


Drawing 
2-D Design 


3.0 
3.0 


PF310A 
PF312A 


Jr. Cinema Production I 
Jr. Animation Workshop I 


3.0 
3.0 


HUIOSA/B 
HU140A/B 
Literature 


3cr. 
3cr 
3cr 


3cr 
3cr. 


FP130 


3-D Design 


3.0 


PF316 


Computer Animation II 


3.0 


Humanities 


3cr 










PF320 


Film Sound 


3.0 


Social Science 


3cr 


3cr 




Electives 


1.5 


HU XXX 


Liberal Arts 


6.0 


Science/Math 


3cr 




HUIIOA 


First Year Writing I 


3.0 


Fall Total 




18.0 


Lib. Arts Electives 


3cr 


3cr 


HU 103 A 


Intro, to Modernism 1 


3.0 




\VM 251 Narrative Cinema I 


3cr 


Fall Total 




16.5 


Spring 

PF310B 


Jr. Cinema Production I! 


3.0 








Spring 






PF312B 


Jr Animation Workshop n 


3.0 








Choose any 


three courses: 




PF327 


Moving Art: 










FPlll 


Drawing 


3.0 




Animation Theory 


3.0 








FP121 


2-D Design 


3.0 


PF 322 


Media Technology 


3.0 








FP 131 


3-D Design 


3.0 


HUXXX 


Liberal Arts 


6.0 








FP140 


Time and Motion 


3.0 
1 5 


Spring Total 




18.0 














Junior Year Total 


36.0 








HUllOB 


First Year Writing II 
Intro, to Modernism II 


3.0 
3.0 














HU 103 B 


Senior 









Spring Total 


16.5 


Freshman Year Total 


33.0 


Sophomore 



Fall 

PF210A 
PF211A 
PF212A 
IL 205 

WM251 

HU140A 

Fall Total 

Spring 

PF210B 

PF212B 

PF216 

WM252 

HU140B 

Spring Total 



Intro, to Film I 
Intro, to Photography I 
Intro, to Animation I* 
Figure Drawing 
for Animators* 
Narrative Cinema I** 
Art History Survey I 



Intro, to Film/Digital Video 
Intro, to Animation II 
Computer Animation I* 
Narrative Cinema II** 
Art History Survey II 



3.0 
3.0 
3.0 

3.0 
3.0 
3.0 



3.0 
3.0 
3.0 
3.0 
3.0 
15.0 



Sophomore Year Total 



33.0 



Fall 

PF410A Sr. Cmema Production I 
PF412A Sr. Animation Workshop I 
Select one course from the following two: 
WM219 Writing for Film 
PF424 Time: 

A Multi-disciplinary Sem. 



HUXXX 
Fall Total 
Spring 

PF410B 
PF412B 
PF 324 
PF499 
HUXXX 
Spring Total 



Electives 
Liberal Arts 



Sr. Cinema Production U 
Sr. Animation Workshop II 
Film Forum: Selected Topics 
Internship 
Liberal Arts 



3.0 
3.0 

3.0 

3.0 

3.0 
6.0 
18.0 

3.0 
3.0 
3.0 
3.0 
3.0 
15.0 



Senior Year Total 



Electives must include nine studio credits taken 

outside the Film/Animation offerings. 

* Can be taken either fall or spring semester 

** WM 251 and WM 252 Narrative Cinema I and II 

are required of all Film/Animation majors as part ■ 

of the total Liberal Arts distribution. 



The University of the Arts tJndergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



57 



Art Education 



Barbara Suplee 

bsuplee@uarts.edu 
Chairperson, Director 
215-717-6053 

Pre-Certification 
Concentration in Art 
Education 

The teaching of art is a profession that 
allows for the artist-teacher's continued 
growth while nurturing the aesthetic and 
creative experiences of others. Recent 
national as well as statewide attention to 
education and to the role of the arts in edu- 
cation makes this an especially good time 
for students to consider becoming an art 
teacher and artist. In preparing students for 
careers in art education, the University is 
committed to the ideal of exemplary 
teachers who are also able to produce their 
own competent works. To that end, the 
University offers a flexible program of 
competency-based education at the under- 
graduate level to prepare students to 
complete a professional certification pro- 
gram after graduation or within a 
four-year undergraduate program plus 
an additional post-baccalaureate 
professional semester. 

The Pre-Certification concentration is 
designed to be taken in conjunction with a 
regular studio major in the BFA program. 
In addition to meeting the requirements of 
a major studio department, students 
enrolled in the pre-certification concentra- 
tion take courses in the Art Education 
Department, plus prescribed courses in lib- 
eral arts, photography, electronic media, 
and other studio areas that help fulfill the 
general Liberal Arts and studio electives 
requirements. 

All candidates seeking certification to 
teach K-12 in Pennsylvania must complete 
48 credits including six credits of college- 
level math, three credits of college -level 
English composition, and three credits of 
British or American literature prior to 
formal admission to the professional edu- 
cation program. Careful advising is 
essential. 



Students enrolled in the Pre-Certificafion 
Concentration in Art Education must take 
and pass the Professional Writing Intensive 
course in the first semester of their senior 
year, prior to student teaching in the Post- 
Baccalaureate Student Teacher Program. 
A score of 90 percent or higher is passing. 
Students with scores of 80 to 89 percent 
will be required to obtain remedial tutoring, 
and they must take and pass the depart- 
ment's "Writing Proficiency Exam" before 
they can student teach. Those who score 
below 70 percent may not be admitted to 
the Post-Baccalaureate Student Teacher 
Program. Students may test out of the 
Professional Writing Intensive course by 
taking and passing the department Writing 
Proficiency Exam. Prior to entering the 
Post-Baccalaureate Teacher Program, stu- 
dents must have successfully completed the 
Instructional I PRAXIS tests. 

The Art Education concentration pro- 
vides a strong theoretical and practical 
foundation for teaching as a career. 
Through field experiences starting in the 
sophomore year, the student is able to 
explore teaching in a variety of traditional 
and alternative settings. Students are also 
provided with the necessary competencies 
in teaching K-12 Art, and in meeting the 
state and national standards through special 
studies in education combined with liberal 
arts coursework in art history, aesthetics, 
criticism, social sciences, and studies in 
studio production. 

The Pre-Certification Concentration may 
be taken in its entirety or in part to fit indi- 
vidual plans and needs. Students who 
complete the program will be able to enroll 
directly in the Post-Baccalaureate Teacher 
Program, in which they can complete the 
student-teaching requirement (AE 659, AE 
552) in as littie as one regular semester 
beyond the bachelor's degree. In addition, 
students must successfully complete the 
PRAXIS required tests, with satisfactory 
scores to qualify for the Pennsylvania 
Instructional I Certificate to teach Art K-12. 

In another viable alternative, qualified 
graduates may enter the Master of Arts in 
Teaching program, in which it is possible to 
earn a master's degree and certification in 
as little as three semesters or two semesters 
and two summers. 



Academic Regulations 

SUidents working toward certification are 
required to maintain a 3.0 cumulative 
average in certification coursework. 
Admission to the Post-Baccalaureate 
Student Teacher Program is by permission 
of the department, based on satisfactory 
completion of all prerequisites, evidence of 
promise as a teacher demonstrated in prior 
coursework, and good academic standing. 
Students must maintain a "B" average in art 
education courses to be permitted to sUident 
teach. A grade of "B" or better in the 
Student Teaching Practicum is required for 
recommendation for certification. 

Art Education Faculty 

Paul Adorno 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 
AB, Georgetown University 
MSEd, University of Pennsylvania 

Raye Cohen 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 

BA, University of Pennsylvania 

MA, The University of the Arts 

Diane Foxman 

Senior Lecturer 

BA, Antioch College 

MA, Goddard College 

Arlene Gostin 

Associate Professor 

BA, University of Delaware 

MA, Philadelphia College of Art 

June Julian 

Associate Professor 

BS, Kutztown University 

MEd The Pennsylvania State University 

EdD, New York University 

Maria Lengauer 

Senior Lecturer 

BFA, Philadelphia College of 

Art and Design 
MAT, The University of the Arts 

Slavl<o Milel<ic 

Associate Professor 

MSc. MD, Belgrade University, 

Yugoslavia 
PhD, University of Connecticut 



58 The University of IheAns Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



Janis Norman 

Professor 

BAE, University of Kansas 

MA. University of Missouri. Kansas City 

PhD. University of Kansas 

Susan Rodriguez 

Adjunct Professor 
BFA. MEd. Tyler School of Art, 
Temple University 

Barbara Suplee 

Associate Professor 

BFA, West Chester University 

MEd, Tyler School of Art. 

Temple University 
PhD, Pennsylvania State University 

JoAnn Wright 

Senior Lecturer 

BA, Rutgers University 

BA, Rowan University 



Pre-Certification 
in Art Education 



Foundation 



Credits 



Fall 




FPllO 


Drawing 


FP120 


2-D Design 


FP 130 


3-D Design 




Electives 


HUllOA 


First Year Writing I 


HU103A 


Intro, to Modernism I 


Fall Total 




Spring 




Choose cun 


tliree courses: 


FPlll 


Drawing 


FP121 


2-D Design 


FP131 


3-D Design 


FP140 


Time and Motion 



Electives 
HUllOB First Year Writing II 
HU 103 B Intro, to Modernism II 
Spring Total 



Freshman Year Total 



Sophomore 



Sophomore Year Total 



3.0 
3.0 
3.0 

1.5 
3.0 
3.0 
16.5 



3.0 
3.0 
3.0 
3.0 

1.5 
3.0 
3.0 
16.5 



AE200 


Presentation Skills 


1.0 


AE201 


Introduction to 






Visual Arts Education 


2.0 


HU18I* 


Child and Adolescent 






Psychology 


3.0 




Math 


6.0 




British/American Lit. 


3.0 



15.0 



AE533 


Art and Inclusionary Ed. 3.0 


AE547-^ 


Program Design and Methods: 




Elementary 3.0 


AE547 


Prog. Design: Elementary 3.0 


HUI62 


Individual and Society 3.0 


HU270 


Intro, to Aesthetics or 


AE549 


Program Design and Methods: 




Aesthetics/ Art Criticism 3.0 


HU357 


Modem Art (preferred) 




or a Discipline Art History 3.0 



Senior 



AE 599* 



AE 559-h 
AE 548+ 



Professional Writing 
Intensive 2.0 

Saturday Practicum 3.0 

Program Design and Methods: 
Secondary 3.0 



Senior Year Total 



6,0 



Students must successfully complete the 
Instructional I PRAXIS tests prior to entering the 
Post-Baccalaureate Teacher Program. 



Post-Baccalaureate Teacher Program 
Credits 



AE 552 
AE659■^-^ 



The Art of Teaching 3.0 

Student Teaching Practicum 9.0 



Post Baccalaureate Total 



lunior Year Total 



15.0 



* These courses also count toward the liberal arts 
core of the bachelor's degree. 

***AE 599 is required of students who do not pass 
the Art Education Department Writing Proficiency 
Exam. It does notfidfill any requirements for pre- 
certification or the bachelor's degree. 

+These courses have a required field placement. 

++ The Student Teaching Practicum consists of two 
4.5-credit components: a seven-week elementary 
field placement and a seven-week secondary field 
placement. The two field placements may be taken 
over two semesters. If this option is elected, the full 
15-week seminar that accompanies the Practicum 
must be taken in both semesters 

Required Studio Electives 
Pre-Certification students should complete at least 
three upper level credits in a two-dimensional 
medium if their major is in a three-dimensional 
area, and vice versa. Other studio work must 
include at least one course each in photography, 
computer with graphics applications, painting, 
drawing, ceramics, and printmaking. 

AE 533. AE 547. AE 548. andAE 559fidfillAn 
Education and studio elective rt^uirements outside 
of the major program. 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



59 



Art Therapy 



Karen Clark-Schock 

kcschock@uarts.edu 

Director 

215-717-6236 

Concentration in Art Therapy 

Art therapy, a well-respected discipline 
within the human services profession. 
offers an exciting career opportunity for the 
studio art major. It utilizes art as a non- 
verbal means of communication and 
self-expression, and thereby provides a cre- 
ative vehicle through which to explore 
personal problems as well as personal 
strengths and potentials. Art therapy recog- 
nizes that the entire art process, how it 
unfolds, the drawn forms and content, as 
well as the verbal associations, are all 
reflections of the individual client. 

Art therapists work with children and 
adults of all ages in a variety of settings. 
These include psychiatric and medical hos- 
pitals, schools, clinics, community centers, 
nursing homes, and drug and alcohol treat- 
ment clinics. As members of a team, art 
therapists may work with physicians, psy- 
chiatrists, psychologists, social workers, 
and educators. The art therapist uses art- 
work for both diagnosis and treatment. Art 
therapy may also be utilized as a means of 
promoting creativity and wellness, and may 
therefore be viewed as a force in the pre- 
vention of illness. 

While enrolled in one of the BFA pro- 
grams within the College, students may 
also elect a concentration in Art Therapy. 
This concentration introduces them to the 
discipline on the undergraduate level. This 
concentration gives students a chance to 
explore a career option while they are 
. engaged in undergraduate study. 

Students who do not wish to pursue the 
professional degree will nonetheless find 
that their study of art therapy is beneficial 
in other fields, particularly in education, 
and in their own personal development. 

StiideiUs who elect the An Therapy pro- 
gram take four designated courses in 
psychok)gy and five courses in art therapy, 
each of which meets overall requirements 
toward the Bachelor of Fine Arts. At gradu- 
ation. Art Therapy Concentration students 
receive a certificate of completion in Art 
Therapy along with the Bachelor of Fine 
Arts degree. 



The Hahnemann Creative Arts 
in Therapy Program at Drexel 
University 

Students interested in applying to The 
Hahnemann Creative Arts in Therapy 
Program at Drexel University for a master's 
degree in Art Therapy have the advantage 
of studying with faculty who teach in both 
the UArts and Hahnemann therapy pro- 
grams. Course content and experience in 
the UArts undergraduate program provides 
excellent credentials for graduate study 
and, in particular, educational continuity 
with the graduate program at Drexel 
University. 

Art Therapy Faculty 

Karen Clark-Schock 

Adjunct Associate Professor 
BA, Rosemont College 
MCAT, Hahnemann University 
PsyD, Immaculata College 

Nancy Gerber 

Senior Lecturer 

BS, Pennsylvania State University 

MS, Hahnemann University 

Susan Kaye-Huntington 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 
BA, New York University 
MCAT, Hahnemann University 
PsyD, Immaculata College 



60 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



Art Therapy 
Concentration 



Foundatic 


m 


Credits 


Junior 


Credits 


Fall 


Fall 






FPllO 


Drawing 


3.0 


AT 300 


Intro, to Art Therapy 


3.0 


FP120 


2-D Design 


3.0 


HU384 


Abnormal Psychology 


3.0 


FP130 


3-D Design 


3.0 


Fall Total 




6.0 




Electives 


1.5 


Spring 






HUllOA 


First Year Writing I 


3.0 


AT 301 


Social and Group Process 


3.0 


HU103A 


Intro, to Modernism I 


3.0 


AT 304 


Theories and Techniques of 




Fall Total 




16.5 




Art Therapy with 




Spring 

Choose an\ 


three courses: 




Spring Total 


Children and Adolescents 


3.0 
6.0 


FPlll 


Drawing 


3.0 


Junior Year Total 


12.0 


FP PI 


2-D Design 
3-D Design 
Time and Motion 


30 








FP131 


3.0 
3.0 


Senior 






FP140 


Fall 






HUllOB 
HU 103 B 


Electives 

First Year Writing n 

Intro, to Modernism 


1.5 
3.0 
3.0 


AT 305 
HU 483 


Theories and Techniques of 
Art Therapy with Adults 
Theories of Personality 


3.0 
3.0 


Spring Total 




16.5 


Fall Total 




6.0 


Freshman Year Total 


33.0 


Spring 

AT 401 
Spring Total 


Senior Practicum 


3.0 


Sopliomore 




3.0 


HU181A 


Child and Adolescent 




Senior Year Total: 


9.0 




Psychology 
Adult Psychology 


3.0 
3.0 








HU181B 




Art Therapy Courses 


15.0 










Liberal Arts Courses 


12.0 


Sophomore 


Year Total 


6.0 



The University of ttie Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



6i 



College of Art and Design 
Graduate Programs 

Carol Moore 

cmoore@uarts.edu 
Graduate Coordinator 
215-717-6106 

Graduate study in the College of Art and Design provides 
intensive professional preparation in a stimulating multi-arts envi- 
ronment. A select range of specialized graduate degrees in Fine Arts, 
Design, and Visual Arts Education features focused curricula, small 
classes, dedicated faculty, and access to outstanding facilities and 
resources. 

All programs address interarts and/or interdisciplinary issues 
through both studio activity and the University Seminars on 
"Structure and Metaphor," and "Art and Society." which bring stu- 
dents together from all graduate programs at the College of Art and 
Design. Additionally, all MFA students take the University 
Seminar on "Criticism." 

A University of the Arts education extends beyond the classroom 
and studio. Through partnerships, workshops, residencies, intern- ■ 
ships, and symposia, students engage the larger art, design, 
and education communities and interact with some of today's 
most important artists, designers, and educators in a broad 
range of disciplines. 

The College of Art and Design offers these graduate programs: 
Master of Fine Arts degrees in Book Arts/Printmaking, Museum 
Exhibition Planning and Design; low-residency summer Master of 
Fine Arts degrees in Ceramics, Painting, or Sculpture; Master of 
Industrial Design; Master of Arts in Art Education; Master of Arts in 
Museum Communication; Master of Arts in Museum Education; 
Master of Arts in Teaching in Visual Arts. 

Student Classification and 
Course Load 

Graduate students must be enrolled for at least nine credits to be 
considered full-time. Tuition for part-time graduate students is 
charged on a per-credit basis. 
Graduate student class status is determined as follows: 
Gl up to 17.5 credits 

G2 18 credits or more 

Graduate Thesis Requirements 

CAD graduate programs require each graduate student to meet 
specific thesis requirements. The requirements may include a thesis 
exhibition or project, and should be successfully completed once the 
student has fulfilled all other program requirements. Students must 
submit three copies of their thesis to their program director in order 
to qualify for the degree. One copy of the thesis remains with the 
department and two are submitted to the Greenfield Library. 



Thesis Grading 



The grade of "IP" ("In Progress") signifies that the student is 
making satisfactory progress toward completing the graduate thesis. 
This grade will apply only to graduate thesis courses where the stu- 
dent's thesis is still in progress. 
This grade is available only for the following courses: 

AE 649 Graduate Project/Thesis 

MS 749 A/B Thesis Development 

ID 749 Master's Thesis Documentation 

FA 795 MFA Thesis Exhibition 

MU 603 Graduate Project/Recital 

An "IP" grade acknowledges the fact that the final course product 
(thesis) may require some period of time past the semester of regis- 
trafion to complete. The "IP" grade will remain on the student's 
record until a final thesis grade is submitted by the instructor. In 
some cases, a student will be registered for thesis courses as a 
sequence (e.g., MS 749 A/B). When the final grade is submitted by 
the instructor, it will replace the "IP" grade. The "IP" grade is not 
computed in the grade-point average. 

In order to remain in good standing while the thesis is "in 
progress," the student must register for the thesis continuation fee 
for each semester he or she is not enrolled in coursework. 

Graduate Project/Thesis 
Continuation Fee 

A student who has completed all the course requirements for the 
master's degree and is currently working on the graduate thesis, 
either on or off-campus, must register and pay a graduate thesis con- 
tinuation fee per semester until the thesis is completed and accepted. 
This registration, through the Office of the Registrar, is required in 
each succeeding semester, excluding the summer sessions, until all 
degree requirements are met. Students completing a degree in the 
summer must pay the thesis fee in the final summer semester. 

Leave of Absence 

A graduate student may take a leave of absence prior to the com- 
pletion of all coursework and with the program director's approval. 
Students may take a maximum of two one-semester leaves of 
absence throughout their course of study, either in sequence or as 
needed. Once the thesis has begun and all coursework has been com- 
pleted, students must register and pay for the thesis continuation fee 
for successive semesters and are not eligible for a leave of absence. 

SUMFA students are limited to one off-semester leave of absence 
between the first and third summers. If a longer leave of absence is 
necessary, the student will be asked to take a full year's leave of 
absence. 



62 



The University of the Ans Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



Graduate Double Degree Policies 

Graduate students already enrolled in a master's degree program 
at the University of the Arts may apply to simultaneously pursue a 
second master's degree. A second degree may be added only after 
the successful completion of at least one semester of graduate study, 
with a grade-point average of at least 3.0. Students who are inter- 
ested in this option must be aware that completion of two degrees 
will likely require additional time and requires intensive advising 
and coordination of requirements. 

Students currently enrolled in a master's degree program who 
wish to pursue a second master's degree must request, in writing, 
that the Registrar forward a copy of their transcript and official file 
to the director of the program to which they are seeking admission. 
The director of the second program may require the student to 
submit materials for portfolio review, and may require additional let- 
ters of reference. The director of each graduate program is 
responsible for coordinating any required portfolio review. Portfolio 
requirements are listed on the Graduate Application or may be 
obtained directly from the graduate director or coordinator. Final 
acceptance into a double degree program must be approved by the 
Director of Graduate Programs. 

' 1 . A student may be awarded a particular degree from the 
University only once; i.e., once the student has earned an MA, he or 
she may not be awarded another MA. 

2. A student may not receive two different master's degrees from 
the same program; i.e., he or she cannot pursue both the MA in Art 
Education and MAT in Visual Arts. 

3. A student may earn up to two master's degrees, either simulta- 
neously or sequentially. 

4. If a student is approved for a double degree, and six credits are 
shared between the two programs, the student may transfer a max- 
imum of six additional credits from an accredited institution. 

5. A student who has completed one degree and wishes to matric- 
ulate in another does so by applying to the new program through the 
Office of Admission. 

6. Students in the Summer MFA program who wish to pursue a 
second graduate degree will be charged the regular graduate tuition 
rate in the semesters in which they are pursuing two degrees. 



Summer Graduate Electives Policy 

Students wishing to complete studio or liberal arts electives 
during University summer sessions may review pre-approved 
summer course offerings in the spring with their program advisor 
and may register for these courses only after obtaining approval and 
the signature of the CAD Graduate Coordinator. A maximum of six 
credits is transferrable to the graduate curriculum. 

Degree Candidacy and Completion 

Midway through their respective programs, graduate students' 
progress in their discipline and proposal for thesis will be reviewed 
by the appropriate Graduate Committee to formally determine 
whether a student becomes a degree candidate, and is ready to con- 
tinue toward development and completion of the thesis or graduate 
project. 

Graduate students have up to seven years from matriculation date 
to complete a two-year master's program, and up to six years from 
matriculation date to complete a one-year program. 

Credit Duplication 

No course, including graduate courses, which has satisfied under- 
graduate degree requirements, may be counted again for graduate 
credit. 

Transfer Credit 

A maximum of six credits of graduate credit may be transferred 
and applied toward the graduate degree requirements upon approval 
of the program director. All transfer credits must be graduate level 
classes or upper-level undergraduate classes taken for graduate 
credit at an accredited college or university, approved by the 
Registrar and the Graduate Director, and must be a "B" or higher 
grade. 

Studio courses must be 300-level for graduate credit. Two hun- 
dred level courses may be taken with justification from the director 
and written approval from the Graduate Coordinator. Art Education 
Competency may be taken as an independent study. 



Probation and Dismissal Policies 

A cumulative GPA of 3.0 is required for good standing and for 
graduation for graduate students. If a student is unable to achieve a 
semester or cumulative GPA of 3.0. he or she will be placed on pro- 
bation. If a 3.0 GPA and/or other conditions are not attained by the 
following semester, the student will be dismissed from the program. 
While on probation, a student will be ineligible to hold a graduate 
assistantship or to receive a University supplemental grant-in-aid 
or scholarship. 



The University of the Ans Utidergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



63 



Post-Baccalaureate Options 

Crafts Studio Certificate Program 

A Post-Baccalaureate Portfolio Development 
Program 

The University's 30-credit certificate program offers an intensely 
focused education in crafts. The program is designed for those stu- 
dents with bachelor's degrees who wish to become proficient artists 
in one or more of the following areas: ceramics, fibers, glass, jew- 
elry, metal-smithing, or wood. Courses dealing with technique, 
philosophy, and contemporary issues are aimed to develop an indi- 
vidual's portfolio for further graduate study or a career as an 
independent studio artist or design professional. 

The Crafts Studio Program offers the studio component of the 
University's undergraduate crafts program in a focused one-and- 
one-half or two-year period. Students accepted to the program take a 
minimum of 7.5 credits to a maximum of 12 credits per semester 

Certificate students must take a minimum of 12 media-specific 
credits at the 300 course level. The prerequisite for 300-level courses 
is two 200-level courses in that same medium. However, if an appli- 
cant's portfolio indicates enough experience in a particular medium, 
200-level prerequisites may be waived at the time of acceptance. See 
the preceding section for a listing of media-specific courses. 

Certificate students benefit from taking courses with degree can- 
didates in a quality undergraduate program. In addition to 
technically oriented, media-specific courses, students take core 
courses involving design/theory issues, crificism, and 
professional/career practices. 

Admission is by portfolio and interview. Students with little or no 
formal art training will be required to take Foundation courses. The 
program advisor (in consultation with the student) will set the 
number of required prerequisites. These may be taken in advance of 
or concurrently with the certificate program. 



Post -Baccalaureate Teacher Program 

Pre-Certlfication Concentration in Art 
Education, Professional Semester (for UArts 
alumni only) 

The Post-Baccalaureate Teacher Program, Professional Semester, 
is an intensive one-semester experience built around a fourteen- 
week student teaching practicum, in which the student devotes seven 
weeks to teaching at the elementary school level and seven weeks to 
teaching at the middle or secondary school level under the guidance 
and supervision of master teachers and Art Education Department 
faculty. 

The Post-Baccalaureate Teacher Program, Professional Semester, 
is only available to University of the Arts/College of Art and Design 
students the semester following receipt of the bachelor's degree, 
which must include all pre-certification requirements except AE 552 
and AE 659. Students must also have a 3.0 GPA, have successfully 
completed the instructional I Praxis Tests, and be recommended by 
the Art Education department. 

Prior to teaching in the Post-Baccalaureate Teacher Program, stu- 
dents must take the AE 599 Professional Writing course or pass the 
Professional Writing Proficiency Exam with a score of 90 percent or 
higher. Those who score below 70 percent on the Professional 
Writing Proficiency Exam after completing the Professional Writing 
Intensive course may not be admitted to the Post-Baccalaureate 
Student Teacher Program, Professional Semester. 

The Pre-Certification Concentration, when coupled with the Post- 
Baccalaureate Teacher Program, is accredited by the Pennsylvania 
Department of Education as an approved program to prepare stu- 
dents to receive the Instructional I Certificate to teach Art K-12. 

Since June 1987, all applicants for certification in Pennsylvania 
must also take and pass all required tests in the PRAXIS Series, 
Professional Assessments for Beginning Teachers of the National 
Teachers Exam to qualify for the certificate. 

Supplementary courses and activities complete the preparation of 
the future teacher to enter the profession. 



Post-Baccalaureate Teacher Program, Professional Semester 
Credits 



AE552 
AE659 



The Art of Teaching 
Student Teaching Practicum 



3.0 
9.0 



Post Baccalaureate Total 



64 



sity of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



Post- Baccalaureate Teacher Program 

(Non-Degree for non-UArts graduates) 

The Post-Baccalaureate Teacher Program (Non-Degree) is an 
intensely focused course of study designed to prepare those seeking 
certification to teach Art K-12. To be eligible for this 30-credit 
program, candidates must hold a BFA or BA degree in art, or equiv- 
alent, with four credits in studio art and 12 credits in art history, with 
a "B" or better cumulative average. They must also have completed 
six credits in college-level math, three credits of English composi- 
tion, and three credits in American or British literature. In addition 
candidates must have successfully completed the Instructional I, 
PRAXIS tests. Depending on the student's background and all co- 
requisites being met, this 30-credit program may be completed in 
three full semesters. 



Post-Baccalaureate Teacher Program (Non-Degree) 


Credits 


Fall 






AE559* 


Professional Writing Intensive 


2.0 


AE200 


Presentation Skills 


1.0 


AE201 


Introduction to Visual Arts Education 


2.0 


AE547+ 


Program Design and Methods: Elementary 


3.0 


AE 550 


Creative and Cognitive Development 


3.0 


Fad Total 




9.0 


Spring 






AE 548+ 


Program Design and Methods: 






Middle and Secondary 


3.0 


AE533+ 


Art and Inclusionary Education 


3.0 


AE 559+ 


Saturday Practicum 


3.0 


Spring Total 




9.0 


Fall 






AE552 


The Art ot Teaching 


3.0 


AE649 


Student Teaching Practicum 


9.0 


Fall Total 




12.0 


Post Baccalaureate Total (Non-Degree) 


30.0 



*AE 599 is required of students who do not pass out of the Art Education 
Department Writing Proficiency Exam. It does not fulfill any requirements for 
pre-certification, AE 599 must be taken and passed in the first semester of 
enrollment. (See course description for additional information.) Those who 
score below 70 percent on the Professional Writing Proficiency Exam after 
completing the Professional Writing course may not continue in the Post- 
Baccalaureate Teacher Program (Non-Degree). 

+ These courses have a required field placement. 

No credits earned in the Post-Baccalaureate Teacher Program (Non-Degree) 
may be converted to graduate credits or be considered for transfer credit in a 
graduate program. 



Ttie University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



65 



Art Education 

Master of Arts 



Barbara Suplee 

bsiiplee@uarts.edu 
Chairperson, Director 
215-717-6053 

The Master of Arts in Art Education pro- 
gram at The University of the Arts is 
designed to develop the studio, intellectual, 
and professional education background of 
art educators, enabling them to meet 
advanced professional goals. 

Coordinating professional education 
courses with work in liberal arts, graduate 
research, and a concentration in studio arts 
that include emerging digital and alternative 
media, the MA in Art Education Program 
offers custom-designed programs of study to 
meet individual needs. A series of graduate 
education seminars address historical and con- 
temporary issues in art theory, criticism, and 
education. Drawing on the wide range of 
studio departments, nearly half of the program 
is reserved for work in one or more smdio 
areas, museum studies, or liberal arts 
depending upon the student's particular back- 
ground and career needs. The independent 
thesis or graduate project, which is normally 
completed in two semesters, may take the 
form of either an academic research paper or a 
graduate project in an appropriate format. 

Designed for both established and new 
teachers, the degree may satisfy credit 
accrual requirements for pemianent certifi- 
cation or lead to other career advancement. 
Graduates have also found the program rele- 
vant to positions in museum education, 
college (especially junior college) teaching, 
arts administration, educational media, and 
other related fields. Applicants must hold a 
bachelor's degree or equivalent with no 
fewer than 40 credits in studio work and 12 
credits in art history with a "B" or better 
cumulative average. A teaching certificate is 
not required. Students not holding degrees 
in the visual arts can expect to complete 18 
credits of foundation studies and/or up to 40 
credits of studio work, depending upon fac- 
ulty review of their portfolio. 

The degree may also be taken in conjunc- 
tion with the Certification Program in Art 
Education, thereby allowing the student to 
earn a master's degree plus Certification. 
The difference between this combination 
and the MAT (Master of Arts in Teaching), 
is the concentration in graduate studio work 



and the research and thesis required for the 
MA degree. Full-time students may com- 
plete the MA program in one academic year 
plus a summer or three semesters. Part-time 
students may take coursework over as many 
as five years. Depending on the needs of the 
individual student, professional education 
courses and selected studio arts and liberal 
arts courses may be taken in the evenings 
and summers. 

Master of Arts Faculty 

Paul Adorno 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 
AB, Georgetown University 
MSEd, University of Pennsylvania 

Raye Cohen 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 
BA, University of Pennsylvania 
MA, The University of the Arts 

Anne El-Omami 

Associate Professor 

BFA, BA, University of Nebraska, 

Lincoln 
MA, University of Nebraska 

Diane Foxman 

Senior Lecturer 

BA. Antioch University 

MA, Goddard College 

Arlene Gostin 

Associate Professor 

BA, University of Delaware ' 

MA, Philadelphia College of Art 

June Julian 

Associate Professor 

BS, Kutztown University 

MEd, The Pennsylvania State University 

EdD, New York University 

Maria Lengauer 

Lecturer 

BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 

and Design 
MAT, The University of the Arts 

Slavko Milekic 

Associate Professor 

MSc, MD, Belgrade University, 

Yugoslavia 
PhD, University of Connecticut 



Carol Moore 

Associate Professor 
BFA, MFA, Tyler School of Art, 
Temple University 

Janis Norman 

Professor 

BAE, University of Kansas 

MA, University of Missouri, Kansas City 

PhD, University of Kansas 

Susan Rodriguez 

Adjunct Professor 
BFA, MEd, Tyler School of Art, 
Temple University 

Barbara Suplee 

Associate Professor 

BFA, West Chester University 

MEd, Temple University 

PhD, Pennsylvania State University 

JoAnn Wright 

Senior Lecturer 

BA, Rutgers University 

BA, Rowan University 






66 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



Art Education 

Master of Arts 



36 credits 



Summer 



Credits 



Studio Electives 3.0 

Liberal Arts Elective 3.0 

Summer Total 6.0 



Fall 


AE 599* 


Professional Writing 






Intensive 


2.0 


AE606 


Research in Education: 






Methods and Trends 


3.0 


GR691 


University Seminar: 






Structure and Metaphor 


3.0 


AE610 


Graduate Studio Seminar 


3.0 




Electives 


6.0 


Fall Total 




15.0 


Spring 


AE602 


History of Ideas in 






Art and Museum Education 


3.0 


AE649** 


Graduate Project/Thesis 


6.0 


GR692 


University Seminar: 






Art and Design in Society 


3.0 




Electives 


3.0 


Spring Total 




15.0 


Total Credit 




36,0 



*AE 599 is required of students who do not pass 
the Art Education Department Writing Proficiency 
Exam. It must be talien and passed in the first 
semester of enrollment, and does not fulfill any 
credit requirements for the MA program. (See 
course description for additional information.) 

**AE 649 Graduate Project/Thesis may be taken 
as a six-credit block or in two three-credit blocks. 
To remain in good standing while the thesis is "in- 
progress." students must register for the thesis con- 
tinuation fee for each semester they are not 
enrolled in coursework. Students must be registered 
for the semester in which they defend their thesis, 
and imtil the thesis is completed and bound copies 
are submitted to the Art Education Department. 



Tlie Univereity of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 (yj 



Concentration in 
Educational Media 

Barbara Suplee 

bsuplee@uarts.edu 
Chairperson, Director 
215-717-6053 

The Concentration in Educational Media, 
as part of a Master of Arts in Art Education, 
is designed to prepare graduate students to 
use, plan, and manage technology in the 
K- 12 art curriculum and classroom. 
Educational media are those digital tools and 
applications used for creative and instruc- 
tional purposes within a K-12 classroom and 
school setting. The use of educational media, 
therefore, is not solely for developing cre- 
ative expression in students, but also as a 
means to support the teaching and learning of 
K-12 art. 

Candidates for this Concentration are 
students with a background and training in 
both technology and art who want to inte- 
grate the use of technology into the teaching 
of art. Students in the Master of Arts in Art 
Education program who complete this 
Concentration will serve as classroom art 
teachers integrating technology into their cur- 
riculum and practice, and as technology 
leaders in their school and district. 

Requirements 

A Master of Arts in Art Education major 
must complete a total of 12 credits in 
required core and elective courses in tech- 
nology for a Concentration in Educational 
Media. The other remaining six credits may 
be elective courses that the student chooses 
to advance his or her study of technology. 
In addition to these 12 credits toward a 
Concentration in Educational Media, the 
graduate thesis/project (six credits) will be 
directed toward research involving the use of 
technology in art education. Competencies 
and specific requirements for the Educational 
Media Concentration are the following: 



Technology Competencies 

To acquire the following basic competen- 
cies in technology, a student may take 
University technology courses, workshops, 
and tutorials, including those offered through 
the Continuing Studies Professional Institute 
for Educators. Based on a review of portfolio 
and approval by the Art Education 
Department, a graduate student may be 
excused from this requirement. 

• Macintosh and Windows operating 

environments 

• Navigation, menu, file management, 

and transfer and storage skills 

• Productivity skills 

(word processing and spreadsheet) 

• Navigational and information search 

and retrieval skills 

(Internet and World Wide Web) 

• Electronic presentation skills 

(PowerPoint, etc.) 

• Computer graphics knowledge, 

concepts, and skills 

(raster vector and Web graphics) 

Required Core Courses 

Two related semester courses form the 
required core of the Concentration in 
Educational Media A: Teaching and 
Learning, and Educational Media B: 
Planning and Management. These two core 
courses are designed to be taken together as a 
year-long sequence. Educational Media A: 
Teaching and Learning focuses on the con- 
ceptual, curricular, and instructional 
approaches and strategies needed to integrate 
digital technologies into the K-12 art class- 
room. Educational Media B: Planning and 
Management examines the issues and topics 
related to designing technology environments 
for K-12 art education. 

Elective Courses 

The purpose of the elective courses is to 
give the student concentrating in Educational 
Media the opportunity to explore specific 
interests involving technology. To that end, 
six credits must be used for further explo- 
ration in technology-related courses from the 
University. 

Thesis/Project 

A student in the Master of Arts in Art 
Education program with a Concentration in 
Educational Media will focus on a topic or 
idea related to technology in art education as 
part of his or her graduate thesis/project. The 
thesis/project in technology will be the cul- 
mination of study for a Concentration in 
Educational Media. 



Art Education 

Master of Arts with a 
Concentration in 
Educational Media 36 credits 



Fall 


Credits 


AE599* 


Professional Writing 






Intensive 


2.0 


AE507 


Educational Media A: 






Teaching and Learning 


3.0 


GR691 


University Seminar: 






Structure and Metaplior 


3.0 


AE606 


Research in Art Education: 






Methods and Trends 


3.0 




Elective (technology-based) 


3.0 


Fall Total 




12.0* 


Spring 


AE509 


Educational Media B: 






Planning and Management 


3.0 


AE602 


History of Ideas in 






Art and Museum Education 


3.0 


GR692 


University Seminar: 






Art and Design in Society 


3.0 




Elective (technology-based) 


3.0 


Spring Tota 




12.0 


Fall 


AE 530 


Interactive Media for 






Art and Museum Educators 


3.0 


AE610 


Graduate Studio Seminar 


3.0 


AE 649** 


Graduate Project/Thesis 


6.0 


Fall Total 




12.0 


Total Credit 




36.0 



*AE 599 is required of students who do not pass the 
Art Education department Writing Proficiency Exam. 
It must be talien and passed in the first semester of 
enrollment and it does notfidfill any credit require- 
ments for the MA. If a student must take AE 599, 
his/lier semester will include a total of 14 credits. 
**AE 649 Graduate Project/Thesis may be taken as 
a six-credit block or in tnv 3-credit blocks. To 
remain in good standing while the thesis is "in- 
progress," students must register for the thesis con- 
tinuation fee for each semester they are not enrolled 
in coursework. Students must be registered for the 
semester in which they defend their thesis, aitd until 
the thesis is completed and bound copies are sub- 
mitted to the Art Education Department. 



68 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



Visual Arts 

Master of Arts in 
Teaching 

Barbara Suplee 

bsuplee@uarts.edu 
Chairperson, Director 
215-717-6053 

The Master of Arts in Teaching in Visual 
Arts is a professional degree program incor- 
porating preparation for the Pennsylvania 
Instructional I Certificate to teach Art K- 12, 
including a student teaching practicum. 
Additional coursework includes the history, 
theory, and practice of art education. 
Depending on the completeness of the stu- 
dent's background, the MAT Program 
provides a flexible mix of professional edu- 
cation, advanced studio, and liberal arts 
study in a 42-credit program that may be 
completed in three full semesters or two 
semesters and two summers. 

MAT candidates must successfully com- 
plete the Instructional I PRAXIS tests by 
the end of their first semester Although the 
program normally leads to certification 
upon receiving the degree, all candidates 
must, in addition, successfully complete all 
the required PRAXIS tests with satisfactory 
scores to qualify for State certification. This 
unique degree program allows a student to 
obtain his/her certification requirements for 
teaching while also earning a master's 
degree recognized by potential employing 
school districts and educational institutions. 
In many cases this enables the MAT recip- 
ient to qualify for a higher salary and often 
preferred placement. 

Applicants to the MAT Program should 
possess a BFA or BA degree in studio art 
with a minimum of 45 credits in studio and 
12 credits in art history with a "B" or better 
cumulative average. They must have com- 
pleted six credits of college-level math, 
three credits of college-level English com- 
position and three credits of British or 
American literature prior to formal admis- 
sion to the professional education program. 

Applicants must also have satisfactorily 
completed the coursework and/or acquired 
competencies in fields relating to teacher 
certification described below. If any defi- 
ciencies exist, up to 16 corequisite credits 
may be completed concurrently with the 
degree and applied to elective requirements. 



Corequisites: 

• Coursework in painting, drawing, 
ceramics, and printmaking 

• Three upper-division credits in a 3-D 
studio area, if a 2-D studio major for 
bachelor's degree 

• Three upper-division credits in a 2-D 
studio area, if a 3-D studio major for 
bachelor's degree 

• Introduction to computers, preferably 
including graphic applications (required 
competency); minimum requirement of 
one course 

• Basic Photography (required compe- 
tency ), minimum requirement of one 
course 

• Art History, 12 credits, including at 
least one course in 20th century art, one 
course in non-Western art 

• Introduction to Psychology or 
Child and Adolescent Psychology 

• Sociology or Cultural Anthropology 
(may be satisfied by GR 692) 

• Aesthetics (may be satisfied by GR 691 
orAE549) 

• Art Criticism 

(may be satisfied by GR 691 or AE 549) 

• Speech or Acting 

(may be satisfied by AE 200 
Presentation Skills) 

• Six credits college-level math (prior to 
entry to the MAT program) 

• Three credits college-level English 
composition (prior to entry to the MAT 
program) 

• Three credits college-level British or 
American literature (prior to entry into 
the MAT program) 

• AE 201 Introduction to Visual Arts 
Education 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



69 



Visual Arts 

Master of Arts in Teaching 

42 credits 



Summer 



Credits 



AE550** Creative and Cognitive 

Development 3.0 

AE 602** History of Ideas in 

Art and Museum Education 3.0 
Summer Total 6.0 

The Instructional I PRAXIS tests must be success- 
fully completed by the end of the first semester. 



Fall 


AE599* 


Professional Writing 






Intensive 


2.0 


AE606 


Research in Education 


3.0 


AE 547+ 


Program Design and Methods: 




Elementar)' 


3.0 


AE548+ 


Program Design and Methods: 




Middle and Secondary 


3.0 


AE 559+ 


Saturday Practicum 


3.0 


AE552 


The Art of Teaching 


3.0 




Unrestricted Electives 


3.0 


Fall Total 




18.0* 


Spring 


AE 659++ 


Student Teaching Practicun 
Art Education 


9.0 




Technology Elective 


3.0 




Unrestricted Electives 


3.0 


AE533+ 


Art and Inclusionary 






Education 


3.0 


Spring Tota: 




18.0 


Total Credit 




42.0 



Note: Courses to satisfy requirements for the MAT 
are offered at varying times, allowing graduate stu- 
dents 'programs to be customized to their needs. 
*AE 599 is required of all students who do not pass 
the Art Education Department Writing Proficiency 
Exam. It must be taken and passed in the first 
semester of enrollment, and it does not fulfill any 
credit reqinrements for the MAT program. (See 
course description for additional information. } 
Those who score below 70 percent on the 
Professional Writing Proficiency Exam after com- 
pleting the Professional Writing course may not 
continue in the MAT program. Students enrolled in 
AE 599 must either pay a per-credit charge for all 
credits exceeding the I8-credit alottment. or must 
delay two credits of electives to a future semester. 
** May be taken either the summer or fall semester 

-t-These courses have a required field placement, 
and may be taken in either the fall or spring 
semester 



+ + The Student Teaching Practicum consists of two 
4.5-credit components: seven-week elementary field 
placement and a seven-week secondary field place- 
ment. The two field placements may be taken over 
nio semesters. If this option is elected, the full 15- 
week seminar that accompanies the Practicum must 
be taken in both .semesters. 



70 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



Book Arts/ 
Printmaking 

Master of Fine Arts 

Patricia M.Smith 

psmith@uarts.eclu 

Director 

215-717-6490 

The MFA Program in Book Arts/ 
Printmaking focuses on the book as a con- 
ceptual departure for art making and 
personal expression. A two-year, 60-credit 
program built upon the University's long 
tradition of involvement with the book and 
the printed image, it is open to qualified stu- 
dents with an undergraduate degree in 
liberal arts, design, photography, print- 
B making, or fine art. 

Students explore the book as an art form 
that incorporates three-dimensional as well 
as two-dimensional structure, time and 
sequence, text and image. It embraces both 
the rich history of the book and the new 
processes and forms created by digital tech- 
nology. Its concept of book arts includes 
fine-press printing and illustrated texts, 
visual and verbal narratives, and works that 
push the idea of a book toward expressions 
as different as sculpture and mulfimedia. 

Important features of the program are its 
printmaking opportunities, its emphasis on 
investigating traditional and modem book- 
binding, and its encouragement of wrifing 
and the use of text. Its situation in an arts 
university gives the students a unique 
opportunity to draw on other art areas-pho- 
tography, graphic design, multimedia, 
crafts, and sculpture, among others. 

The course of study, which is individually 
tailored to each student's interests and expe- 
rience, encourages the development of new 
concepts, while offering proficiency in both 
traditional and contemporary processes. The 
core program of bookbinding, offset lithog- 
raphy, and letterpress courses is augmented 
by investigations into related fields of study 
in studio arts and coUoquia and seminars on 
art and the book. Courses in the first 
semester intersect, reflecting the integration 
of skills and concepts integral to book arts. 
Through both years, students are encour- 
aged to work on their writing. The second 
year concentrates on the MFA Thesis 
Exhibition under the supervision of an advi- 
sory committee. 



Students frequently choose to use their 
elective credits for internships in profes- 
sional laboratories and organizations and 
are welcome as interns in many prestigious 
conservation labs. 

The MFA Program invites internationally 
recognized visiting artists and critics to give 
workshops, exhibit, speak about their work, 
address issues of entry into the profession, 
and critique the work of students. 
Distinguished artists are also frequently 
invited to produce books or prints in the 
Borowsky Center for Publication Arts: stu- 
dents are welcome to observe or assist in the 
printing process. 

By the conclusion of the MFA program, 
the student will have developed the concep- 
tual and technical skills necessary to teach, 
print, design, publish, curate, work in the 
fields of book conservation, or open an 
independent studio or business. 

Specialized Facilities 

Students have individual workstations 
where light tables, storage space, book 
presses, and paper cutters are available. 
They enjoy full use of the University's well- 
equipped studios and specialized facilities, 
including studios for papermaking, non- 
silver photography, bookbinding, 
water-based screenprinting. letterpress, 
intaglio and relief printing, stone and paper 
lithography, and offset lithography. 
Stationary vertical and portable book 
presses, a board shear, tabletop shears, and a 
guillotine paper cutter are available for 
bookbinding. Letterpress facilities include 
four Vandercook proof presses, a pho- 
topolymer platemaking system, and over 
400 drawers of monotype, foundry, and 
wood type. Five etching presses and four 
lithography presses are available for 
printing. Besides an ATF-David.son offset 
press in the lithography pressroom, students 
have access to the Borowsky Center for 
Publication Arts, equipped with a 
Heidelberg KORS offset press and a full 
darkroom for experimental and production 
printing. An imaging lab houses a darkroom 
equipped with enlargers, horizontal and ver- 
tical copy-cameras, and a state-of-the-art 
filmsetting system integrated with the 
University's Macintosh computer labs. 
In the graduate Book Arts/Printmaking 
resource room, students can find book struc- 
ture models, books, journals, and 
newsletters relating to book arts and print- 
making, and professional materials on book 
artists, presses, and programs. 

Students also have access to many of the 
University's other extensive facilities. 



including state-of-the-art computers, gal- 
leries, and the Greenfield Library, whose 
visual art collection (books, periodicals, 
and slides) is one of the largest among the 
nation's visual art schools. Its special col- 
lection of artists' books provides a valuable 
teaching resource. 

Academic Requirements 

A cumulative GPA of 3.0 is required for 
good standing and for graduation for grad- 
uate students. A qualifying review at the 
conclusion of the first year's coursework is 
required to continue in the program. The 
final semester culminates in a MFA Thesis 
Exhibition. Please refer to CAD Graduate 
Programs for further information on grad- 
uate requirements. 

MFA in Bool< Arts/Printmaking 
Faculty 

James Green 

Master Lecturer 
BFA. Oberlin College 
MPh, Yale University 
MLS, Columbia University 

Lois M. Johnson 

Professor 

BSEd, University of North Dakota 

MFA, University of Wisconsin-Madison 

Peter Kruty 

Master Lecturer 

BA, University of Chicago 

MLS. MA, University of Alabama 

Hedi Kyle 

Adjunct Associate Professor 
Diploma. Werk-Kunstschule. Wiesbaden, 
Germany 

Carol Moore 

Associate Professor 
BFA, MFA, Tyler School of Art, 
Temple University 

Mary Phelan 

Associate Professor 

BS. College of Saint Rose 

MA. University of Wisconsin-Madison 

Winifred Radolan 

Senior Lecturer 

BS, Moore College of Art 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



71 



Patricia M. Smith 

Assistant Professor 
BA, Immaculata College 
MA, Philadelphia College of Art 
Yoshida Hanga Academy, Tokyo 

Lori Spencer 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 

BFA, State University of New York, 

Purchase 
MFA, The University of the Arts 

Lynne Sures 

Master Lecturer 

BA, University of Maryland 

MFA. University of Maryland 

Susan T. Viguers 

Professor 

BA, Bryn Mawr College 

MA, University of North Carolina at 

Chapel Hill 
PhD, Bryn Mawr College 

Susan White 

Lecturer 

BFA, Moore College of Art 

MFA, The University of the Arts 



Book Arts/Printmaking 

Master of Fine Arts 60 credits 



Year One 




Credits 


Fall 






PR 600 A 


Colloquium A: 






Text and Image 


1.5 


PR6I0A 


Book Arts Studio; 






Color Mark 


3.0 


PR 612 A* 


Book Arts Studio 


4.5 


PR 623 A 


Bookbinding 


1.5. 


PR 626* 


Offset Lithography 


1.5 




Free Electives 


3.0 


Fall Total 




15.0 


Spring 






PR 600 B 


Colloquium B: 






History of the Book 


1.5 


PR 610 B 


Book Arts Studio; 






Color Mark 


3.0 


PR 612 B* 


Book Arts Studio 


3.0 


PR 623 B 


Bookbinding 


1.5 


GR692 


University Seminar: 






Art and Design in Society 3.0 




Free Electives 


3.0 


Spring Iota 




15.0 


First Year Total 


30.0 


Year Two 




Credits 


Fall 






PR 700 A 


Colloquium: 






Professional Practices 


1.5 


PR 7 10 A 


MFA Thesis Studio 


3.0 


PR 711 A 


MFA Thesis Studio: 






Thesis Exhibition 


3.0 


PR 723 A 


Bookbinding 


1.5 .• 


GR691 


University Seminar: 






Structure and Metaphor 


3.0 




Free Electives 


3.0 


Fall Total: 




15.0 


Spring 






PR 700 B 


Colloquium: 






Professional Practices 


1.5 


PR 710 B 


MFA Thesis Studio 


3.0 


PR711B 


MFA Thesis Studio: 






Thesis Exhibition 


3.0 


PR 723 B 


Bookbinding 


1.5 


GR791 


University 






Seminar; Criticism 


3.0 




Free Electives 


3.0 


Spring Total 




15.0 


Second Year Total 


30.0 


Total Credit 




60.0 



* These courses may be taken for variable credit. 
72 The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



Ceramics, 
Painting, or 
Sculpture 

Master of Fine Arts 

Low Residency Program 

Carol Moore 

cmoore@uarts.edu 
Director 
215-717-6106 ■ 

These studio-based Master of Fine Arts 
degree programs are intended to broaden 
and advance the conceptual, critical, histor- 
ical, and practical knowledge needed to 
sustain a contemporary studio. The pro- 
grams have been designed to meet the needs 
of artists holding BFA or BA degrees who 
are interested in pursuing an MFA in either 
Ceramics, Painting, or Sculpture within a 
time frame that accommodates their 
employment or academic year schedule. 

Departing from the traditional semester 
format, students enter this three-year pro- 
gram in summer and complete the major 
portion of their work during three annual 
eight-week summer residencies of intensive, 
individually focused studio experience. In 
addition to exploration in the major, stu- 
dents pursue interdisciplinary investigations 
in studio topics common to each discipline 
and address contemporary critical issues 
and methodology in University graduate 
seminars. 

During the fall and spring semesters, stu- 
dents complete independent studios, writing 
and research projects, and independent 
thesis preparations. Regional students main- 
tain contact with studio faculty and present 
studio work at specific intervals throughout 
the off-campus semester and at final cri- 
tiques held at the end of the fall and spring 
semesters. Non-regional students meet with 
assigned studio mentors in their geographic 
region for concurrent periodic and final cri- 
tiques of in-progress and completed work. 
Off-campus writing and research projects 
are completed via mail or e-mail communi- 
cation with seminar faculty. A final thesis 
review and exhibition is held following 
completion of the third summer 



Studios and Facilities 

During residence at the University, 
summer MFA students enjoy access to well- 
equipped studios and facilities that support 
work undertaken in each discipline. These 
include: dedicated painting studios, three 
major gas kilns with 90. 40. and 30 cubic 
foot capacity, numerous electric kilns, wood 
and metal shops, carving studios, a forge, 
and foundry. Students are expected to locate 
off-campus studio space for work under- 
taken during the fall and spring independent 
studio semesters. In addition, students have 
access to the University's extensive facilities 
that include the Greenfield Library, whose 
visual arts collection ranks among the 
largest of the nation's visual art schools; 
state-of-the-art academic computing labora- 
tories; numerous galleries and performance 
spaces; and the more than 100 museums and 
cultural institutions that comprise the 
extended campus of the city of Philadelphia. 
The cultural resources of New York and 
Washington, D.C., are only hours away. 

Students will be challenged by the broadly 
diverse aesthetic and critical opinions of dis- 
tinguished studio faculty and noted visiting 
artists and critics who are in\'ited to partici- 
pate in the program each summer. 

Recent visiting artists and critics have 
included; Siah Annajani, Bany Bartlett, Jose 
Bedia, Paul Bloodgood, Tom Butter, William 
Daley, Arthur Danto, Heidi Fasnacht, Sharon 
Horvath, Komar and Melamid. Janet Koplos. 
Sean Landers. Winifred Lutz. Dominique 
Nahas, Thomas Nozkowski, Lisa Orr, Sheila 
Pepe, Howardena Pindell, Elaine Reichek, 
Kathy Rose, Sandy Skoglund, Robert Storr, 
Stephen Tanis, George Trakas, Ursula Von 
Rydingsvard, and Leslie Wayne. 

Summer MFA candidates are expected to 
follow the curriculum as structured in order 
to complete the program within three years 
and present a final thesis exhibition fol- 
lowing the completion of the third summer 

Vermont Studio Center 
Graduate Study Exchange 

The University of the Arts has a special 
relationship with the Vermont Studio Center 
in Johnson, Vermont. Summer Master of 
Fine Arts candidates who have completed 
the first year in the SUMFA program may 
apply to attend VSC during the off-campus 
fall and spring semesters by contacting the 
Director of the Summer MFA Programs. 

Scholarships received during the summer 
session are not transferable for tuition pay- 
ment during the off-campus fall and spring 
semesters. 



MFA in Ceramics, Painting, 
or Sculpture Faculty 

Tom Csaszar 

Senior Lecturer 

BFA, University of Pennsylvania 

A. P. Gorny 

Adjunct Associate Professor 

BFA, The State University of New York 

at Buffalo 
Institute dell'Arte, Siena, Italy 
MFA. Yale University School of Art 

Jeanne laffe 

Professor 

BFA. Tyler School of Art. 

Temple University 
MFA, New York State College of 

Ceramics at Alfred University 

Mark Lueders 

Lecturer 

BFA, Miami University 

MFA, University of Pennsylvania 

Carol Moore 

Associate Professor 
BFA, MFA, Tyler School of Art, 
Temple University 

Eileen Neff 

Adjunct Professor 
BA. Temple University 
BFA. Philadelphia College of Art 
MFA. Tyler School of Art. 
Temple University 

Gerald Nichols 

Professor 

Diploma. Cleveland Institute of Art 

MFA. University of Pennsylvania 

Robin Rice 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 
BFA. Ohio Wesleyan University 
MA. University of Missouri 

Jennie Shanker 

Lecturer 

BFA. MAT, The University of the Arts 

MFA. Yale University 



The University of tlie Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



73 



Ceramics, Painting, 
or Sculpture 

Master of Fine Arts 60 credits 



Year One 



Credits 



Summer I 

XX 610 Major Studio in Ceramics, 

Painting, or Sculpture 6 .0 

FA 611 Graduate Drawing 3.0 

Choose one of the following nw: 

GR691 University Seminar: 

Structure and Metaphor 3.0 

OR 692 University Seminar: 

Art and Design in Society 3.0 

Summer Total: 12.0 

Fall I 

Independent Studio 1 in Ceramics, 



FA 69 1 



FA 695 

Fall Total: 
Spring I 

FA 692 

FA 696 
Spring Total: 



Painting, or Sculpture 
Independent Writing 
Project I 



3.0 



1.5 
4.5 



Independent Studio II in Ceramics, 
Painting, or Sculpture 3.0 

Independent Writing 
Project II 1.5 

4.5 



First Year Total 



21.0 



Year Two Credits 


Year Three 


Credits 


Summer II 




Summer 


III 






XX 6 1 1 Major Studio in Ceramics, 




XX710 


Major Studio in Ceramics, 




Painting, or Sculpmre 


6.0 




Painting, or Sculpture 




6.0 


Elective* 


3.0 


FA 612 


Professional Practices 




3.0 


Choose one of the following t^vo: 




GR791 


University Seminar: 






GR 69 1 Structure and Metaphor or 


3.0 




Criticism 




3.0 


GR 692 University Seminar: 




Summer Total: 




12.0 


Art and Design in Society 
Summer Total: 


3.0 
12.0 


Fall III 

FA 795 


Thesis Exhibition 




6.0 


Fall II 

FA 781 Thesis Writing Project 1 in 
Painting, or Sculpture 


Ceramics, 

1.5 
3.0 
4.5 


Fall Total: 






6.0 


Third Year Total 




18.0 


FA 793 Thesis Preparation I 
Fall Total: 


Total Credits 




60.0 



Spring II 

FA 782 

FA 794 
Spring Total 



Thesis Writing Project II in Ceramics, 
Painting, or Sculpture 1.5 

Thesis Preparation II 3.0 

4.5 



Second Year Total 



21.0 



■■■Recommended Electives: 

FA 610 Studio Topic 

AE 602 History of Ideas in 

Art and Museum Education 

HU 448 A American Art Since 1945 

HU 448 B European Art Since 1945 

HU456 Major Artists ' - 



Note: Prefixes (XX) for the major studio courses 
reflect the student's area of concentration: 
Ceramics (CR), Painting (PT), or Sculpture (SC). 



74 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



Industrial Design 

Master of Industrial 
Design 

JamerHunt 

jhunt@uarts.edu 

Director 

215-717-6253 

The Master's Program in Industrial 
Design is a graduate laboratory for postin- 
dustrial design. Students and faculty are 
actively exploring how to design for new 
social conditions in which behavioral, mate- 
rial, technological, and natural landscapes 
are shifting. We are committed to devel- 
oping new models of design practice that 
are multidisciplinary, collaborative, and 
team-based. We stress process, with an 
emphasis on research, conceptualization, 
communication, and appropriate form- 
giving. 

The program itself is a two-year, 60- 
credit curriculum consisting of studio, 
methods, and seminar courses. The cur- 
riculum is project-based, which means that 
each semester, course content is integrated 
around studio-based projects. Projects range 
from the development of new urban indus- 
tries to incubating independent publishing 
labels for hard and soft design. By pro- 
viding research proposals, future studies, 
and case studies, we are promoting a new, 
more proactive role for design education. 

Because design is a collaborative profes- 
sion, most studio projects will be 
team-based. During the first and third 
semesters of study, first-year students will 
work with second-year students in a shared 
studio. Semester two is more individually 
oriented. The final semester of the two-year 
program is devoted to a master's thesis in 
which the candidate will work more inde- 
pendently with a group of internal faculty 
and/or outside professionals to develop a 
thesis project that must advance the candi- 
date's chosen field of study. 

Like the program itself, the faculty repre- 
sent a wide range of approaches to the 
practice of design. This means that students 
have access to currently practicing design 
professionals with backgrounds in fields 
ranging from architecture, graphic design, 
cultural anthropology, and psychology to 
industrial, systems and environmental 
design. The Industrial Design Department 
thus offers a unique core faculty group who 
share a common philosophy and commit- 
ment to the design process. 



We are an interdisciplinary program, so 
we welcome applicants from diverse fields 
such as the fine arts, architecmre, sociology, 
law, business, engineering, and information 
technologies. What unites the students is 
their enthusiasm for design and material 
culture, as well as an interest in the social 
impact of design on our society. All candi- 
dates must hold a bachelor's degree (or 
equivalent). In addition, in order to be 
accepted at the graduate level, all qualified 
applicants must demonstrate some form of 
professional involvement in a design-related 
field. Each candidate is then carefully 
selected to assure a comprehensive balance 
of disciplines in the program. 

Specialized Facilities 

In the graduate design studio, each stu- 
dent is provided with an Apple computer for 
his/her desktop, access to the University 
network, and a powerful suite of software; 
there are Windows NT machines, as well, 
for advanced 3-D modeling. The department 
also provides access to digital cameras and 
projectors for process documentation and 
presentation. 



Master of Industrial Design 
Faculty 

David Comberg 

Adjunct Associate Professor 

BFA, Massachusetts College of Art 

MFA.Yale School of Art 

Anthony Guido 

Associate Professor 

BSID, The Ohio State University 

JamerHunt 

Director MID. Associate Professor 
BA, Brown University 
PhD in Cultural Anthropology, 
Rice University 

Jonas Milder 

Assistant Professor 

BID. Fachhochschule fur Gestaltung, 

Germany 
MID, Hochschule der Kiinste, Germany 

Slavko Milekic 

Associate Professor 

MD. Belgrade University, Yugoslavia 

MSc, PhD, University of Connecticut 

Barent Roth 

Senior Lecturer 

BSID, University of Illinois 

MID, The University of the Arts 

MarekWalczak 

Adjunct Professor 

RIBA 1 and II, Architecture Association, 
London 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



75 



Industrial Design 

Master of Industrial Design 



Year One 


Credits 


Fall 






ID 600 


ID Seminar: 






Concepts and Contexts 


3.0 


ID 601 


Graduate Design Studio 


6.0 


ID 620 


Advanced Design Methods 


3.0 


GR691 


University Seminar: 






Structure and Metaphor 


3.0 


Fall Total 




15.0 


Spring 






1D710 


Advanced Project Tutorial 1 


6.0 


ID 627 


Human Factors: Interactivity 


3.0 


GR692 


University Seminar: 





Spring Total 



Art and Design in Society 3.0 

Elective 3.0 

15.0 



First Year Total 


30.0 


Year Two 


Fall 






ID 700 


ID Seminar: 






Professional Development 


3.0 


ID 602 


Advanced Design Studio 


6.0 


ID 625 


Advanced 






Computer Applications 


3,0 




Elective 


3.0 


Fall Total 




15.0 


Spring 






ID 711 


Advanced Project Tutorial II 6.0 


ID 749 


Master's Thesis 






Documentation 


6.0 




Elective 


3.0 


Spring Total 




15.0 


Second Year Total 


30^0 


Total Credit 




60,0 



In addition to required courses, students take elec- 
tive courses that enable them to pursue their spe- 
cific interest, as well as overcome deficiencies in 
their design preparation. In certain cases, particu- 
larly for applicants fivm non-design undergraduate 
programs, it is necessary to complete specific 
courses in industrial design. These courses are 
selected from appropriate undergraduate courses 
and may not apply towards degree requirements. 



76 



The University of ttie Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



Museum Studies 



Polly McKenna-Cress 

pmckennacress@uarts.edu 

Chairperson 

215-717-6328 

The Museum Studies Department pro- 
vides students with the skills and 
knowledge necessary to promote and 
enhance the relationship between museums 
and the public. In all three graduate 
museum programs, students take core 
courses addressing the character of 
museums, the nature of museum audiences, 
current museum practice, and the theory 
underlying museum practice. 

Lecture courses, seminars, and studio 
courses allow students to understand the 
demands of museum practice, to understand 
past and current issues in the profession, to 
address the future needs of museums, to 
meet and talk with professionals in the field, 
and to acquire hands-on skills in the many 
areas of museum practice. 

Students specialize in the areas of 
museum exhibition or museum education, 
or pursue a more general course of study 
focusing on the interface between the 
museum and the public. Most museum 
studies courses are open to all museum 
studies majors, and some are open to stu- 
dents from other departments who are 
interested in museum practice and profes- 
sions. A wide range of concepts, 
experiences, and approaches are encoun- 
tered, including hands-on visitor studies 
and on-site internships and practicums; 
computer skills are developed for use in 
design, publication, museum record- 
keeping, interactive museum media, and 
museum outreach via the Web. 

Museum Studies graduates find career 
opportuniUes as museum educators, cre- 
ators of museum exhibitions, museum 
digital media specialists, program special- 
ists, and in the ranks of museum 
administration dealing with the public: 
directorships, collections management and 
display, public relations, development, and 
related activifies in museums, historic sites, 
zoos, aquariums, botanic gardens, and spe- 
cialist consultancies. 



Museum Studies Faculty 

Ed Bedno 

Adjunct Professor 
BFA, Art Institute of Chicago 
MS/GD, Institute of Design. 
Illinois Institute of Technology 

jane Bedno 

Professor 

BA. Roosevelt University 

JD. College of William and Mary 

Gerard Brown 

Lecliirt'r 

BFA. Boston University School of 

Fine Arts 
MFA, School of the Art Institute 

of Chicago 

Allegra Burnette 

Senior Lecturer 

BA, Dartmouth College 

MFA, The University of the Arts 

Eddie Chernoff 

Master Lecturer 

BA, Rutgers University 

MEd, Temple University 

Susan Clarke-Plumb 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 
BA, Mary Washington College, 

The University of Virginia 
MED, Pennsylvania State University 
MED, Harvard University 
PhD, Pennsylvania State University 

Tom Csaszar 

Senior Lecturer 

BFA, University of Pennsylvania 

Alice A. Dommert 

Senior Lecturer 

BS, Architecture, Louisiana State 

University 
MFA, The University of the Arts 

Barry Dornfeld 

Associate Professor 

BA. Tufts University 

MA, PhD, University of Pennsylvania 

Anne El-Omami 

Associate Professor 

BFA, BA, University of Nebraska, 

Lincoln 
MA, University of Nebraska 



Aaron Goldblatt 

Senior Lecturer 

BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 
MFA, Tyler School of Art, 
Temple University 

jamerHunt 

Assistain Professor 
BA, Brown University 
PhD, Rice University 

Polly McKenna-Cress 

Associate Professor 

BFA, Rhode Island School of Design 

MFA, The University of the Arts 

Janet Kamien 

Senior Lecturer 

BFA, Boston University 

MED, MFA. Lesley University 

Wm. Frank Mitchell 

Assistant Professor 
AB, Bowdoin College 
MA, Yale University 
MA, University of Michigan 
PhD, University of Michigan 

Carol Moore 

Associate Professor 
BFA, MFA, Tyler School of Art, 
Temple University 

Danielle Rice 

Master Lecturer 

BA, Wellesley College 

MPh, PhD, Yale University 

Portia Hamilton Sperr 

Adjunct Associate Professor 
Diploma in Pedagogy, Assoc. 

Montessori International 
BA, Barnard College 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



77 



Museum Communication 

Master of Arts 
Polly McKenna-Cress 

pmckennacress@uarts.edu 

Chairperson 

215-717-6328 

The MA in Museum Communication is a 
course of study in the contemporary theory 
and practice of museum work. Museum pro- 
fessionals seeking a graduate degree in 
museum studies for professional advance- 
ment, and museum volunteers who seek 
professional credentials to make the transi- 
tion into professional museum work can 
acquire the skills, knowledge, and practical 
training in dealing with the public sector, 
with responsibilities that include museum 
publications, public relations, membership, 
development, record-keeping, outreach activ- 
ities including Internet presence, and visitor 
services. 

Organized within the traditional academic 
semester framework, with some short, inten- 
sive one- and two-week-long sessions during 
the winter and summer academic breaks, and 
annual international museum issues semi- 
nars, the Department of Museum Studies 
prepares those who seek careers as collec- 
tions managers, exhibition developers, 
educators, and media and public affairs spe- 
cialists. International museum professionals 
may further their careers through the acqui- 
sition of academic credentials and through a 
broader perspective and knowledge of cur- 
rent museum practices acquired in courses, 
seminars, special museum placements, 
internships, and a thesis. Course content and 
design, which bridge the academic and the 
professional, recognize the growing need for 
specialized museum training and preferences 
in a competitive job market for those with 
both graduate degrees and museum studies 
training. Graduates work in museums of 
anthropology, archaeology, fine art, history, 
natural history, science centers, zoos, arbore- 
tums, and national parks. Others find 
employment in government agencies, histor- 
ical societies, historic sites and houses, and 
with private and coiporate collections and 
foundations. 

Full-time MA students undertake a three- 
semester academic course of study, and a 
12-week (240-hour) internship placement. 
Those students studying for the MA in 
Museum Communication conclude their 
degree program through the submission 
of a written thesis, thesis defense, and 
examination. 

During each 15-week semester, students 



participate in lectures, seminars, workshops, 
and study visits to appropriate museums, 
historic sites, galleries, and government cul- 
tural agencies. All courses in the department 
welcome visiUng scholars and museum pro- 
fessionals to give lectures and hold 
discussion groups on aspects of museum 
practice. 

The department of Electronic Media, the 
Master of Industrial Design program, and 
the College of Media and Communication 
contribute to the graduate student's educa- 
tion through inter-departmental coursework, 
workshops, seminars, and interdisciplinary 
special projects. 

Applicants to the Master of Arts in 
Museum Communication should possess a 
BFA, BA, or BS degree, demonstrated work 
experience in the museum field or in related 
institutions/consultancies, or discipline- 
based training, and the intention of utilizing 
this specialized training in a museum con- 
text, and basic word processing and Internet 
research skills. 



Museum 
Communication 

Master of Arts 45 credits 



Year One 


Credits 


Fall 






MS 501 


Museum Seminar: 






The Museum 


3.0 


MS 508 


The Museum Audience 


3.0 


MS 600 


Muscology 


3.0 


GR691 


University Seminar: 






Structure and Metaphor 


3.0 




Elective* 


3.0 


Fall Total 




15.0 


Spring 


' 




MS 601 


Issues in Museums Seminai 


3.0 


MS 740 


Thesis Research 


3.0 


MS 749 A 


Thesis Development 


1.5 




Elective* 


3.0 




Elective* 


3.0 


GR692 


University Seminar: 






Art and Design in Society 


3.0 


Spring Tola 




16.5 


First Year Total 


33.0 


Year Two 


Summer 






MS 759 


Museum Internship 


3.0 


Summer Total 


3.0 


Fall 






MS 602 


Museum Governance: Legal Issues, 




Ethics in Museums 


3.0 


MS 749 B 


Thesis Development 


1.5 




Elective* 


3.0 




Elective* 


3.0 


Fall Total 




10.5 


Second Year Total 


13.5 


Total Credits 


45.0 



* Nine credit hours ofelectives must be in Museum 
Studies. 



78 



Tlie University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



Museum Education 

Master of Arts 
Anne El-Omami 

aelomami@uarts.edu 

Director 

215-717-6051 or 717-6050 

The Master of Arts in Museum Education 
is a concentrated program focused on the 
development and implementation of appro- 
priate pedagogical practices and 
critical/interpretive skills for communi- 
cating to the public about culture and the 
arts. Coursework comprises three distinct 
areas: a broad education core addressing 
theory and methods, a concentration in 
museum studies and practices, and a profes- 
sional core including research and an 
internship with a cooperating museum. 

Applicants should have had a core of at 
least 40 credits in the arts, liberal arts, 
and/or communications, with a minimum of 
18 credits in art history (or 12 credits in art 
history and six credits in anthropology or 
communications). This degree is an appro- 
priate option for those with a strong 
commitment to providing educational pro- 
gramming within a museum context or 
alternative site, as well as for teachers who 
wish a concentration in museum education 
so they may utilize museum resources more 
effectively in the classroom. 

Museums and galleries worldwide are 
becoming more dependent upon their audi- 
ences for support. The role of museums is 
changing to meet audience demands, 
including expectations for more relevant 
and accessible public educational program- 
ming to promote cultural knowledge and 
interests. This growing trend has created a 
greater demand for well-trained profes- 
sionals with special knowledge and 
expertise in planning and implementing 
museum programs. Additionally, current 
educational theory and methodology 
embrace the inclusion of art history, criti- 
cism, and aesthetics as critical components 
of the arts education curriculum, all areas 
heavily dependent upon museums for exem- 
plary resources and reference. The MA in 
Museum Education focuses on a wide 
variety of museums and institutions with 
similar missions and operations, and pre- 
pares educators to function within the 
changing context of contemporary schools, 
museums, and related institutions. The MA 
in Museum Education may be completed in 
two semesters and a summer or in three 
semesters. 

The Museum Studies core may be taken 



separately or in conjunction with another 
master's program at The University of the 
Arts. The core includes courses from the 
museum studies core and may also include 
the Graduate Museum Project and 
Internship with special approval. This series 
of courses may be combined with the 
Master of Arts in Teaching in the Visual 
Arts, the Master of Arts in Art Education, or 
the MFA in Museum Exhibition Planning 
and Design. 



Museum Education 

Master of Arts 36 ere 



Year One 


Credits 


Fall 






AE606 


Research in Education: 






Methods and Trends 


3.0 


GR69I 


University Seminar: 






Structure and Metaphor 


3.0 


AE 550 


Creative and Cognitive 






Development 


3.0 


MS 510 


Museum Education 






Practicum 


3.0 


MS 508 


The Museum Audience 


3.0 


MS 658 


Museum Education 






Internship 


3.0 


FallTotal 




18.0 


Spring 






MS 622 


Media for Museum 






Communication 


3.0 


MS 615 


Educational Programming 
for Museums and 






Alternative Sites 


3.0 


MS 648 


Graduate Museum Project 


3.0 


MS 658 


Museum Education 






Internship 


3.0 


Choose one of the following nw: 




MS 501 


Museum Seminar: 






The Museum 


3.0 


MS 600 


Museology 


3.0 


GR692 


University Seminar: 






Art and Design in Society 


3.0 


Spring Tota 




18.0 


Total Credit 




36.0 



Additional elective courses are encouraged in 
interactive media, multicultural learning arts, 
design for interdisciplinary learning, history of 
ideas in art and museum education, and media for 
museum communication. 



TTie University of tlie Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



79 



Museum Exhibition 
Planning and Design 

Master of Fine Arts 
Polly McKenna-Cress 

pmckennacress @ uarts.edu 

Director 

215-717-6328 

Recognized formally by the American 
Association of Museums since 1981, the field 
of exhibition planning and design has 
become a demanding, fast-growing profes- 
sion as museums respond to the demand for 
exhibitions addressed to public needs and 
interests. With the cooperation of a group of 
major regional museums, following the 
guidelines established by N.A.M.E. (National 
Association for Museum Exhibition), The 
University of the Arts offers a two-year, 60- 
credit Master of Fine Arts degree that 
prepares students for professional careers in 
the development and design of exhibits for 
museums and other interpretive centers, 
focusing on methods of presentation for col- 
lections, while exploring the full range of 
exhibition communication and methodology. 

Representatives of cooperating museums 
and the University faculty offer a curriculum 
that addresses the conceptualization, 
research, organization, design, and produc- 
tion of museum exhibits and educational 
presentations, utilizing a variety of tech- 
niques and media. It also explores exhibii 
programming, evaluation, and management 
methods applicable in a wide range of 
museum situations. Visiting experts teach 
many aspects of museum presentation, edu- 
cation, and management, and students make 
formal visits to design departments, produc- 
tion shops, galleries, exhibits, and programs 
in numerous museums, service providers, and 
consultancies in Philadelphia, the Mid- 
Atlantic Region. Washington, D.C., and New 
York. 

Students undertake a thesis project and a 
supervised museum internship related to their 
career interests during the second year of the 
program. To preserve the intimate contact 
with museum professionals and to guarantee 
participants studio facilities, the program is 
limited to nine entrants per year 

Most candidates for this program will have 
previously completed a baccalaureate degree 
in industrial, graphic, interior, or architectural 
design, and demonstrate an acceptable level 
of professional accomplishment through a 
portfolio or another appropriate means. 
Alternatively, they may seek admission with 
a baccalaureate in a discipline related to a 
particular career direction, and take courses 



to develop the necessary background in 
design. Students from non-design, non-art 
backgrounds are also encouraged to apply. 

The first year provides a basic under- 
standing of the exhibition process, with the 
first semester focused on conceptual develop- 
ment, planning, systems, and intellectual 
analysis of problems, and the second on the 
practical implementation of concepts and on 
understanding materials and methods of exhi- 
bition design and production. The second 
year is dedicated to practice of skills learned 
during the first year, and practical exposure 
to actual exhibition development practice in 
museums and museum consultancies. 
Activities during the final semester are 
focused primarily on thesis development and 
completion. 



Museum Exhibition 
Planning and Design 

Master of Fine Arts 60 credits 



Specialized Facilities 

The graduate studios in Museum 
Exhibition Planning and Design feature 
direct student access to a Computer-Aided 
Design Center. The Computer-Aided Design 
Facility and the Academic Computing labora- 
tories are completely equipped computer 
centers dedicated to drafting, rendering, 
desktop publishing, computer-aided graphic 
design, multimedia, and illustration. Students 
get installation experience through the 
University galleries and regional institutions. 



Year One 




Credits 


Year Two 




Credits 


Fall 






Summer 






MS 501 


Museum Seminar: 




MS 759 


Museum Internship* 


3.0 




The Museum 


3,0 


Summer Total 


3.0 


MS610A 


Museum Exhibition 




Fall 




. 




Design Studio 


6.0 










MS 710 


Museum Exhibition 




MS 620 A 


Museum Graphics 


1.5 




Design Studio 


6.0 


MS 623 A 


Exhibition Materials 












MS 508 


The Museum Audience 


3.0 




and Methods 


1.5 










Elective 


3.0 


MS 749 A 
OR 691 


Thesis Development 
University Semijiar; 


3.0 


Fall Total 




15.0 




Structure and Metaphor 


3.0 


Spring 






Fall Total 




15.0 


MS 502 


Museum Seminar; 
The Exhibition 


3.0 


Spring 

MS 622 


Media for Museum 




MS 610 B 


Museum Exhibition 






Communication 


3.0 




Design Studio 


6.0 


MS 749 B 


Thesis Development 


3.0 


MS 620 B 


Museum Lighting 
and Color 


1.5 


OR 791 


University Seminar; 
Criticism 


3.0 


MS 623 B 


Exhibition Materials 
and Methods 


1.5 




Elective 


3.0 


GR692 


University Seminar; 




Spring Tota 




12.0 




Art and Design in Soc 


ety 3.0 


Second Year Total 


30.0 


Spring Iota 




15.0 


— Total Credis 




60.0 


First Year Tc 


tal 


30.0 

















* Students with at least six months of direct exhibition 
related experience in a museum, equivalent institution 
or a museum consultancy may substitute one three- 
hour elective for the internship requirement. 



8o 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



Graduate Seminars 

The graduate seminar serves as a lively, 
interdisciplinary forum that brings together 
students engaged in discreet graduate pro- 
grams to examine relationships between 
contemporary visual culture and historic 
ideas about art and design. Recognizing 
Philadelphia as a setting and laboratory for 
the development of collaborative projects and 
career initiatives, students in the seminar can 
discuss and apply ideas being explored in 
their own fields of study in order to identify 
and cultivate connections between and 
beyond their respective areas of study. 

In practice, graduate seminar study empha- 
sizes the development of writing, research, 
and critical skills to aid students in the com- 
munication and documentation of their work 
and ideas — both in the major, as it pertains 
to their specific explorations, and in the 
wider contemporary context of art and design 
issues. The seminar experience offers stu- 
dents the opportunity to develop presentation 
skills by maximizing the use of multimedia 
applications for presentations of their 
research results. 

Each graduate program in The College 
of Art and Design offers a selection of semi- 
nars designed to inform the direction of the 
major curriculum. Seminar course listings. 
Structure and Metaphor. Art and Society, and 
Criticism are described in the course descrip- 
tions, and are listed as part of each graduate 
program's curriculum. 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 8l 




Undergraduate and Graduate 
Course Catalog 
2003 • 2004 



i 



The University 
OF THE Arts® 



College of Performing Arts Major Areas of study 



Richard J. Lawn, Dean 

riawn@uarts.edu 
215-717-6126 
Marianne Mele, Assistant to the Dean 

mmele@uarts.edu 
215-717-6127 

The College of Performing Arts (CPA) is comprised of the Schools 
of Dance. Music, and Theater Arts. Its curricula combine the per- 
formance emphasis of the traditional conservatory, stressing 
individualized training, practice, and discipline, with a liberal arts 
education. 

Founded in 1870 as the Philadelphia Musical Academy, and 
merged with the Philadelphia Conservatory of Music in 1962, the 
College has long been regarded as one of America's foremost profes- 
sional schools of higher education. Many of its eariy graduates and 
faculty were members and founders of the Philadelphia Orchestra 
when it was formed in 1900. 

In 1976, the institution was renamed the Philadelphia College of 
the Performing Arts, thereby signaling its intention to expand its pro- 
gram to include all three of the pertbrming arts disciplines-Music, 
Dance, and Theater. In 1977, The Philadelphia Dance Academy 
joined the College to become the School of Dance. Founded in 1947, 
The Philadelphia Dance Academy was one of the foremost conserva- 
tories of dance in the nation and one of the first three insfitutions in 
the country to grant a degree in dance. The School of Theater was ini- 
tiated in 1983.^ 

The College of Performing Arts thus became Pennsylvania's first 
and only independent college dedicated exclusively to the performing 
arts, and one of the first of its kind in the United States. Its philos- 
ophy is founded on the principle that there is a common bond among 
artists, whatever their discipline, and that artists must interact with 
each other for their inspiration and growth. Indeed, many of the 
College's students have developed interdisciplinary careers that 
require familiarity with all the performing arts, as well as the visual 
and media arts. 



All students are assigned to a faculty advisor. Lists are posted in 
each of the schools' offices during the first week of the academic 
year Appointments are made at the mutual convenience of the stu- 
dent and the faculty advisor 

Students should feel free to see their advisor at any time con- 
cerning problems they may encounter 

School of Dance 

Undergraduate Programs 

Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) in Dance 

Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) in Dance Education 

Certificate in Dance (two-year program) 
Dance Majors 

Ballet 

Jazz/Theater Dance 

Modern Dance 

Dance Education 

School of Music 

Undergraduate Programs 

Bachelor of Music (BM in Jazz Studies) in Composifion ■ 

Bachelor of Music (BM in Jazz Studies) in Instrumental 
Performance 

Bachelor of Music (BM in Jazz Studies) in Vocal Performance 

Diploma in Jazz Studies 

Certificate in Jazz Studies (two-year program) 
Graduate Programs 

Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Music Education 

Master of Music (MM), Jazz Studies 
Areas of Concentration 

Flute 

Clarinet " ■' 

Saxophone . 

Woodwinds ' ' 

Trumpet .■ 

Trombone ' - 

Tuba , ■ . ~ 

Guitar ' ' ■ 

Electric and/or Upright Bass 

Violin ~ . 

Cello 

Percussion 

Drums 

Piano • 

Voice 

Composition 

School of Theater Arts 

Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) in Theater Arts 
Majors 
Acting 

Applied Theater Arts 
Musical Theater 

Credit-Hour Ratio 

Please refer to the course descriptions for specific information. 



8H 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



CPA Minors 

The College of Performing Arts offers minors that enable a stu- 
dent to focus on a specific discipline through organized electives. 

Students wishing to include a minor are governed by the fol- 
lowing guidelines: 

1. Students must meet eligibility requirements, which may 
include a satisfactory grade point average, prerequisites, and depart- 
mental portfolio review. 

2. Intent to complete a minor is declared by filing the completed 
Minor Declaration Form with the Office of the Registrar. The forms 
are available in the Office of the Registrar. 

3. A student may not major and minor in the same program, 
except where indicated. 

4. Courses applied to the minor may not also be applied towards 
the major program requirements. 

5. All minors require a minimum of 15 credits, with the exception 
of E-Music for Music majors. Generally, no substitutions to the 
minor requirements are allowed. In exceptional situations where 
substitutions are granted, they must have the approval of both the 
major and minor program advisors. 

6. The minor advisor must approve all courses taken as part of a 
minor. 

7. A student pursuing a minor may be required to complete more 
than the minimum number of credits required to complete the under- 
graduate degree in order to also complete the minor. 

E-Music Minor, Multimedia/Music Department 

The minor in E-Music offers students majoring in both 
Multimedia and Music an opportunity to create electronic and 
experimental music, to develop skills that allow them to produce, 
package and distribute music by taking advantage of digital tech- 
nology, and to design electronic instrumental interfaces. The minor 
prepares students for a variety of highly entrepreneurial careers 
ranging from entertainment and product development to creative and 
production work in the recording and musical fields. This minor is 
only available to students majoring in Multimedia or Music. Please 
note that this minor reqiures 17 credits for Music majors. 



MU306 History of Rock & 




Experimental Music 


3.0 credits 


MU413A Recording 


2.0 


MM 370 E-Music Thesis Project 


3.0 


For Multimedia Majors 




MU 1 1 1 A/B Composition/Non-Majors 


2.0 


MM 440 Innovative Interfaces 


3.0 


MU 130 A/B Piano for Non-Majors ( 1/1 ) 


2.0 


For Music Majors 




MM 110 Visual Concepts I 


3,0 


MM 121 Introduction to 




Interface Design 


3.0 


One of the following: 




MM 22 1 Interactive Studio I 


3.0 


MM 222 Interactive Studio II 


3.0 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 85 



CPA Full- 
Faculty 



and Part-Time 



School of Dance 

Kim Bears-Bailey 

Assistam Professor 

BFA. The University of the Arts 

Ninotchl<a Bennahum 

BA, Swarthmore College 
PhD. New York University 

Peter Bertini 

Associate Professor 

BS. State University of New York, 

Brockport 
MFA, Philadelphia College of 

Performing Arts 

Jennifer Binford 

Assistant Professor 

BS, Utah State University 

MFA, The University of Utah 

Wayne David 

Assistant Professor 

BFA. The University of the Arts 

Manfred Fischbeck 

Adjunct Associate Professor 

BA Equivalent - Freie Universitat Berlin 

Lisa Fox 

Senior Lecturer 

BFA. University of Colorado 

Susan Glazer 

Adjunct Professor 

BA, American University 

MA. Temple University 

Theresa Greenland 

Senior Lecturer 

BS, West Chester University 

MM. Temple University 

Curt Haworth 

BFA, University of California 
MFA. Tisch. New York University 

Nancy Heller 

Professor 

BA, Middlebury College 

MA. PhD. Rutgers University 

Nancy Kantra 

BA. University of Colorado 
MFA, Philadelphia College of 
Performing Arts 



Ronen Koresh 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 

Donald Lunsford 

BFA, University of the Arts 

Molly Misgalla 

Assistant Professor 
BA. Point Park College 

Brie Neff 

Lecturer 

BFA, Temple University 

R.JeannineOsayande 

Adjunct Associate Professor 

Andrew Pap 

Associate Professor 

Baccalaureat Diploma, Scoala de 
Coreogrefie. Cluj. Romania 

Dance Education Degree, Certificate of 
Professor of Ballet, Ministry of Culture 
and Education, Bucharest, Romania 

LaVaughn Robinson 

Adjunct Professor 

Brian Sanders 

BFA, The University of the Arts 

Pearl Schaeffer 

Adjunct Associate Professor 
BS, Drexel University 
MFA, Philadelphia College of 
Performing Arts 

Jon Sherman 

Adjimct Assistant Professor 
BS, Temple University 

Carole Sklaroff 

Adjunct Associate Professor 

Suzanne Slenn 

Adjunct Associate Professor 

Faye Snow 

Adjunct Associate Professor 
BS, West Chester State College 
MA, George Washington University 

Eva Szabo 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 
Diploma, Ballet Institute, Budapest, 
Hungary 

EliseTropea 

Adjunct Associate Professor 

BS, Bennington College 

MS, Hahnemann Medical College 



Connie Vandarakis 

Assistant Professor 
BS, Northern Illinois University 
Doctor of Education candidate, 
Temple University 

School of Music 

PaulAdkins 

Senior Lecturer 

BS, West Virginia University 
Professional Certificate. 
Academy of Vocal Arts 

George Akerley 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 
BM, Philadelphia Musical Academy 
MM. Philadelphia College of 
Performing Arts 

Carl Allen 

Senior Lecturer 

BM, William Paterson University 

Steve Beskrone 

Senior Lecturer 

John Blake 

Adjunct Associate Professor 

BM, West Virginia State University 

Robert Brosh 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 
BA. Glassboro State College 
MA, DA. New York University 

Brian Brown 

Senior Lecturer 
BM. MM, Juilliard 

Jimmy Bruno 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 

Donald Chittum 

Professor 

BM, MM, DM, Philadelphia 
Conservatory of Music 

Andrea Clearfield 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 
BA. Muhlenberg College 
MM. Philadelphia College of 

Performing Arts 
DMA. Temple University 

Meg Clifton 

Lecturer 

BM, MM, University of the Arts 



86 



The University of the Ans Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



Norman David 

Adjunct Associate Professor 
BA, McGill University 
MM, New England Conservatory 
DMA, Temple University 

Marc Dicciani 

Adjunct Professor 

BM. Philadelphia Musical Academy 

Annette DiMedio 

Professor 

BA, Swarthmore College 
MM, Temple University 
PhD, Bryn Mawr College 

Samuel Dockery 

Senior Lecturer 

BM, Philadelphia College of 
Performing Arts 

John Dulik 

Lecturer 

BM, Philadelphia Musical Academy 

MM, DMA, Temple University 

Craig Ebner 

Senior Lecturer 
BM, Hartt School of Music, 
University of Hartford 

Charles Fambrough 

Senior Lecturer 

Chris Farr 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 

BM, MAT, The University of the Arts 

John Fedchock 

Senior Lecturer 

BME, Ohio State University 

MM, Eastman School of Music 

Matt Gallagher 

Senior Lecturer 

BS, West Chester University 

MM, University of the Arts 

William Garton 

Senior Lecturer 

BA, MA, Glassboro State College 

Richard Genovese 

Adjimct Assistant Professor 
Certificate, Curtis Institute of Music 

Thomas Giacabetti 

Senior Lecturer 



Don Glanden 

Assistant Professor 
BS, West Chester University 
BM, North Texas University 
MM, Rutgers University 

Janice Goltz 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 

BM, Philadelphia Musical Academy 

BME, Philadelphia College of 

Performing Arts 
MME, Temple University 

Robert Goltz 

Senior Lecturer 

BS, West Chester University 

MA, Beaver College 

Steven Goodsell 

Lecturer 

BS. State University of New York. 
Fredonia 

Theodore Greenberg 

Senior Lecturer 

BM, Philadelphia College of 
Performing Arts 

Orlando Haddad 

Senior Lecturer 

BM, North Carolina School for the Arts 

MS, Drexel University 

Tim Hagans 

Senior Lecturer 

Rick Hall 

Senior Lecturer 

Dave Hartl 

Assistant Professor 

BM, West Chester State University 

Richard Hotchkiss 

Senior Lecturer 

BM, Philadelphia Colleges of the Arts 

Luke Housner 

Lecturer 

BM, Oberlin College Conservatory 

of Music 
MM, University of Illinois 

Damon Ireland 

BM, Hartl College of Music 

Joseph Jackson 

Lecturer 

BA,MA, McKendre College 



Jeffjarvis 

Senior Lecturer 

Micah Jones 

Assistant Professor 

BM, Temple University 

MM, The University of the Arts 

Patrick Jones 

Associate Professor 

BS, West Chester University 

Diploma of Fine Arts, 

University of Calgary 
MA, George Mason University 
PhD, Pennsylvania State University 

Michael Kennedy 

Senior Lecturer 

BM, MM, The University of the Arts 

Ronald Kerber 

Associate Professor 
BM. Philadelphia College of 
Performing Arts 

Jeffrey Kern 

Assistant Professor 

BS, Lebanon Valley College 

MM, University of Michigan 

John Knebl 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 

BM, BME, Philadelphia Musical 

Academy 
MA, Villanova University 

Kevin MacConnell 

Senior Lecturer 

Tony Marino 

Senior Lecturer 

Pat Martino 

Senior Lecturer 

Christopher Maute 

lecturer 

BM, The University of the Arts 

Frank Mazzeo 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 
BS, West Chester University 
MM, Temple University 

Kelly Meashey 

Senior Lecturer 

BME, MM Temple University 



sity of the Aits Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



87 



Patrick Mercuri 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 

BM, BME. Philadelphia Musical 

Academy 
MM, Temple University 

Tony Miceli 

Senior Lecturer 

BM, The University of the Arts 

Daniel Muller 

BM, MAT, The University of the Arts 

Joseph Nero 

Adjunct Associate Professor 
Diploma, Curtis Institute of Music 

Theodore Pasternal( 

Senior Lecturer 

BM, Philadelphia Musical Academy 
Music Ed. Certificate, 
Chestnut Hill College 

James Paxson 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 

Reginald PIndell 

Senior Lecturer 

BM, MM, Peabody Conservatory 

of Music 
Diploma, Curtis Institute of Music 

Trudy Pitts 

Adjunct Associate Professor 

BM, Philadelphia Musical Academy 

Michael Quaile 

Senior Lecturer 

BM, Philadelphia College of 

Performing Arts 
MM, The University of the Arts 

George Rabbai 

Senior Lecturer 

Mathew Reese 

BM, BS Penn State University 
MA, George Mason University 

Thomas Rudolph 

Senior Lecturer 

BM, Philadelphia College of 

Performing Arts 
MM, West Chester University 
DME, Widener University 

Anthony Salicondro 

Senior Lecturer 

BM, Philadelphia Musical Academy 



Anne Sciolla 

Senior Lecturer 

BM, Philadelphia College of 
Performing Arts 

Marlon Simon 

Senior Lecturer 

BFA, New School for Social Research 

Suzanne Snizel< 

Senior Lecturer 

BA, Indiana University 

MM, The University of the Arts 

Evan Solot 

Professor 

BM, BME, MM, Philadelphia Musical 
Academy 

Patricia Stasis 

Adjunct Assistant Pjvfessor 
Diploma, Curtis Institute 
Diploma, Munich Conservatory of Music 

Edward Stimson 

Senior Lecturer 

BS, West Chester University 

John Swana 

Senior Lecturer 

Craig Thomas 

Adjunct Associate Professor 

BA, Rutgers University 

BM, Philadelphia Musical Academy 

MM, Rowan University 

David Thomas 

Senior Lecturer 

BS, Westchester University 

MM, Peabody Conservatory of Music 

Gerald Veasley 

Master Lecturer 

Elio Vlllafranca 

Senior Lecturer 

MM, University of Art, Havana, Cuba 

Dennis Wasko 

Senior Lecturer 

BM, Philadelphia College of 
Performing Arts 

Bill Zaccagni 

Assistant Professor 



School of Theater Arts 
Irene Baird 

Adjunct Associate Professor 
BFA, Carnegie-Mellon 
MFA, New York University 

James Brill 

Senior Lecturer 

Graduate, Neighborhood Playhouse 

Thea Chaloner 

Senior Lecturer • ■ 

BA, Clark University 

Jennifer Childs 

Senior Lecturer 

BFA, The University of the Arts 

Karen Cleighton 

Senior Lecturer 

Charles Conwell 

Professor 

BS, Northwestern University 

MFA, Brandeis University 

Kali Lela Cotton 

Senior Lecturer 

Aaron Cromie 

Senior Lecturer "■ 

BM, College of New Jersey 

Eric Ebbenga 

Senior Lecturer 

BM, MM, Temple University 

Mari Fielder 

Adjunct Professor 
BA, Temple University 
MA, Ohio State University 
PhD, University of California, 
Los Angeles 

Manfred Fischbeck 

Adjunct Associate Professor 

BA Equivalent - Freie Universitat, Berlin 

Charles Gilbert 

Chair Musical Theater Associate Professor 
BA, University of Delaware 
MFA, Carnegie-Mellon University 

Mary Ellen Grant-Kennedy 

Senior Lecturer 

BM, Temple University 



88 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



Theresa Greenland 

Senior Lecturer 

BS, West Chester University 

MM, Temple University 

Neill Hartley 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 
BA. SUNY Oneonta 
MFA, Temple University 

Linda Henderson 

Senior Lecturer 

MM, West Chester University 

BFA. Indiana University 

Rex Henriques 

Senior Lecturer 

Johnnie Hobbs, Jr. 

Clwir. Acting, Associate Professor 

David Howey 

Associate Professor 

Nancy Kantra 

Assistant Professor 
BA, University of Colorado 
MFA, Philadelphia College of 
Performing Arts 

Connie Koppe 

Senior Lecturer 

BS, Indiana University of Pennsylvania 

MM, Temple University 

Rebecca Lisal< 

Senior Lecturer 

BFA, University of North Carolina at 
Greensboro 

Ernest Losso 

Assistant Professor 
Carnegie-Mellon University 

Troy Martin O'Shia 

Lecturer 

BFA, Webster University 

Forrest McClendon 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 
BM, University of Connecticut 

Drucie McDaniel 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 
BA, University of Maine 

Tammy Meneghini 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 

MFA, Northern Illinois University 



David Newer 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 
BA, University of California, 

Santa Barbara 
MFA. Rutgers University 

Michael Pedretti 

Senior Lecturer 

BS, University of Wisconsin 

MA, University of Kansas 

Aaron Posner 

Adjunct Associate Professor 
BS, Northwestern University ' 

Peter Pryor 

Senior Lecturer 

BFA, The University of the Arts 

Patricia Raine 

Assistant Professor 

BM. Arizona State University 

MM, Northern Arizona University 

Owen Robbins 

Assistant Professor 

BLArch., Virginia Polytechnic Institute 

MS, University of Pennsylvania 

Ed Shocl<ley 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 
MFA, Temple University 

Leigh Smiley 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 
BA, Marlboro College 

Rick Stoppleworth 

Assistant Professor 

BS, University of Wisconsin/Madison 

MFA, Temple University 

Denise Taylor 

Senior Lecturer 

Gene Terruso 

Director, School of Theater Ans 

Professor 

AB, MA, University of Scranton 

MFA, Rutgers University 

Neal Tracy 

Adjunct Associate Professor 

BM, MM, DM, Indiana University 

Joan Twiss 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 
MFA, Rutgers University 
BSN, Ohio State University 



D'ArcyWebb 

Senior Lecturer 

BA, Point Park College 

jiri Zizi<a 

Adjunct Professor 

BA, Graphic Design School, Prague 

MFA, MWI of Chades IV. Prasue 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



89 



The School of 
Dance 



Susan B. Glazer 

sglazer@uarts.edu 
Director 
Maria Urrutia 

murrutia@uarts.edu 
Assistant to the Director 
211 South Broad Street 
215-717-6577 

The School of Dance is dedicated to the 
training of young artists for careers as pro- 
fessional performers, dance educators, and 
choreographers, and provides an intensive 
exploration of dance in its physical, intellec- 
tual, and creative aspects. The School 
provides an environment in which students 
may develop an individual artistic vision 
while being exposed to a variety of artistic 
roles. 

Facilities 

The main studios of the School of Dance 
are located in the Terra Building at 2 1 1 
South Broad Street. These spacious, bright, 
and well-lit studios are fully equipped with 
bars and mirrors, huge windows, pianos, 
and audio consoles. Their floors are con- 
structed with four-inch, state-of-the-art 
suspension for the safest and most comfort- 
able dancing surface available. Lockers, 
dressing rooms, showers, and lounges are 
found adjacent to the studios. The 
University has completely restored its his- 
toric Merriam Theater, which .serves as the 
institution's major performance hall for stu- 
dents, as well as "home" to a number of 
regional performing arts organizations, 
including the Pennsylvania Ballet. The 
UArts Dance Theater, a 150-seat theater, is 
used for student performances. The Albert 
M. Greenfield Library contains books, 
journals, and videotapes devoted to dance, 
which are available to students for research 
and coursework. 



Programs of Study 

Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) in Dance 
Bachelor of Fine Arts in Dance Education 
(BFA Dance Ed) 
Certificate in Dance — two-year program 

Majors 

Ballet 

Jazz/Theater Dance 
Modem Dance 
Dance Education 

Bachelor of Fine Arts in Dance: 
Ballet, Modern, or 
Jazz/Theater Dance 

The Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) degree 
in Dance is a program designed for those 
students who wish to prepare for profes- 
sional careers in dance performance and/or 
choreography. The BFA in Dance program 
is normally completed in four years of full- 
time study with a total requirement of 128 
credits (130 credits for Dance Education). 

Bachelor of Fine Arts in 
Dance Education 

The Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) in 
Dance Education is a program designed 
.specifically for students whose primary 
intention is to enter the profession as a 
teacher of dance. Although there is currently 
no Pennsylvania state certification for dance 
teachers, this program includes supervised 
class teaching in schools and/or private 
dance studios. The BFA in Dance Education 
is designed as a four-year program of full- 
time study with a total requirement of 130 
credits. 

Certificate in Dance 

The Certificate in Dance is a two-year, 
55-credit program intended for those stu- 
dents who wish to concentrate exclusively 
on dance studies. This intensive program is 
designed to develop the student's familiarity 
with and proficiency in a broad spectrum of 
dance styles. The Certificate in Dance is 
awarded in recognition of achievement, and 
does not constitute an academic degree. 

Students wishing to transfer from this 
program to the Bachelor's degree program 
may apply to do so and will be required to 
obtain the approval of both the Director of 
the School of Dance and the Director of 
Liberal Arts. The Certificate in Dance is 
awarded only to students who are in resi- 
dence and are matriculated in the Certificate 
program. 



The Curriculum 

The curriculum in the School of Dance 
has been carefully organized to allow the 
students to grow to their maximum potential 
as dancers. It has been developed over the 
years by professionals who are experienced 
with the world of dance and its demands. 

Daily technique classes in ballet, modem 
dance, and jazz dance are basic to all 
courses of study and are the heart of the pro- 
gram. One year of tap is required. Each 
student must be familiar with all major 
styles of dance in order to become as versa- 
tile as possible. Dance electives offered 
every semester include African dance, 
Spanish dance, Brazilian dance. Character, 
pointe, men's class, partnering, and yoga. 

In addition to the rigorous stijdy of tech- 
nique, the dance curriculum includes: 

1 . Creative subjects such as improvisation 
and composition; 

2. Academic dance subjects such as dance 
history, music, Labanotation, anatomy/kine- 
siology, pedagogy; 

3. Ensembles, repertory, and other per- 
forming courses; 

4. Free electives including voice, acting, 
and visual arts courses. 

Declaration of Major 

In March of the sophomore year, the stu- 
dent must take an upper-divisional exam, at 
which time the student will be evaluated 
with respect to his or her requested major. 
The student is evaluated for future success 
and. if appropriate, invited to continue the 
program for the junior and senior years. The 
student must complete a Declaration of 
Major form, obtain approval for the major 
from the School of Dance, and submit the 
completed form to the Office of the 
Registrar. 

School of Dance Faculty 

Ballet 

Scott Jovovitch 
Andrew Pap 
Jon Sherman 
Carole Sklaroff 
Suzanne Slenn 
Eva Szabo 



90 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



Jazz/Theater Dance 

Peter Bertini 
Ronen Koresh 
Donald Lunsford 
Molly Misgalla 
Wayne St. David 

Modern Dance 

Kim Bears-Bailey 
Jennifer Binford 
Manfred Fischbeck 
Curt Haworth 
Nancy Kantra 
Brian Sanders 
Faye Snow 

Tap Dance 

La Vaughn Robinson ^ 
Karen Cleighton 

African Dance 

R. Jeanine Osayande 

Brazilian Dance 

Peter Bertini 

Spanish Dance 

Nancy Heller 

Dance Studies 

Ninotchka Bennahum 
Peter Bertini 
Annette DiMedio 
Manfred Fischbeck 
Susan B. Glazer 
Theresa Greenland 
Stephen Jay 
Nancy Kantra 
Pearl Schaeffer 
Elise Tropea 
Connie Vandarakis 

Accompanists 

Larissa Bell 
Hans Boman 
Asya Haykin 
Richard lannacone 
John Levis 
Tom Lowery 
Tim Motzer 
Valentina Slutsky 

Technical Director 

Jay Madara 

Costumer 

Clyde Michael Hayes 



Special Regulations/ 
Requirements 

Dance Technique Class 

Regular, consistent presence in dance 
technique classes is essential to the stu- 
dent's professional development. Dance 
technique classes meet up to five times per 
week, depending upon the course and level. 

Physical Demands of the 
Program 

To be a dance artist, students must be 
physically prepared to attend and participate 
in technique classes. Strength and stamina 
are key to the success of the education and 
training. Dancers are expected to maintain 
and support their technique through phys- 
ical conditioning in and out of class. To this 
end, it is expected that students attend all 
classes and make up those missed due to ill- 
ness or injury. 

Absences 

Unexcused absences must not exceed the 
number of credits per semester for the par- 
ticular course, i.e., in a two-credit course, 
no more than two absences are permitted. 
Extensive absences, whether "excused" or 
"unexcused," will adversely affect the 
course grade. If, after warnings, a student 
persists in not attending or participating in 
class, he/she will fail the course and be 
placed on departmental probation. 

Policy on Injury and/or Illness 

If a student is injured and cannot partici- 
pate in class, he/she is required to inform 
the faculty member and, if possible, attend 
the class. If the student is "sitting out" the 
class, he/she must first get the teacher's 
approval. To be counted as "present" the 
student will be expected to take copious 
notes of the class and/or write a research 
paper that is to be given to the teacher. If the 
injury is in the healing stage and the student 
feels able to participate in a limited way, 
he/she must again secure the approval of the 
faculty before the class begins. 

In case of illness, the student should tele- 
phone the School of Dance to keep them 
apprised of the health situation. 



Injuries/Illness Of Short-Term 
Duration: 

If a student misses class due to illness or 
injury, medical documentation is necessary 
from one of the following sources: the uni- 
versity nurse, the university trainer, or a 
medical doctor. The School of Dance needs 
to have in writing the diagnosis of the 
nature of the injury /illness, specific dates of 
how long the student will be unable to par- 
ticipate in technique classes, what, if any, 
rehabilitation is being done and, finally, 
when re-evaluation will take place. 

Longer-Term Injury/Illness 

If a student is unable to participate in 
class for two or more weeks, he/she must 
make an appointment with the Director or 
Assistant Director of the School of Dance to 
determine the course of action. If the 
injury/illness happens at the end of the 
school term or well after the mid point, the 
student might be permitted to earn the 
Incomplete grade, rather than withdrawing 
from technique courses. In this instance, the 
student will be permitted to make up the 
incomplete in the Summer World of Dance, 
or by doing additional work the following 
semester 

If the injury requires a student to miss, or 
sit out, in excess of four weeks, he/she will 
be required to withdraw from all technique 
classes. Under no circumstances may the 
student confinue to remain on the sidelines 
for more than four weeks and expect to 
receive a grade for technique classes. 

If the injury/illness requires abstaining 
from rigors of the class repeatedly, it may be 
necessary for the student to take a leave of 
absence, or to leave the program perma- 
nently. In this case, the student must present 
medical documentation to be considered for 
readmission. 

Dress Code 

The School of Dance requires the fol- 
lowing attire for all technique classes: 

Women-black leotards with black tights 
for modem and jazz: pink or black tights for 
ballet: ballet, jazz, character, and tap shoes 
are required. 

Men-black tights with white tee shirts or 
black leotard and fights and black ballet, 
jazz, and tap shoes. 

Warm-ups are permitted only during the 
first 10 minutes of a class and must then be 
removed. Failure to adhere to the dress code 
will result in the student not being able to 
take class. 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



91 



Extracurricular Activities 

All students are expected to attend all 
classes and rehearsals for which they are 
registered. Outside commitments must 
never interfere with school work. If a stu- 
dent has an outside professional 
performance, he/she must ask the Director 
for special permission to be absent from 
school, and the school's "Professional 
Engagement Form" must be completed and 
approved by the instructor and the Director 
of the School of Dance two weeks prior to 
the engagement. 

Performance Requirements 

To fulfill the curricular requirement in 
performance, every sophomore, junior, and 
senior dance major is required to participate 
in at least one perfonnance each semester in 
either faculty-directed ensembles or a senior 
student's work. 

Scheduled concerts include end-of- 
semester performances in the Merriam 
Theater, senior concerts, and freshman, 
sophomore, and junior composition con- 
certs in the UArts Dance Theater. 

Ensemble Requirements 

Sophomores are required to take a max- 
imum of one ensemble per semester. 

Junior Modem majors are required to 
take one ensemble plus Modem Repertory. 

Junior Jazz majors may take a maximum 
of two ensembles per semester. 

Junior Ballet majors may take Ballet 
Ensemble and an optional ensemble for a 
maximum of two ensembles per semester. 

Seniors may take a maximum of three 
ensembles per semester. 

If a student wishes to drop the assigned 
ensemble, he/she will not be able to register 
(or take for noncredit) another ensemble, 
unless there is a class schedule conflict. 

All students are placed in one required 
ensemble by audition. Juniors (except for 
Modem majors) and seniors may add an 
additional ensemble for credit. 



Senior Dance Concert 

One of the School's most important 
requirements for graduation is the creation of 
a senior dance concert, which includes 
responsibility for choreography, rehearsals, 
lighting, costume and sound design, and 
advertising. 

Preparation for the senior concert takes 
place during the two-semester Dance 
Production course. A faculty advisor will 
assist in the choreographic and technical 
production of the concert. Performance 
dates are chosen in September. Concerts are 
shared by several seniors. 

Requirements 

Students should refer to the School of 
Dance Senior Dance Production Guidebook 
for details. 

a. Choreography — All majors must 
choreograph at least one group piece. In 
addition, students may choreograph either a 
second group work or a solo: however, the 
total must not exceed 10 minutes. All music 
must be approved by the faculty advisors. 

b. Perfonnance — All students must per- 
form in at least one work. 

c. Technical Assistance — Each student 
must fulfdl a crew requirement in another 
student's performance either as stage man- 
ager: lighting, sound, or video technician: or 
backstage assistant. 

Responsibilities 

The University provides the theater, a 
technical director, and the basic technical 
facilities. Any additional support, special 
lighting, or sound needs must be provided 
by the student. All programs, flyers, and 
promotional materials can be duplicated by 
the dance office if presented well in advance 
of the production in a finished state. 

Evaluation 

Dance smdents view their senior concert as 
the culmination of their four years at the 
University of the Arts and an extremely 
important aspect of their college experience. 
The faculty, too, judge this performance as a 
serious demonstration of the student's ability 
as a dance artist. All senior dance students 
must present their finished choreography on a 
date scheduled by the School to a jury con- 
sisting of diree faculty members and the 
Director of the School of Dance. Evaluations 
of the content of the performance are offered 
by at least three faculty members after the 
performance. 



The production aspect of the concert is 
graded by the faculty in charge of the 
course. The final grade thus reflects both the 
process and the choreographic end result. \ 

Student Evaluations I 

Juried examinations in each technique 
take place at the end of each semester. In ! 
addition, individual conferences are sched- 
uled in December and May. At this time, the 
faculty and student explore the progress 
made in the program and review the stu- 
dent's potential for future success. 

The School of Dance recognizes that it is 
possible for a student to earn a passing 
grade in a course, yet not truly be able to 
perform on a professional level in the art 
form. In this instance, the faculty and j 

Director will advise the student of this lack | 
of promise for a future career and make sug- 
gestions for alternative career options. 

Academic Progress 

Students will receive Academic Censure, i 
as determined by the Academic Review 
Committee, for the following reasons: 

1. Semester GPA below li). ,, 

2. Failure to meet the stipulation for 
removal of Academic Censure by the 
end of the specified period will result 
in dismissal. 

Please refer to the section in the front of 
this catalog on Academic Review. j 

Professional Standards I 

and Befiavior ' 

Students are expected to maintain high 
standards of professionalism in studio, 
classroom, rehearsal, and performance com- 
mitments. Failure to follow directions, and 
absence from or lateness to rehearsals, per- 
formances, and related activities may result 
in Academic Censure including lowering of 
grade or course failure. 



92 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



Dance Core Curriculum 

The Core Curriculum is common to all 
Bachelor of Fine Arts programs in the 
School of Dance for the first two years. 
These required courses develop a solid 
foundation from which students pursue their 



Ballet Major 



127 credits 



The final two years of the Ballet inajor emphasize 
advanced technique in Ballet, including Pointe or 
Men's Ballet class. In addition. Ballet majors con- 
tinue non-major studies in either Modem or Jazz 
Dance. 



speciric ar 


eas or mterest. 










JuniorYear 


Credits 




Fall 

DA 301 A 


Ballet V 




Freshman 


Year Credits 


Sophomore Year 




4.0 


Fall 

DA 100 


Rhythm for Dancers 


1.0 


Fall 

DA 201 A 


Ballet III 


2.0 


DA .308 A 
DA 307 A 


Dance Pedagogy 1 
Ballet Repertory I 


2.0 
1.0 


DA 101 A 


Ballet 1 


2.0 


DA 203 A 


Modem Dance III 


2.0 


DA 309 A 


Partnering I 


1.0 


DA 103 A 


Modem Dance I 


2.0 


DA213A 


Jazz Dance ID 


1.0 


DA 326 A 


Modem Dance 




DA 113 A 


Jazz Dance I 


1.0 


DA 205 A 


Notation I 


2.0 




for Non-Majors V 


1.0 


DA 123 A 


Tap I 


1.0 


DA211A*> 


Dance History I 


3.0 


DA .321 A 


Pointe I or 


1.0 


DA 116 A 


Fundamentals of Dance 1 


1.0 


DA 216 


Music for Dancers 


1.0 


DA 327 A 


Men's Class I 




DA 190 


Language of Music 


1.0 


DA77X 


Dance Ensemble 


1.0 


DA 77X 


Dance Ensemble 


1.0 




Elective 


1.0 


HU281* 


Dynamic Anatomy 


3.0 




Electives 


3.0 


HUllOA 


First Year Writing I 


3.0 




Electives 


2.0 


HUXXX 


Liberal Arts 


3.0 


HU103A 


Intro, to Modemism I 


3.0 


Fall Total 




17.0 


Fall Total 




17.0 


Fall Total 
Spring 




16.0 


Spring 

DA 201 B 


Ballet IV 


2.0 


Spring 

DA 301 B 


Ballet VI 


4.0 


DA 101 B 


Ballet II 


2.0 


DA 203 B 


Modem Dance IV 


2.0 


DA 308 B 


Dance Pedagogy II 


2.0 


DA 103 B 


Modem Dance II 


2.0 


DA 213 B 


Jazz Dance IV 


1.0 


DA 307 B 


Ballet Repertory II 


1.0 


HU103B 


Intro, to Modemism I 


3.0 


DA 21 IB*' 


Dance History II 


3.0 


DA 309 B 


Partnering II 


1.0 


DA 113 B 


Jazz Dance II 


1.0 


DA 217 


Dance Composition I 


1.0 


DA 319 


Theater Functions 


1.0 


DA 123 B 


Tap II 


1.0 


DA77X 


Dance Ensemble 


1.0 


DA 324 


Character Dance 


1.0 


DA 109 


Improvisation I 


1.0 




Electives 


2.0 


DA 326 B 


Modem Dance 




DA116B 


Fundamentals of Dance II 


1.0 


HU X.X.X 


Liberal Arts 


3.0 




for Non-Majors VI 


1.0 


DA 117** 


Survey of Music 


3.0 


Spring Tota 




15.0 


DA 321 B 


Pointe II or 


1.0 


HUllOB 


Elective 

First Year Writing II 


1.0 
3.0 
18.0 


Sophomore 


Year Total: 


32.0 


DA 327 B 
DA77X 


Men's Class LI 
Dance Ensemble 
Elective 


I.O 


Spring Tota 








1.0 


Freshman Year Total; 


34.0 


* May be taken either term, and fulfills 


the Liberal 


HUXXX 


Liberal Arts 


3.0 








Arts science 


requirement. 

iberalArts discipline histo 




Spring Tota 
Junior Year 




17.0 








** Fulfills L 
ment. 


ry require- 


Total: 


.M.O 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



93 



tazz/Theater 
)ance Major 128 credits 

The Jazz/Theater Dance major emphasizes acting, 
music, and voice in addition to the technical study 
of jazz dance, and prepares students for dance 
careers related to theatrical performance. 



Senior Year 

Fall 

DA 401 A Ballet Major VII 
DA 4 1 9 A Dance Production 1 
DA 426 A Modem Dance 

for Non-Maiors VII 


4.0 
2.0 
1.0 














Junior Year Credits 


Senior Year 




Fall 

DA311A 
DA 308 A 
DA317A 


JazzV 

Dance Pedagogy I 

Dance Composition 11 


4.0 
2.0 
2.0 


Fall 

DA411A 
DA 419 A 
DA 425 A 


Jazz VII 

Dance Production I 

Ballet for Non-Majors VII 


4.0 
2.0 
1.0 


DA77X 


Dance Ensemble 
Elective 


1.0 
1.0 


DA 323 A 
DA 325 A 


Tap III 

Ballet for Non-Majors VI 


1.0 
1.0 


DA77X 


Dance Ensemble 
Elective 


1.0 
1.0 


HUXXX 

Fall Total 


Liberal Arts 


6.0 

15.0 


Choose one of the following rivo: 
DA 345 A Voice I or 
THIOOA Acting I 


1.0 


HUXXX 
Fall Total 
Spring 

DA 41 IB 
DA 419 B 
DA 425 B 
DA77X 


Liberal Arts 


6.0 
15.0 


Spring 

DA 401 B 
DA 419 B 

DA 426 B 


Ballet Major Vin 
Dance Production II 
Modem Dance 
for Non-Majors VIII 


4.0 
2.0 
1.0 


DA77X 

HUXXX 
Fall Total 


Dance Ensemble 
Electives 
Liberal Arts 


1.0 
2.0 
3.0 
17.0 


Jazz VIII 

Dance Production II 
Ballet for Non-Majors VIII 
Dance Ensemble 


4.0 
2.0 
1.0 
1.0 


DA77X 


Dance Ensembles 
Electives 


1.0 
2.0 


Spring 

DA 311 B 


Jazz VI 


4.0 


HUXXX 


Electives 
Liberal Arts 


2.0 
3.0 


HUXXX 


Liberal Arts 


3.0 


DA 308 B 


Dance Pedagogy I 


2.0 


Spring Tota 




13.0 


Spring Totai 


Total: 


13.0 
28.0 


DA 3 1 7 B Dance Composition III 
DA 3 1 9 Theater Functions 
DA 323 B Tap IV 
DA 325 B Ballet for Non-Majors VI 
Choose one of the following two: 
DA 345 B Voice II or 
THIOOB Acting II 


2.0 
1.0 
1.0 
1.0 

1.0 


Senior Year Total: 


28.0 


Senior Year 


Note: DA 326 and DA 426 may substitute 
DA 325 and DA 425. 




Note: DA 32S and DA 428 may substitute for 
DA 326 and DA 426. 


for 








DA77X 

HUXXX 
Spring Tota 


Dance Ensemble 
Elective 
Liberal Arts 


1.0 
1.0 
3.0 
17.0 




- 










Junior Year Total: 


34.0 









94 



The University of ttie Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



Modern Dance Major 


Dance Education Major 


Certificate in Dance 




128 credits 




130 credits 






55 credits 


Modem Dai 


nee majors further develop technique, 
ind composition in the area of Modem 


Students choosing to pursue the Bachelor of Fine 
Arts in Dance Education continue dance technique 








repertoire, a 


First Year 




Credits 


Dance. In addition. Modem Dance Majors also 


studies in one major area and one non 


-major area of 


Fall 






pursue non- 


major studies in either Ballet 


or Jazz 


concentration. The culmination of the 


program is 


DA 100 


Rhvthm for Dancers 


1,0 


Dance. 






an internship as a student teacher. 




DA 101 A 
DA 103 A 
DA 190 
DA 113 A 
DAI16A 
DA 123 A 


Ballet I 

Modem Dance I 
Language of Music 
Jazz Dance I 
Fundamentals of Dane 
Tapl 


2.0 


Junior Year Credits 


Junior Year 


Credits 


2.0 
1.0 
1.0 
:el I.O 
1.0 


Fall 

DA 303 A 
DA 305 A 


Modem Dance V 
Modem Repertory I 


4.0 
1.0 


Fall 

DA3XXA 
DA3XXA 


Major Technique 
Non-Major Dance 


4.0 
1.0 


DA 308 A 


Dance Pedagogy I 


2.0 


DA 308 A 


Dance Pedagogy I 


2.0 






30 


DA 317 A 
DA 322 A 


Dance Composition II 
Improvisation II 


2.0 
1.0 


DA317A 
DA77X 


Dance Composition U 
Dance Ensemble 


2.0 
1.0 


Fall Total 




12.0 


DA 325 A 


Ballet for Non-Majors V 


1.0 




Elective 


1.0 


Spring 






DA77X 


Dance Ensemble 


1.0 


HUXXX 


Liberal Arts 


6.0 


DA 101 B 


Ballet n 


2.0 


HUXXX 


Elective 
Liberal Arts 


1.0 
3.0 


Fall Total 
Spring 

DA 3XX B 
DA 3XX B 




17.0 


DA 103 B 
DA 109 


Modem Dance II 
Improvisation I 


2.0 
1.0 


Fall Total 
Spring 




16.0 


Major Technique 
Non-Major Dance 


4.0 
1.0 


DA113B 
DA116B 

DA 117 


Jazz Dance II 1.0 
Fundamentals of Dance II 1.0 
Survey of Music 3.0 


DA 303 B 
DA 305 B 
DA 308 B 
DA 317 B 
DA 319 


Modem Dance VI 
Modem Repertory II 
Dance Pedagogy II 
Dance Composition III 
Theater Functions 


4.0 
1.0 
2.0 
2.0 
1.0 


DA 308 B 
DA 317 B 
DA 319 
DA77X 


Dance Pedagogy D 
Dance Composition III 
Theater Functions 
Dance Ensemble 
Electives 


2.0 
2.0 
1.0 
1.0 
3.0 


DA 123 B 
DA 319 

Spring Total 


Tap II 

Theater Functions 

Elective 


1.0 
1.0 
1.0 
13.0 


DA 322 B 

DA32B 

DA77X 


Improvisation III 
Ballet for Non-Majors VI 
Dance Ensemble 
Elective 
Liberal Arts 


1.0 
1.0 
1.0 
1.0 
3.0 
17.0 


HUXXX 


Liberal Arts 


3.0 


First Year Total: 


25.0 


Spring Total 
Junior Year Total: 


17.0 
34.0 


Second Year 
Fall 

DA 201 A Ballet III 

DA 203 A Modem Dance III 




HUXXX 


Senior Year 




2,0 
2.0 


Spring Total 


Fall 

DA4XXA 
DA4XX 
DA 408 A 
DA419A 






Junior Year Total: 


33.0 


Major Technique 
Non-Major Dance 
Dance Symposium I 
Dance Production I 
Elective 


4.0 
1.0 
3.0 
2.0 
1.0 


DA 211 A 
DA 213 A 
DA 216 
DA 308 A 

DA77X 


Dance History I 
Jazz Dance III 
Music for Dancers 
Dance Pedagogy I 
Dance Ensemble 


3.0 
1.0 


Senior Year 




1.0 

2.0 
1.0 
30 


Fall 

DA 403 A 


Modem Dance VII 


4.0 


DA 419 A 
DA 425 A 


Dance Production I 
Ballet for Non-Majors VII 


2.0 
1.0 


HU XXX 
Fall Total 


Liberal Arts 


6.0 
17.0 


Fall Total 




15.0 


DA77X 


Dance Ensemble 


1.0 


. 






Spring 






HUXXX 
Fall Total 
Spring 

DA 403 B 
DA 419 B 
DA 425 B 


Electives 
Liberal Arts 

Modem Dance VIII 
Dance Production II 
Ballet for Non-Majors VlII 
Dance Ensemble 
Electives 


2.0 
6.0 
16.0 

4.0 
2.0 
1.0 
1.0 
2.0 


Spring 

DA 408 B Dance Symposium II 
DA 410 Student Teaching 
DA 419 B Dance Production II 

Electives 
Spring Total 
Senior Year Total: 


3.0 
7.0 
2.0 
1.0 
13.0 
30.0 


DA 201 B 
DA 203 B 
DA 21 IB 
DA 213 B 
DA 308 B 
DA77X 
DA 217 

Spring Total 


Ballet IV 

Modem Dance IV 
Dance History II 
Jazz Dance IV 
Dance Pedagogy II 
Dance Ensemble 
Dance Composition I 
Electives 


2.0 
2.0 
3.0 
1,0 
2.0 
1.0 
1.0 
3.0 


DA77X 








15.0 


HUXXX 


Liberal Arts 


3.0 
13.0 








Second Year Total: 


30.0 


Spring Total 








Senior Year Total: 


29.0 















Note: DA 328 and DA 428 max substitute for 
DA 325 and DA 425. 



The University of Uie Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



95 



The School of 
Music 



Marc Dicciani 

mdicciani@uarts.edu 

Director 

250 South Broad Street 

215-717-6342 

Mission Statement 

The mission of the School of Music at 
The University of the Arts is to train and 
educate creative musical artists. We affirm 
the central role of jazz in nurturing the 
musician's creative impulse. Improvisation, 
experimentation, and innovation are 
intrinsic to our goals and methodologies. 

The School of Music is dedicated to the 
preparation and training of musicians for a 
career in music performance, composition, 
and music education. The student's growth 
as a musician is the primary goal of 
the program. 

The music program is distinguished by its 
emphasis on American music idioms, such 
as jazz and contemporary music, and 
includes study in European and worid tradi- 
tions. The School's mission of training 
professional musicians and educators of the 
highest caliber is maintained through a con- 
servatory atmosphere, which stresses 
individualized training, and a comprehen- 
sive curriculum that includes private lessons 
with master faculty, and an abundance and 
diversity of ensembles. Coursework for 
instrumental, vocal, and composition majors 
includes jazz improvisation, jazz theory and 
ear training, arranging, orchestration, basic 
piano and jazz piano, music and computer 
technology, MIDI, recording engineering, 
music business, music histories (classical, 
jazz, American, rock), and worid music. 

Performance opportunities play an impor- 
tant part in the student's education by 
sharpening technical and improvisation 
skills, and increasing the student's command 
of repertoire and styles. The School's 
numerous performance ensembles represent 
a wide range of styles and categories of jazz 
and American music. Students are involved 
in a rigorous schedule of performances, with 
over 150 concerts and recitals presented 
each year. 

This contemporary curriculum is organ- 
ized in three degree programs: the Bachelor 
of Music in Jazz Studies, which prepares 
students for careers as music professionals 
in vocal or instrumental performance, or 



composition; the Master of Arts in Teaching 
in Music Education, which prepares stu- 
dents for certification as music teachers for 
kindergarten through 12th grade: and the 
Master of Music in Jazz Studies, which is a 
finishing program for highly advanced stu- 
dents preparing for careers as performers or 
college-level instructors. A unique aspect of 
the undergraduate program allows students 
to select a special Music Education or Jazz 
Master's track that may enable them to earn 
both a bachelor's and master's degree in 
five years. 

The School of Music faculty is made up 
of experienced and practicing professionals, 
many of whom have attained international 
stature as performing and recording artists. 
This professional faculty is supplemented 
by a long list of guest artists and a regular 
series of workshops, master classes, and 
performances with greats that has included 
Wynton Marsalis, Randy and Michael 
Brecker, Arturo Sandoval, Dave Weckl, 
Joshua Redman. Jack DeJohnette, Terence 
Blanchard, Danilo Perez. Bill Stewart, Peter 
Nero, Ernie Watts, Mike Stem, Chris Potter, 
Adam Nussbaum, Dave Liebman. Mike 
Mainieri, Gonzalo Rubalcaba, Dennis 
Rowland, Gregg Field, Grover Washington, 
Jr, Max Roach, Eddie Gomez. Phil Woods. 
Yo-Yo Ma, Ray Brown, Scott Henderson, 
John Fedchock, Pat Martino, Phil Ramone. 
Bill Watrous. Bob Mintzer, Billy Joel, Peter 
Erskine, Jon Faddis, James Moody, Marvin 
"Smitty" Smith, Dave Samuels, Rob 
McConnell, Dennis Chambers, McCoy 
Tyner, Patti Austin, Kurt Elling, Nestor 
Torres. The Yellowjackets, and Joey 
DeFrancesco. 

Founded in 1870 as the Philadelphia 
Musical Academy, which later merged with 
the Philadelphia Conservatory of Music, the 
School counts among its alumni some of the 
nation's most accomplished musicians, 
including bassist Stanley Clarke, pianists 
Kenny Barron, Andre Watts, and Sumi 
Tonooka, vocalists Florence Quivar and 
Osceola Davis, drummer Gerry Brown, sax- 
ophonist Lew Tabackin, trombonist 
Robin Eubanks, composer Vincent 
Persichetti. and TV/film composers John 
Davis and Edd Kalehoff. 

Facilities 

The School of Music is located in the 
Merriam Theater building at 250 South 
Broad Street. Facilities include fully 
equipped music studios, practice rooms, a 
class piano laboratory, and classrooms. The 
school's MARS (MIDI and Recording 



Studios) is a modem recording and music 
technology facility, with a complete 32- 
input recording studio, MIDI and computer 
labs, computer and synthesizer workstation 
labs, and an audio-for-video dubbing and 
editing lab. Most practice rooms are 
equipped with grand pianos. A suite of fully 
equipped percussion and dmmset studios is 
available for student practice. 

The University's historic Merriam 
Theater and the Arts Bank are used for stu- 
dent and faculty performances. The music 
library, located in the Merriam building, 
contains books, manuscripts, journals, 
scores, records, tapes, and compact discs, as 
well as listening and viewing facilities, a 
music education information center, and 
online access to the Intemet for students. 

Performance 
Opportunities/Ensembles 

Afro-Cuban Ensemble 

Big Band 

"Blue Note" Ensemble 

Brass Ensemble 

Brazilian Jazz Ensemble 

Brazilian Percussion Ensemble 

"Brecker Brothers" Ensemble 

Chamber Singers . ■ . 

"Charles Mingus" Ensemble 

Choms 

Dmmset Ensemble 

Fusion Ensemble 

"GRP" Ensemble 

Handbell Choir 

"Horace Silver" Ensemble 

Inter-arts Ensemble 

Jazz Guitar Ensemble 

"Jazz Messengers" Ensemble 

Jazz Lab Band 

Jazz Singers Ensemble 

Latin Jazz Ensemble 

"Maynard Ferguson" Ensemble 

"Miles Davis" Ensemble 

Musical Theater Ensemble 

New Music Ensemble 

Percussion Ensemble 

Saxophone Ensemble 

Trombone Ensemble 

Vocal Jazz Ensemble 

Worid Music Ensemble 

"Yellowjackets" Ensemble 

Faculty Recitals 

Guest Artist Concerts 

Opera Scenes 

Small Jazz Ensemble Concerts 

Student Recitals 



96 



The University of (he Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



Programs of Study 

Major Areas of Concentration 

Flute 

Clarinet 

Saxophone 

Woodwind Doubling 

Trumpet 

Trombone 

Tuba 

Guitar 

Bass (Electric and/or Upright) 

Percussion 

Drums 

Piano 

Violin 

Composition 

Voice 

Cello 

Undergraduate 
Programs 

Bachelor of Music in Jazz 
Studies in Instrumental 
Performance 

The Jazz Studies instrumental curriculum 
provides a direct and pragmatic education 
for students interested in establishing a 
career as a performer or arranger in jazz 
and/or contemporary music. Students 
receive weekly, one-hour private lessons in 
their major area with renowned artist 
teachers. Pertormance opportunities are 
plentiful in the school's award-winning jazz 
ensembles. Special courses include Jazz 
Improvisation, Jazz Theory, Jazz Ear- 
Training, Basic Piano, Jazz Piano, Jazz 
Arranging, History of Jazz. The Business of 
Music, MIDI Synthesis, Music Technology, 
Recording Engineering, Transcription and 
Analysis, Orchestration, Worid Music, 20th 
Century Music, Advanced Rhythmic 
Theory, and Advanced Improvisation. 

Woodwind majors may elect to enroll in a 
woodwind specialist program that includes 
the study of various woodwind instruments. 

Bachelor of Music in Jazz 
Studies in Vocal Performance 

The Vocal Jazz Studies program in the 
School of Music is a unique curriculum that 
provides strong training in traditional vocal 
technique, and combines skills and knowl- 
edge in a range of vocal styles and literature 
including jazz/contemporary, and classical 
and musical theater. Students receive private 
instruction in voice, and take a core of 
courses in jazz ear training, jazz theory, jazz 



history, music skills, sight singing, styles 
and diction, theory, basic piano, jazz piano, 
advanced piano, music technology, and 
careers in music. Additionally, Vocal majors 
select classes and ensembles that most accu- 
rately reflect performance and study 
interests, including jazz vocal ensembles, 
chorus, and chamber singers; and classroom 
activities such as American, Western, and 
Musical Theater music history, vocal work- 
shops, and an ongoing series of master 
classes. 

Bachelor of Music in Jazz 
Studies in Composition 

Students enrolled as majors in 
Composition take private lessons with our 
faculty who work professionally in contem- 
porary classical, jazz, and commercial 
(radio, TV, film, industrial) and pop idioms. 
Monthly workshops featuring guest com- 
posers representing a variety of musical 
genres present students with an inside look 
at their creative processes and techniques. 
Additional courses include Jazz Ear 
Training, Jazz Theory, MIDI and Music 
Technology, Arranging, Orchestration, 
Music History, Business of Music, and 
ensembles. Student compositions are read 
or pert'ormed by our ensembles, and fre- 
quent performances of students" music 
highlight the school's concert schedule. 
Composition students can also elect an 
option to take additional study on an instru- 
ment or voice. The University's creative 
environment encourages collaborations with 
film, animation, dance, theater, and multi- 
media students. 

Diploma Program 

This four-year program is designed pri- 
marily for students who wish to take the 
entire musical portion of the undergraduate 
curriculum without liberal arts courses. 
Students wishing to transfer from this pro- 
gram to the bachelor's degree program may 
apply to do so in any year of their matricula- 
tion and will be required to obtain the 
approval of both the Director of the School 
of Music and the Director of Liberal Arts. 
The Diploma program is ideal for students 
who have already earned a degree in a field 
other than music, but who want the benefit 
of a complete undergraduate training and 
education in music. 

Certificate in Music 

The two-year Certificate in Music pro- 
gram consists of the musical studies 
normally taken during the first two years of 



the Bachelor of Music program. No liberal 
arts courses are required. 

The Certificate in Music is awarded only 
to students who are in residence and are 
matriculated in the certificate program. 

MATPREP 

Master of Arts in Teaching - 
Corequisite Program 

MATPREP is a 17-credit elective course 
of study designed to satisfy corequisite 
requirements for entrance into the Master of 
Arts in Teaching in Music Education pro- 
gram. Open to all undergraduate music 
majors, classes include an Introduction to 
Music Education, Basic Conducting, Lab 
Teaching, Psychology of Music Teaching, 
and Orchestration. Completion of the MAT- 
PREP program with an average of 3.0 or 
higher in these courses and an overall cumu- 
lative GPA of 3.0 or higher satisfies most 
MAT entrance requirements. 

Graduate Programs 

Master of Arts in Teaching in 
Music Education (MAT) 

The Master of Arts in Teaching in Music 
Education is a 36-credit program designed 
for students who have completed bachelor's 
degrees in applied music, music 
theory/composition, music history /litera- 
ture, or other non-education, music-related 
curricula. The MAT can be completed in 
one academic year provided that corequisite 
requirements have been met and placement 
testing does not indicate the need for sup- 
plementary studies. Undergraduate students 
in music at the University may take advan- 
tage of the preparatory program known as 
MATPREP, a 1 7-credit course of elective 
studies that satisfies all corequisites. The 
MAT in Music Education leads to teaching 
certification in the Commonwealth of 
Pennsylvania. 

Master of Music in 
Jazz Studies 

The Master of Music in Jazz Studies is a 
32-credit program designed for students 
who have completed a bachelor's degree in 
jazz performance or other applied music 
with significant experience in jazz/contem- 
porary music studies. The MM can be 
completed in a one-year, two-semester 
schedule, providing that all prerequisite 
skills are satisfied prior to beginning the 
program. The entrance requirements include 
advanced technical and stylistic facility on 
the major instrument or voice, and skills in 



The University of tlie Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



97 



improvisation, jazz theory and ear training, 
and jazz history. The MM program is 
intended to dramatically increase the stu- 
dent's performance abilities, as well as 
provide a diversity of other professional- 
level competencies, preparing the student 
for a career as a music professional or col- 
lege-level teacher. . 



School of Music Faculty 

Applied and Ensemble Studies 
Composition 

George Akerley 

Andrea Clearfield 

Don Glanden 

Rick Hall . ' 

Evan Solot, Chair 

David Thomas 

Voice 

Paul Adkins " 
Meg Clifton 
Jeffrey Kern, Chair 
Kelly Meashey 
Reginald Pindell 
Patricia Raine 
Anne Sciolla 
Patricia Stasis 

Strings 

John Blake 
Richard Hotchkiss 

Saxophone 

Chris Farr 

Ronald Kerber, Chair 
Frank Mazzeo 
Daniel Muller 
Anthony Salicondro 
Bill Zaccagni 

Trumpet 

Matt Gallagher 

Tim Hagans 

JeffJarvis < . ,- 

George Rabbai 

JohnSwana 

Dennis Wasko, Chair 

Trombone 

John Fedchock 
Richard Genovese 
Clint Sharman 

Keyboards 

Annette DiMedio 
Samuel Dockery 
Don Glanden, Chair 
Dave Hartl 
Trudy Pitts 
Elio Villafranca 



Guitar 

Jimmy Bruno, Co-Chair 

Craig Ebner 

Thomas Giacabetti, Co-Chair 

Michael Kennedy 

Pat Martino 

Patrick Mercuri 

Michael Quaile 

Upright Jazz Bass/Electric 
Bass 

Steve Beskrone 
Charles Fambrough 
Kevin MacConnell 
Tony Marino 
Craig Thomas, Chair 
Gerald Veasley 

Percussion/Drums 

Carl Allen 
Robert Brosh 
Marc Dicciani 
Orlando Haddad 
Tony Miceli 
Joseph Nero, Chair 
James Paxson 
Marlon Simon 

Vocal Ensembles and 
Conducting 

Chorus and Chamber Singers 

Meg Clifton 

Jeffrey Kern • ' •' 

Large Jazz Ensembles 

Frank Mazzeo 
Evan Solot 
Bill Zaccagni 

Small Jazz Ensembles 

All Jazz faculty 

Music Studies 
Theory 

Donald Chittum. Chair 
Don Glanden 
Dave Hartl 
Stephen Jay 
Micah Jones 
Evan Solot 
Craig Thomas 
David Thomas 
Bill Zaccagni 



98 



The University of the Ans Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



Computer and Electronic Music 

George Akerley 
Steve Goodsell 
Dave Hartl 
Damon Ireland 
Micah Jones 
Thomas Rudolph 

Conducting 

Patrick Jones 
Jeffrey Kern 
Theodore Pasternak 

Musicianship 

Chris Farr 
Don Glanden 
Stephen Jay 
Micah Jones 
Ronald Kerber 
Jeffrey Kern 
Evan Solot 

Music History and Literature 

Robert Brosh 
Donald Chittum 
Annette DiMedio 
Bill Zaccagni 

Recording 

Steven Goodsell 
Theodore Greenberg 

Music Business 

Marc Dicciani 

Latin-American Music 

Orlando Haddad 
Marlon Simon 
Elio Villafranca 

Arranging/Orchestration 

Norman David 
Bill Zaccagni 

Class Piano 

Annette DiMedio 
Jeffrey Kern 
David Thomas 

Music Librarian 

Mark Germer 

World Music 

Robert Brosh 
Donald Chittum 



Jazz Improvisation 

Jimmy Bruno 
Chris Farr 
Don Glanden 
Ronald Kerber 
Pat Martino 
Tony Miceli 
Michael Quaile 
John Swana 
Craig Thomas 

Music Education - 
Undergraduate and Graduate 
Studies 

Marc Dicciani 
Annette DiMedio 
William Garton 
Janice Goltz 
Robert Goltz 
Patrick Jones. Chair 
Jeffrey Kern 
John Knebl 
Theodore Pasternak 
Thomas Rudolph 
Anthony Salicondro 
Dennis Wasko 



Special Regulations/ 
Requirements 

Attendance 

The number of hours of "Unexcused 
Absences" permitted per semester in the 
School of Music may not exceed the 
number of credits per course, i.e., in a three- 
credit course, no more than three hours of 
unexcused absences are permitted; in a two- 
credit course, no more that two hours of 
unexcused absences are permitted, etc. 

Attendance at Lessons 

Students must attend all private lessons as 
scheduled except in the case of illness or 
emergency. It is the student's responsibility 
to notify the teacher if he/she is unable to 
keep the appointment time. Failure to give 
at least 24 hours prior notice may result in 
forfeiture of the lesson. A maximum of 
three lessons per semester will be made up 
in the case of excused absences. 

Lessons missed because of unexcused 
absences will not be made up. 

Lessons missed due to the teacher's 
absence will be rescheduled and made up by 
the teacher, or his/her designee. 

Unless circumstances render it impos- 
sible, "make-up" lessons for the Fail 
semester are to be completed prior to the 
Spring semester: "make-up" lessons for the 
Spring must be completed by June 15. 

Normally, students are entitled to 28 one- 
hour lessons during the academic year ( 14 
per semester). 

Change of Major Teacher 

Students who wish to petition for a 
change of major teacher must: 

1 . Secure a "Request for Change of Major 
Teacher" form from the Director of the 
School of Music. 

2. State reasons for requesting a change 
of teacher. 

3. Obtain the signed approval of the 
present and the requested teacher. 

4. Obtain the signed approval of the 
department chair. 

5. Obtain the signed approval of the 
Director of the School of Music. 

Such changes are not usually effected in 
mid-semester If the change is approved 
during the semester, in addition to the 
process stated above, the student must also 
complete a Drop/Add form to correct the 
current major teacher designation. The 
Drop/Add form must be signed by the 
Director of the School of Music and sub- 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



99 



mitted by the student to the Office of the 
Registrar. 

Faculty Advisors 

All students are assigned to a faculty 
advisor. Lists are posted in the Merriam 
Lobby during the first week of the academic 
year. Students should feel free to see their 
advisor at any time concerning problems 
that they may encounter. 

Appointments can be made at the mutual 
convenience of the student and the faculty 
advisor. 

Jury Examinations 

All first, second, and third-year music 
majors must take a jury examinafion in their 
applied area upon the completion of the 
second, fourth, and sixth semesters of applied 
study. This usually occurs in May during the 
week immediately following classroom 
examinations. However, students who began 
their matriculation in midyear, transferred 
from another institution, or have failed their 
jury in a prior year may be scheduled to take 
the examination in December. 

Students are evaluated in comparison to 
the Minimum Applied Jury Requirements in 
their major. A list of these requirements is 
given to each student by his/her major 
teacher at the beginning of each year. The 
jury consists of at least two faculty members 
in addition to the major teacher (who may 
be present but may not grade). The jury 
examination is graded "Pass/Fail." but also 
includes areas of optional letter grading 
evaluation. 

Failure in any single "Pass/Fail" aspect of 
the jury examination constitutes an "F' 
(Failure) in the entire jury examination. A 
student who fails the jury fails the entire 
semester in the applied major; the examina- 
tion may not be retaken. A grade of "F" will 
appear on the student's transcript for both the 
major lessons and the jury exam, and the stu- 
dent will receive no credit for the semester's 
work in major lessons. The student must 
repeat the failed semester of applied study 
and retake the jury examination at the com- 
pletion of the next semester. A student who 
fails the same semester jury examination 
more than once, or who fails a total of more 
than one jury examination during his/her 
matriculation at the University, will be rec- 
ommended for dismissal. 

The requirements that are tested in the 
jury examination are those that have been 
established, by a departmental faculty com- 
mittee, to be the minimum set of skills and 
knowledge necessary for successful com- 



pletion of applied study. Requirements are 
established for each year of study and are 
considered cumulative: e.g., a jury examina- 
tion of a second-year student may include 
requirements from the first year. 

It is possible for a student to pass the jury 
examination and yet receive a failing grade 
in the major, due to the different grading 
and evaluation criteria for each. However, a 
student who fails the jury will receive a 
failure in the major. 

Jury Recital Requirements 

Regulations regarding jury examinations 
and Senior Recitals are available in the 
office of the School of Music. 

Academic Progress 

Students will receive Academic Censure, 
as determined by the Academic Review 
Committee, for the following reasons: 

1. Semester GPA below 2.0. 

2. Grade below "B-" (2.67) in the fol- 
lowing major courses: Major Lessons 
(MU 192-692 A/B) 

3. Failure to meet the stipulation for 
removal of Academic Censure by the 
end of the specified period will result 
in dismissal. 

"First Wednesday" 

The first Wednesday of each month is 
devoted to faculty and guest recitals, lec- 
tures, master classes, and workshops, as 
well as student performances. 

Music majors should not schedule other 
commitments during the time designated as 
First Wednesday. In addition, all music stu- 
dents are encouraged to attend student and 
professional performances on a regular basis. 

Professional Standards 
and Behavior 

Students are required to maintain high 
standards of professionalism in studio, 
classroom, rehearsal, and performance com- 
mitments. Failure to follow directions, and 
absence from or lateness to rehearsals, per- 
fonnances, and related activities may result 
in Academic Censure, including lowering of 
grades or course failure. 

Applied Workshops 

Workshops in each applied major/depart- 
ment are scheduled at least four times each 
semester. Faculty and guests teach an array 
of topics that are supplemental and sup- 
portive to the major lesson. Attendance and 
participation are required as part of the 
grade in the major. 



Graduation Requirements 

In addition to the general CPA require- 
ments for graduation, the following must be 
fulfilled: 

Undergraduate Requirements 

1 . Performance majors must present a sat- 
isfactory graduation recital before the public 
("satisfactory" performance to be determined 
by majority vote of a faculty jury). 

2. Composition majors must submit a sat- 
isfactory substantial work in the senior year, 
to be publicly performed, adjudicated by the 
Composition faculty. 

3. The recital must include musical 
selections as stipulated by the faculty, and 
must conform to School of Music recital 
requirements. 

Exit Requirements for the 
MAT in Music Education 

Successful completion of all course and 
related requirements shall lead to the granting 
of the Master of Arts in Teaching with a 
major in Music Education, provided that an 
overall GPA of 3.0 or higher is maintained. 
However, approval of the MAT in Music 
Education Committee is required for recom- 
mendation for teacher certification. It should 
be noted also that the initial Instructional I 
Certificate cannot be issued by the 
Commonwealth of Pennsylvania Department 
of Education unless PDE testing requirements 
have been met. 

Exit Requirements for the 
Master of Music in Jazz Studies 

All MM students must complete a satis- 
factory graduate project and a graduate 
recital in order to meet the degree require- 
ments for completion of the Master of 
Music. 

The recital must include musical selec- 
tions as stipulated by the major teacher and 
department, and must conform to the guide- 
lines as stated in the school policy 
governing recitals. 

All MM candidates are required to main- 
tain a cumulative GPA of at least a 3.0. 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



Bachelor of Music in Jazz 
Studies-Instrumental 
Performance 126 credits 



Freshman 


Credits 


Junior 


Credits 


Fait 


Fall 






MU192A 


Applied Major Instruction 


3.0 


MU392A 


Applied Major Instruction 


3.0 


MU107A 


Music Theory 1 


3.0 


MU7XX 


Ensemble 


1.0 


MU103A 


Musicianship 1 


3.0 


MU310 


Transcription and Analysis 


1.0 


MUlOO 


Major Workshop 


1.0 




Electives 


3.0 


MU113 


Freshman Improvisation 


1.0 


MU401A* 


* Jazz History 


3.0 


MU131A 


Class Piano I 


I.O 


HUXXX 


Liberal Arts 


6.0 


MU115 


Music Technology Survey 


1.0 


Fall Total 




17.0 


HUllOA 


First Year Writing I 


3.0 


Spring 






Fall Total 




15.0 


MU 392 B 


Applied Major Instruction 


3.0 


Spring 






MU7XX 


Ensemble 


1.0 


MU192B 


Applied Major Instruction 


3.0 


MU311 


Transcription and Analysis 


1.0 


MU107B 


Music Theory 11 


3.0 




Electives 


3.0 


MU103B 


Musicianship 11 


3.0 


MUXXX 


Music Elective 


3.0 


MUI13 


Freshman Improvisation 


1.0 


MU 030 


Jury Examination 





MU131B 


Class Piano 11 


1.0 


HUXXX 


Liberal Arts 


6.0 


MU116 


Music Technology Survey 


1.0 


Spring Total 




17.0 


HUllOB 
MUOlO 


First Year Writing II 
Jury Examination 

;ar Total 


3.0 



15.0 
30.0 


Junior Year Total 


34.0 


Spring Total 


Senior 






Freshman Y( 


Fall 

MU492A 


.Applied Major Instruction 










3.0 


Sophomore 




MU301A*^ 


* Music History I 


3.0 


Fall 






MU7XX 


Ensemble 


2.0 


MU292A 


Applied Major Instruction 


3.0 




Electives 


3.0 


MU208A 


Jazz Theory I 


3.0 


HUXXX 


Liberal Arts 


3.0 


MU209A 


Jazz Ear Training I 


3.0 


Fall Total 




14.0 


MU7XX 


Ensemble 


1.0 


Spring 

MU492B 

MU301B*^ 

MU7XX 






MU232A 
MU213A 
HUI03A 


Class Jazz Piano I 
Jazz Improvisation I 
Intro, to Modernism I 


1.0 

2.0 
3.0 


Applied Major Instruction 
* Music History II 
Ensemble 


3.0 
3.0 
2.0 


Fall Total 




16.0 


HUXXX 


Liberal Arts 


6.0 


Spring 






MU040t 


Senior Recital 





MU 292 B 


Applied Major Instruction 


3.0 


Select one of the following mo; 




MU 208 B 


Jazz Theory II 


3.0 


MU420A* 


Business of Music 


2.0 


MU 209 B 


Jazz Ear Training II 


3.0 


MU420 B 


Careers in Music 




MU7XX 


Ensemble 


1.0 


Spring Total 




16.0 


MU232B 
MU213B 


Class Jazz Piano II 
Jazz Improvisation II 
Intro, to Modernism II 


1.0 
2.0 
3.0 


Senior Year Total 


29.0 


HU 103 B 








MU 020 


Jury Examination 











Spring Total 




16.0 








Sophomore ' 


Year Total: 


32.0 









N.B. All instrumental majors are required to suc- 
cessfully complete one year of Chorus, which 
may be taken as ensemble or elective credits. 
Piano {MU 131 MB) and Jazz Piano (MU 232 
A/Bj are not required for piano majors. Instead, 
substitute four elective credits. 
* All undergraduate music students must take 
either Business of Music (MU 420 A) or Careers 
in Music (MU 420 B). Students who take both 
may apply one toward elective credits. 
f Senior Recital may be completed either 
semester 

** Also fulfills Liberal Arts discipline history 
requirement. 



The University of ttie Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



Bachelor of Music in Jazz 
Studies- Vocal Performance 

126 credits 



Freshman 



Credits 



Fad 

MU19IA Applied Major Instruction 3.0 

MU107A Music Theory I 3.0 

MU103A Musicianship I 3.0 

MU139 Vocal Styles and Diction I 1.0 

MU772 Chorus 1.0 

MU131A Class Piano I 1.0 

MU 115 Music Technology Survey 1.0 

HU 1 1 A First Year Writing I 3.0 

Fall Total 16.0 
Spring 

MU191B Applied Major Instruction 3.0 

MUI07B Music Theory II 3.0 

MU103B Musicianship II 3.0 

MU 140 Vocal Styles and Diction I. II 1.0 

MU772 Chorus 1.0 

MU131B Class Piano II 1.0 

MU116 Music Technology Survey 1.0 

HUllOB First Year Writing II 3.0 

MUOlO Jury Examination 

Spring Total 16.0 



Freshman Year Total 



32.0 



Sopliomore 



Fall 






MU 291 A 


Applied Major Instniction 


3.0 


MU208A 


Jazz Theory I 


3.0 


MU209A 


Jazz Ear Training 1 


3.0 


MU772 


Chorus 


1.0 


MU232A 


Class Jazz Piano I 


1.0 


MU213A 


Jazz Improvisation I 


2.0 


HU 103 A 


Intro, to Modernism I 


3.0 


Fall Total 


/ 


16.0 


Spring 






MU291B 


Applied Major Instruction 


3.0 


MU 208 B 


Jazz Theory II 


3.0 


MU209B 


Jazz Ear Training II 


3.0 


MU772 


Chorus 


1.0 


MU232B 


Class Jazz Piano II 


1.0 


MU213B 


Jazz Improvisation II 


2.0 


HU103B 


Intro, to Modernism 11 


3.0 


MU020 


Jur)' Examination 





Spring Tota 




16.0 



Junior 



Credits 



Fall 

MU391A Applied Major Instruction 3.0 

MU7XX Ensemble I.O 

MU772 Chorus 1.0 
MU 33 1 B Advanced Piano and 

Accompanying 1.0 

MU 401 A** Jazz History 3.0 

Electives 3.0 

HUXXX Liberal Arts 6.0 

Fall Total 18.0 
Spring 

MU39IB Applied Major Instruction 3.0 

MU7XX Ensemble 1.0 

MU772 Chorus 1.0 
MU 33 1 B Advanced Piano and 

Accompanying 1.0 

MU030 Jury Examination 

Electives 3.0 

HUXXX Liberal Arts 6.0 

Spring Total 15.0 



Junior Year Total 



33.0 



Senior 



Fall 

MU 49 1 A Applied Major Instruction 3.0 

MU772 Chorus 1.0 

MU7XX Ensemble 1.0 
Select one of the following two: 

MU420A Business of Music 2.0 
MU 420 B Careers in Music 

MU 301 A** Music History I 3.0 

Electives 3.0 

HUXXX Liberal Arts 3.0 

Fall Total 16.0 
Spring 

MU491B Applied Major Instruction 3.0 

MU772 Chorus 1.0 

MU7XX Ensemble 1.0 

MU 040t Senior Recital 

MU 301 B** Music Histor>' II 3.0 

HU XXX Liberal Arts 6.0 

Spring Total 13.0 



Senior Year Total 



29.0 



All undergraduate Music students must take either 

Business of Music (MU 420 A ) or Careers in Music (MU 

420 B). Students who take both may apply one toward 

elective credits. 

f Senior Recital may be completed either term. 

** Also fulfills liberal arts discipline history requirement. 



Sophomore Year Total 



32.0 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



Bachelor of Music in Jazz 
Studies- Composition 126 credits 



Freshmar 


Credits 


Junior 


Credits 


Fall 


Fall 






MU193A 


Applied Major Instruction 


3.0 


MU393A 


Applied Major Instruction 


3.0 


MU107A 


Music Theory I 


3.0 


MU401A* 


* Jazz History 


3.0 


MU103A 


Musicianship I 


3.0 


MU7XX 


Ensemble 


1.0 


MU7XX 


Ensemble 


1.0 


MU415A 


Intro, to MIDI and Electronic 


MUI31A 


Class Piano I 


1.0 




Technology 


3.0 


MU115 


Music Technology Survey 


1.0 


HUXXX 


Liberal Arts 


3.0 


HUllOA 


First Year Writing I 


3.0 




Electives 


3.0 


Fall Total 




15.0 


Fall Total 




16.0 


Spring 






Spring 






MU 193 B 


Applied Major Instruction 


3.0 


MU 393 B 


Applied Major Instruction 


3.0 


MU107B 


Music Theory II 


3.0 


MU7XX 


Ensemble 


1.0 


MU 103 B 


Musicianship II 


3.0 


MU3I7A 


Orchestration I 


3.0 


MU7XX 


Ensemble 


1.0 


MUXXX 


Music Elective 


3.0 


MU131B 


Class Piano II 


1.0 


MU030 


Jury Examination 





MU1I6 


Music Technology Survey 


I.O 


HUXXX 


Liberal Arts 


6.0 


MUOlO 


Jury Examination 





Spring Tota 




16.0 ■ 


HUllOB 
Spring Tota 
Freshman Y 


First Year Writing II 


3.0 
15.0 


Junior Year Total 


32.0 


;ar Total 


30.0 


Senior 








Fall 














Sophomore 




MU493A 


Applied Major Instruction 


3.0 


Fall 






MU 301 A* 


' Music History I 


3.0 


MU293A 


Applied Major Instruction 


3.0 


MU7XX 


Ensemble 


1.0 


MU208A 


Jazz Theory I 


3.0 


Select one of the following nvo: 




MU209A 


Jazz Ear Training I 


3.0 


MU420A* 


Business in Music 


2.0 


MU7XX 


Ensemble 


1.0 


MU420B 


Careers in Music 




MU232A 


Class Jazz Piano I 


1.0 




Electives 


3.0 


MU315A 


Jazz Arranging I 


2.0 


HUXXX 


Liberal Arts 


6.0 


HU103A 


Intro, to Modernism I 


3.0 


Fall Total , 




18.0 


Fall Total ' 




16.0 


Spring 






Spring 






MU493B 


Applied Major Instruction 


3.0 


MU 293 B 


Applied Major Instruction 


3.0 


MU30IB*> 


Music History II 


3.0 


MU208B 


Jazz Theory II 


3.0 


MU7XX 


Ensemble 


1.0 


MU209B 


Jazz Ear Training II 


3.0 


MU 040t 


Senior Recital 





MU7XX 


Ensemble 


1.0 




Electives 


3.0 


MU 232 B 


Class Jazz Piano II 


1.0 


HUXXX 


Liberal Arts 


6.0 


MU020 


Jury Examination 





Spring Total 




16.0 


HU 103 B 
Spring Total 


Intro, to Modernism II 
fear Total 


3.0 
14.0 

30.0 


Senior Year Total 


34.0 


Sophomore ^ 









N.B. Ml composition majors are required to successfully 

complete one year of Chorus, which may be taken as 

ensemble or elective credits. 

*All undergraduate music students must take either 

Business of Music (MU 420 A) or Careers in Music 

(MU 420 B). Students who take both may apply one 

toward elective credits. 

f Senior Recital may be completed either term. 

"' Also fulfills liberal arts discipline history requirement. 



Tlie University of tlie Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



103 



Diploma in Music in Jazz 
Studies-Instrumental 
Performance 104 credits 



Diploma in Music in Jazz 
Studies- Vocal Performance 



104 credits 



Freshman 



Credits 



Junior 



Credits 



Freshman 



Credits 



Fall 

MU192A 

MU107A 

MU103A 

MUlOO 

MU113 

MU7XX 

MU 131 B 

MU115 

Fall Total 

Spring 

MU192B 

MU107B 

MU103B 

MU113 

MU7XX 

MU131B 

MU116 

MUOlO 

Spring Total 



Applied Major Instruction 
Music Theory I 
Musicianship I 
Major Workshop 
Freshman Improvisation 
Ensemble 
Class Piano I 
Music Technology Survey 



Applied Major Instruction 
Music Theory II 
Musicianship II 
Freshman Improvisation 
Ensemble 
Class Piano II 
Music Technology Survey 
Jury Examination 



Freshman Year Total 



Sophomore 



.0 

.0 

13.0 

3.0 
3.0 
3.0 
1.0 
1.0 
1.0 
1.0 

13.0 



26.0 



Fall 

MU 292 A Applied Major Instruction 3.0 

MU208A Jazz Theory I 3.0 

MU 209 A Jazz Ear Training I 3.6 

MU 7XX Ensembles 2.0 

MU 232 A Class Jazz Piano I 1 .0 

MU213A Jazz Improvisation 2.0 

Fall Total 14.0 
Spring 

MU292B Applied Major Instruction 3.0 

MU208B Jazz Theory 1 3.0 

MU209B Jazz Ear Training II 3.0 

MU 7XX Ensembles 2.0 

MU 232 B Class Jazz Piano II 1.0 

MU213B Jazz Improvisation 2.0 

MU 020 Jury Examination 

Spring Total 14.0 



Sophomore Year Total 



28.0 



Fall 

MU392A 
MU7XX 
MU310 
MU401A 

Fall Total 
Spring 

MU 392 B 

MU7XX 

MU311 

MUXXX 

MU030 



Applied Major Instruction 
Ensembles 

Transcription and Analysis 
Jazz History 
Electives 



Applied Major Instruction 

Ensembles 

Transcription and Analysis 

Music Elective 

Jury Examination 

Electives 



3.0 
2.0 
1.0 
3.0 
3.0 
12.0 

3.0 

2.0 

1.0 

3.0 



3.0 



Spring Total 


12.0 


Junior Year Total 


24.0 


Senior 



Fall 

MU492A Applied Major Instruction 3.0 

MU 7XX Ensembles 2.0 

MU420A Business of Music 2.0 

MU 040t Senior Recital 

MU 301 A Music History I 3.0 

Electives 3.0 

Fall Total 13.0 
Spring 

MU492B Applied Major Instruction 3.0 

MU 7XX Ensembles 2.0 

MU 420 B Careers in Music 2.0 

MU040t Senior Recital 

MU301B Music History I, II 3.0 

Electives 3.0 

Spring Total 13.0 



Senior Year Total 



26.( 



N.B. All instrunienlal majors are required to successfully 

complete one year of Chorus (MU 772), which may be 

taken as ensemble or elective credits. 

Piano (MUISIA/B) and Jazz Piano (MU 232 A/B) are 

not required for piano majors. Instead, substitute four 

elective credits. 

t Senior Recital may be completed either term. 



Fall 

MU191A 

MU107A 

MU103A 

MU139 

MU772 

MU131A 

MU115 

Fall Total 

Spring 

MU191B 

MU 107 B 

MU 103 B 

MU140 

MU772 

MU131B 

MU116 

MUOlO 

Spring Total 



Applied Major Instruction 

Music Theory I 

Musicianship I 

Vocal Styles and Diction I 

Chorus 

Class Piano I 

Music Technology Survey 



Applied Major Instruction 

Music Theory II 

Musicianship II 

Vocal Styles and Diction II 

Chorus 

Class Piano II 

Music Technology Survey 

Jury Examination 



3.0 
3.0 
3.0 
1.0 
1.0 
1.0 
1.0 
13.0 

3.0 
3.0 
3.0 
1.0 
1.0 
1.0 
1.0 

13.0 



Freshman Year Total 



26,0 



Sophomore 



Fall 






MU29IA 


Applied Major Instruction 


3.0 


MU208A 


Jazz Theory I 


3.0 


MU209A 


Jazz Ear Training I 


3.0 


MU772 


Chorus 


1.0 


MU7XX 


Ensemble 


1.0 


MU232A 


Class Jazz Piano I 


1.0 


MU213A 


Jazz Improvisation I 


2.0 


Fall Total 




14.0 


Spring 






MU291B 


Applied Major Instruction 


3.0 


MU 208 B 


Jazz Theory II 


3.0 


MU 209 B 


Jazz Ear Training II 


3.0 


MU772 


Chorus 


1.0 


MU 7XX 


Ensemble 


1.0 


MU 232 B 


Class Jazz Piano II 


1.0 


MU213B 


Jazz Improvisation n 


2.0 


MU020 


Jury Examination 





Spring Tola 




14.0 



Sophomore Year Total 



28.0 



104 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



Junior 



Credits 



Fall 

MU391A Applied Major Instruction 3.0 

MU7XX Ensemble 1.0 

MU772 Chorus 1.0 
MU 33 1 A Advanced Piano and 

Accompanying 1 .0 

MU401A Jazz History 3.0 

Electives 3.0 

Fall Total 12.0 
Spring 

MU391B Applied Major Instruction 3.0 

MU7XX Ensemble 1.0 

MU772 Chorus 1.0 

MU XXX Music Elective 3.0 
MU 33 1 B Advanced Piano and 

Accompanying 1 .0 

MU 030 Jury Examination 

Electives 3.0 

Spring Total 12.0 



Junior Year Total 



24.0 



Senior 



Fall 

MU491A Applied Major Instruction 3.0 

MU772 Chorus 1.0 

MU7XX Ensemble 1.0 

MU420A Business of Music 2.0 

MU 040t Senior Recital 

MU301A Music History I 3.0 

Electives 3.0 

Fall Total ■ 13.0 
Spring 

MU491B Applied Major Instruction 3.0 

MU772 Chorus 1.0 

MU7XX Ensemble 1.0 

MU 420 B Careers in Music 2.0 

MU040t Senior Recital 

MU 301 B Music History 3.0 

Electives 3.0 

Spring Total 13.0 



Senior Year Total 



26.0 



f Senior Recital may be completed either tern. 



Diploma in Music in Jazz 
Studies- Composition 

104 credits 



Freshman 



Credits 



Junior 



Credits 



Fall 








Fall 






MU193A 


Apphed Major Instruction 


3.0 


MU393A 


Applied Major Instruction 


3.0 


MU107A 


Music Theory 




3.0 


MU7XX 


Ensembles 


2.0 


MUI03A 


Musicianship I 




3.0 


MU317A 


Orchestration I 


3.0 


MU7XX 


Ensemble 




1.0 


MU415A 


Intro, to MIDI and Electronic 


MU131A 


Class Piano 




I.O 




Technology 


3.0 


MU115 


Music Technology 


Survey 


1.0 


MU030 


Jury Examination 





Fall Total 






12.0 


MU401A 


Jazz History 


3.0 


Spring 








Fall Total 




14.0 


MU 193 B 


Applied Major Instruction 


3.0 


Spring 






MU 107 B 


Music Theory 




3.0 


MU 393 B 


Applied Major Instruction 


3.0 


MU103B 


Musicianship II 




3.0 


MU311 


Transcription and Analysis 


1.0 


MU7XX 


Ensemble 




1.0 


MU7XX 


Ensembles 


2.0 


MU131B 


Class Piano 




1.0 


MUXXX 


Music Elective 


3.0 


MU116 


Music Technology 


Sur\'ev 


1.0 


MU030 


Jury Examination 





MUOlO 


Jury Examination 









Electives 


3.0 


Spring Total 






12.0 


Spring Tota 




12.0 



Freshman Year Total 



Junior Year Total 



26.0 



Sophomore 



Senior 



Fall 






Fall 






MU293A 


Applied Major Instruction 


3.0 


MU493A 


Applied Major Instruction 


3.0 


MU208A 


Jazz Theory I 


3.0 


MU7XX 


Ensembles 


2.0 


MU209A 


Jazz Ear Training I 


3.0 


MU420A 


Business of Music 


2.0 


MU7XX 


Ensemble 


1.0 


MU30IA 


Music History 


3.0 


MU232A 


Class Jazz Piano 


1.0 




Electives 


3.0 


MU315A 


Jazz Arranging I 


2.0 


Fall Total 




13.0 


Fall Total 




13.0 


Spring 






Spring 






MU493B 


Applied Major Instruction 


3.0 


MU 293 B 


Applied Major Instruction 


3.0 


MU7XX 


Ensembles 


2.0 


MU 208 B 


Jazz Theory II 


3.0 


MU420B 


Careers in Music 


2.0 


MU 209 B 


Jazz Ear Training II 


3.0 


MU 040t 


Senior Recital 





MU7XX 


Ensemble 


1.0 


MU301B 


Music History 


3.0 


MU 232 B 


Class Jazz Piano 


1.0 




Electives 


3.0 


MUXXX 


Music Elective 


3.0 


Spnng Tota 




13.0 


MU020 
Spring Total 


Jury Examination 



14.0 


Senior Year Total 


26.0 



Sophomore Year Total 



27,0 



N.B. All composition majors are required to suc- 
cessfully complete one year of Chorus, which may 
be taken as ensemble or elective credits. 

t Senior Recital may be completed either semester 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



105 



Certificate in Music in Jazz 
Studies- Instrumental 
Performance 54credi 



Certificate in Music in Jazz 
Studies- Vocal Performance 



First Year 



Credits 



First Year 



Credits 



Fall 






Fall 






MU192A 


Applied Major Instruction 


3.0 


MU191A 


Applied Major Instruction 


3.0 


MU107A 


Music Theory I, II 


3.0 


MU107A 


Music Theory 1 


3.0 


MU103A 


Musicianship 


3.0 


MU103A 


Musicianship I 


3.0 


MUIOO 


Major Workshop 


1.0 


MU 139 


Vocal Styles and Diction I 


1.0 


MU7XX 


Ensemble 


1.0 


MU7XX 


Ensemble 


1.0 


MU131A 


Class Piano 


1.0 


MU131A 


Class Piano I 


1.0 


MU115 


Music Technology Survey 


1.0 


MU115 


Music Technology Survey 


1.0 


Fall Total 




13.0 


Fall Total 




13.0 


Spring 






Spring 






MU192B 


Applied Major Instruction 


3.0 


MU191B 


Applied Major Instruction 


3.0 


MU 107 B 


Music Theory 1, 11 


3.0 


MU 107 B 


Music Theory 11 


3.0 


MU 103 B 


Musicianship 


3.0 


MU 103 B 


Musicianship II 


3.0 


MU113 


Freshman Improvisation 


1.0 


MU140 


Vocal Styles and Diction II 


1.0 


MU7XX 


Ensemble 


1.0 


MU7XX 


Ensemble 


1.0 


MU131B 


Class Piano 


1.0 


MU131B 


Class Piano n 


1.0 


MU116 


Music Technology Survey 


1.0 


MU116 


Music Technology Survey 


1.0 


MUOlO 


Jury Examination 





MUOlO 


Jury Examination 





Spring Total 




13.0 


Spring Tota 




13.0 



First Year Total 



26.0 



First Year Total 



26.0 



Second Year 



Second Year 



Fall 






Fall 






MU292A 


Applied Major Instruction 


3.0 


MU291A 


Applied Major Instruction 


3.0 


MU208A 


Jazz Theory 1, 11 


3.0 


MU208A 


Jazz Theory I 


3.0 


MU209A 


Jazz Ear Training I. II 


3.0 


MU209A 


Jazz Ear Training I 


3.0 


MU7XX 


Ensembles 


2.0 


MU7XX 


Ensembles 


2.0 


MU232A 


Class Jazz Piano 1, 


1.0 


MU232A 


Class Jazz Piano 


1.0 


MU213A 


Jazz Improvisation I, II 


2.0 


MU2I3A 


Jazz Improvisation I 


2.0 


Fall Total 




14.0 


Fall Total 




14.0 


Spring 






Spring 






MU 292 B 


Applied Major Instruction 


3.0 


MU291B 


Applied Major Instruction 


3.0 


MU 208 B 


Jazz Theory I. II 


3.0 


MU 208 B 


Jazz Theory II 


3.0 


MU 209 B 


Jazz Ear Training I, II 


3.0 


MU 209 B 


Jazz Ear Training II 


3.0 


MU7XX 


Ensembles 


2.0 


MU7XX 


Ensembles 


2.0 


MU232B 


Class Jazz Piano I, II 


1.0 


MU 232 B 


Class Jazz Piano 


1.0 


MU213B 


Jazz Improvisation I, II 


2.0 


MU213B 


Jazz Improvisation II 


2.0 


MU020 


Jury Examination 





MU020 


Jury Examination 





Spring Total 




14.0 


Spring Tota 




14.0 



Second Year Total 



Second Year Total 



28.0 



N.B. Piano (MU 131 A/B) and Jazz Piano (MU 232 
A/Bj are not required for piano majors. Instead, 
substitute four elective credits. 



io6 



Tlie University of Itie Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



Music Education matprep 



Preparatory Program for the 
Master of Arts in Teaching 

All undergraduate degree students in 
music at The University of the Arts may 
enroll in and take advantage of the MAT in 
Music Education Preparatory Program 
(MATPREP). Completion of this program 
allows students to satisfy all corequisite 
requirements for admission to the MAT in 
Music program. MATPREP is also an 
important means for maintaining continuity 
between undergraduate and graduate experi- 
ences, and for fostering communication 
between students and faculty in Music 
Education. 

Admission to the University as a 
BM/MAT student in Music indicates accept- 
ance into the Bachelor of Music program 
and into the MATPREP program. Full 
admission to the MAT in Music Education 
program must be granted prior to the begin- 
ning of graduate-level instruction on the 
same basis as other MAT candidates. 

A minimum grade-point average of 3.0 in 
MATPREP courses and a minimum overall 
cumulative grade-point average of 3.0 must 
be achieved in order to be considered as a 
candidate for admission into the MAT in 
Music Education Program. 



Course 


Credits 


MU151A 


Intro, to Music Education I 


1.0 


MU151B 


Intro, to Music Education n 


1.0 


MU257A 


Lab Teaching/Practicum I 


2.0 


MU 257 B 


Lab Teaching/Practicum II 


2.0 


MU254 


Basic Conducting 


2.0 


MU356A 


Music Teaching Skills I 


1.0 


MU 356 B 


Music Teaching Skills II 


1.0 


MU451A 


Psychology of 






Music Teaching I 


2.0 


MU451B 


Psychology of 






Music Teaching II 


2.0 


MU317A 


Orchestration I 


3.0 


Total Credit 




17.0 



The University of tlie Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



107 



Music Education 

Master of Arts in 
Teaching 

Patrick M. Jones 

pjones@uarts.edu 
Division Head 
215-717-6356 

The Master of Arts in Teaching in Music 
Education is an advanced teacher certifica- 
tion program designed to prepare 
individuals with established musical skills 
and subject matter mastery for successful 
careers in teaching and education-related 
fields. It is a unique program in that candi- 
dates for the MAT in Music Education 
typically will have completed undergraduate 
studies in applied music, composition, 
theory, history /literature, or other profes- 
sional areas. After satisfying Pennsylvania 
standardized testing requirements, MAT 
graduates will be eligible to receive K-12 
certification in music from the 
Commonwealth of Pennsylvania 
Department of Education. In addition, com- 
pletion of the MAT program fulfills 
confinuing studies requirements, so that 
after three years of full-time teaching 
service, graduates may apply for permanent 
certification without taking additional 
courses. 

Music Education graduates of the 
University of the Arts are currently serving 
successfully as teachers, supervisors, school 
administrators, and in education-related 
fields such as computer software develop- 
ment, broadcasting, law and the arts, and 
private studio teaching, and as professional 
performers, composers, and arrangers. 

The MAT curriculum in music education 
comprises 36 credits and may be completed 
in one academic year schedule, if all prereq- 
uisites are satisfied prior to matriculafion. ' 
Prerequisite requirements may be satisfied 
in a number of ways, including taking 
courses in the undergraduate MATPREP 
program. Professionals in the field may 
choose to complete the Master of Arts in 
Teaching in Music Education over an 
extended period of time on a part-time 
basis. The following listing presents the 
normal sequence of courses if completed 
within one year: 



MAT in Music Education 
Faculty 

Marc Dicciani 
Annette DiMedio 
William Garten 
Richard Genovese 
Janice Goltz ' 

Patrick M. Jones 
Jeffrey Kern 
John Knebl 
Christopher Maute 
Thomas Rudolph 
Anthony Salicondro 
Dennis Wasko 



Music Education 

Master of Arts in Teaching 

36 credits 



Fall 


MU55I 


Education in 






American Society 


3.0 


MU552 


Workshop in Vocal Methods 


2.0 


MU 553 


Music and Special Children 


2.0 


MU554A 


Elementary Methods 






and Materials 


3.0 


MU555 


Elementary Student Teachin 


2 4.0 


MU560A 


Workshop in 






Instrumental Methods I 


2.0 


MU558 


Student Teaching 






Seminar and Major Project 


2.0 


Fall Total 




18.0 


Spring 


MU550 


Advanced Conducting - 






Choral or Instrumental 


3.0 


MU 554 B 


Secondary Methods 






and Materials 


3.0 


MU556 


Secondary Student Teaching 


4.0 


MU557 


Music Administration 






and Supen'ision 


3.0 


MU559 


Research, Evaluation, and 
Technology in 






Music Education 


3,0 


MU 560 B 


Workshop in 






Instrumental Methods n 


2.0 


Spring Iota 




18.0 


Total Credits 


36.0 



io8 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



Jazz Studies 

Master of Music 

Don Glanden 

dglanden@uarts.edu 
Chair, Graduate Jazz Studies 
215-717-6353 



The Master of Music in Jazz Studies 
degree has its roots in three decades of 
University of the Arts leadership in the field 
of jazz education, carefully balancing aes- 
thetic goals and a pragmatic approach to 
vocational responsibility in the context of 
this American music idiom. Open to a small 
and highly advanced group of students who 
have an undergraduate degree in jazz studies 
or an undergraduate degree in music with 
significant experience in jazz and contem- 
porary music, or the equivalent thereof, the 
program- while providing a solid founda- 
tion in contemporary music- encourages a 
primary focus on individual career goals. 

Curriculum 

Among the one-year, 32-credit program's 
unique curricular components are advanced 
private instruction in the major area to 
develop professional-level artistry and 
skills: hands-on internships and pedagogy 
study; ensemble performances; arranging, 
composing, transcribing and analyzing jazz 
and contemporary music; study of MIDI 
and music technology; and a final 
thesis/project/ recital that integrates in- 
depth research on a topic of special 
relevance with personal musical growdi, 
culminating in a public performance. 
Graduate Applied Studies are the core 
of the Master of Music in Jazz Studies. 
Additionally, applied study at the graduate 
level includes a pedagogy component. 
Teaching is a facet of almost every per- 
former's and composer's career; coursework 
in the major applied area acknowledges this 
importance. 

Students, in addition to completion of the 
requisite 32 credits, must take or have taken 
two corequisite courses of two credit hours 
each; Recording and The Business of 
Music. 



MM in Jazz Studies Faculty 

Strings 

John Blake 

Saxophione 

Chris Farr 
Ronald Kerber 
Frank Mazzeo 
Anthony Salicondro 
Bill Zaccagni 

Trumpet 

Matt Gallagher 
Tim Hagans 
Jeff Jarvis 
George Rabbai 
John Swana 
Dennis Wasko 

Trombone 

John Fedchook 
Richard Genovese 
Clint Sharman 

Keyboards 

Samuel Dockery 
Don Glanden 
Trudy Pitts 
Elio Villafranca 

Guitar 

Jimmy Bruno 
Craig Ebner 
Thomas Giacabetti 
Pat Martino 
Patrick Mercuri 
Michael Quaile 

Upright Jazz Bass/Electric 
Bass 

Steve Beskrone 
Charles Fambrough 
Kevin MacConnell 
Tony Marino 
Craig Thomas 
Gerald Veasley 

Percussion/Drums 

Carl Allen 
Robert Brosh 
Marc Dicciani 
Tony Miceli 
Joseph Nero 
James Paxson 
Marlon Simon 



Voice 

Kelly Meashey 
Reginald Pindell 
Anne ScioUa 

Large Jazz Ensembles 

Frank Mazzeo 
Evan Solot 
Bill Zaccagni 

Small Jazz Ensembles 

All Jazz Faculty 

Composition and Arranging 

Evan Solot 
Bill Zaccagni 

Recording 

Steven Goodsell 

Latin American Music 

Orlando Haddad 
Marlon Simon 
Elio Villafranca 

Music Technology 

Steven Goodsell 
Thomas Rudolph 

Jazz Improvisation and 
Transcription 

Jimmy Bruno 
Chris Farr 
Thomas Giacabetti 
Don Glanden 
Ronald Kerber 
Pat Martino 
Tony Miceli 
John Swana 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



109 



MM in Jazz Studies 



Fall 


Credits 


MU592A 


Applied Major Instruction 


3,0 


MU615 


MIDI and Music Technology 2.0 


MU617 


Advanced Transcription 






and Analysis 


3.0 


MU620 


Professional Internship 


1.0 


MU622 


Graduate Arranging 


2.0 


MU625 


Advanced Improvisation 


2.0 


MU 627 


Graduate Forum 


1.0 


MU764 


Ensembles 


2.0 


Fall Total 




16.0 


Spring 


MU 592 B 


Applied Major Instruction 


3.0 


MU616 


MIDI and Music Technolog 


y2.0 


MU621 


Professional Internship 


1.0 


MU624 


Composing for Performers 


2.0 


MU626 


Graduate Improvisation 


2.0 


MU628 


Graduate Forum 


I.O 


MU764 


Ensembles 


2.0 


MU603 


Graduate Project/Recital 


3.0 


Spring Total 




16.0 


Total Credits 


32.0 



Additional prerequisite/corequisite courses: 
MU413 Recording 2.0 

MU 420 Business of Music 2.0 

Total 4.0 

Total Credits with corequisites 36.0 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



The School of 
Theater Arts 



GeneTerruso 

gten-uso@uarts.edu 
Director 
Nan Gilbert 

ngilbert@uarts.edu 
Assistant Director 
211 South Broad Street 
215-717-6450 

The School of Theater Arts of The 
University of the Arts is committed to devel- 
oping the skills and professionalism of its 
students to prepare them for careers in the 
theater and related fields, or for advanced 
study in graduate or conservatory programs. 

The goal of the theater school is to culti- 
vate practitioners for the live theater 
entertainment media, communications, and 
production. This is achieved by developing 
a practical knowledge and competence that 
include sensitivity to technique, artistry, and 
style, as well as an insight into the role of 
the theater arts. 

All of the School's degree programs 
employ a professional approach to training 
and highly rigorous standards for evaluation 
and retention. As with any theater program, 
production work may serve as an important 
means of gauging a student's growth in 
his/her respective program. It is in the 
studio, however, where the primary efforts 
of both student and faculty are concentrated. 
The highly focused and demanding training 
is enhanced by appropriate courses in the 
liberal arts. These are of particular impor- 
tance to the theater artist, who is charged 
with commenting on the human condition. 
The effectiveness of that commentary is 
dependent upon a sincere commitment to 
excellence in liberal arts. 

All programs within the School of Theater 
Arts require 123 credits for graduation. 

Facilities 

Most facilities for the School of Theater 
Arts are located in UArts' new Terra 
Building at 21 1 South Broad Street. These 
include seminar and classroom spaces, and 
studios for individual voice instruction, 
speech, dance, movement, and acting. The 
studios are well-lit and individually 
equipped with prop storage and audiovisual 
capabilities. Lockers and lounges are 
located adjacent to the studios. 
Performances are held at three sites: the 



ArtsBank, a technically up-to-date, 240-seat 
theater at 601 South Broad Street that also 
houses additional instructional spaces; the 
University's historic Merriam Theater at 
250 South Broad Street: and a 
new flexible black box space at the 
Gershman Y, 401 South Broad Street, where 
stage combat classes are also held. Design 
and technical support are provided by a pro- 
duction shop, areas for both property and 
costume stock, and a video editing studio 
inside the ArtsBank. The Albert M. 
Greenfield Library contains books, journals, 
and videotapes devoted to the theater arts, 
which are available to students for research 
and coursework. 

Programs of Study 

The curriculum is conservatory-based, 
acknowledging that the focal point of 
training in both the Bachelor of Fine Arts 
Acting and Bachelor of Fine Arts Musical 
Theater programs is the acting instruction, 
and that vocal and physical training are the 
principal support areas for this instruction. 
The first responsibility of the faculty is to 
invest students with a foundation technique- 
a rehearsal/performance process-which they 
will continue to refine and personalize as 
their creative development evolves. 

Opportunifies for master classes, guest 
speakers, internships, and apprenticeships 
with many professional companies in the 
city and region are among the experiences 
open to students in all School of Theater 
Arts programs. 

Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) 
Acting Program 

The four-year Bachelor of Fine Arts 
Acting program prepares students for 
careers in the professional theater or for 
continued study at the graduate level. In the 
first year, students concentrate on finding 
the "core of the actor" through the study of 
improvisation, monologue, emotional dis- 
covery, speech, and movement. In addition 
to fostering these acting skills, the first year 
of training is also designed to encourage an 
in-depth self-analysis of the student's com- 
mitment, discipline, and professionalism. 
The second year is devoted to technique 
training, in which actors develop a sense of 
conversational reality and strengthen their 
imagination, responsiveness, and spon- 
taneity. This level of training also addresses 
an actor's skill for evoking a full and acces- 
sible inner life. 

The third year is dedicated to giving 
shape and specificity to the actor's behavior 



and aims to refine technique and deepen 
characterization. Advanced scene study and 
an introduction to style work are also inte- 
gral to this level of training. The focus of 
the fourth year is on classical performance 
and preparing the student to enter the pro- 
fession. Students are given instruction in 
audition and camera techniques, resume 
preparation, how to work with agents, etc. 
The fourth year culminates with an audition 
clinic given by a selected panel of agents, 
directors, and casting representatives. 

Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) 
Musical Theater Program 

The four-year Bachelor of Fine Arts 
Musical Theater Program prepares students 
for professional careers as perfonners in the 
musical theater or for continued study in 
graduate school. The program defines the 
term "musical theater" in a way that 
embraces the richness and diversity of this 
challenging interdisciplinary ail form, 
which includes musical comedy, the 
musical play (in the Hammerstein- 
Sondheim tradition), new and alternative 
music theater, "Broadway opera," cabaret, 
and revue. Students receive the same tech- 
nique training as do acting majors through 
their first five semesters. This training is 
complemented by training in vocal tech- 
nique, musicianship and dance, and the 
study of the repertoire of the musical theater 
in print, recordings, and in rehearsal and 
performance. 

Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) in 
Applied Theater Arts 

The Bachelor of Fine Arts in Applied 
Theater Arts allows students with a range of 
theatrical interests to shape their own indi- 
vidualized course of study. It is designed to 
give students the practical, artistic, and 
intellectual foundation necessary for a suc- 
cessful professional life in live theater and 
allied disciplines. Student artists may focus 
on theatrical disciplines such as mask, stage 
combat, stage management, playwriting, 
directing, dramaturgy, production, and arts 
administration. 

Practical studio and production training, 
received in a student's first two years, is 
enriched by an understanding of the theater 
as an art, an industry, and an institution, 
with a history and a vital role in society. 

This foundation training will prepare the 
student to emphasize one or more of the 
above-mentioned disciplines at the upper- 
division levels and shape her/his own 
curriculum. Much of the senior year in the 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



ATA program is shaped by production proj- 
ects, independent study, and internships 
arranged through the School's close associa- 
tion with professional companies in the 
area. 

This program may prove a good choice 
for students who are drawn to the collabora- 
tive nature of theater. It is an ideal program 
of study for the student who has a profound 
passion for theater and/or the entertainment 
field, but whose long-term interest may lie 
outside performing. At the same time, it is a 
curriculum that places that student at the 
heart of the production process. The pro- 
gram is also well-suited to students who 
may have an interest in advanced or grad- 
uate study. 

Stage Combat Program 

The School of Theater Arts is home to 
one of the nation's most renowned stage 
combat programs, serving as host to the 
annual Philadelphia Stage Combat 
Workshop. It is one of only a handful of 
institutions that offers the option of an 
eight-semester sequence of combat training. 
One semester of combat is required for all 
BFA Acting majors. Although not a degree 
program in itself, students completing the 
requisite course of study are tested on 
campus each year and, if found proficient, 
certified by the Society of American Fight 
Directors. A year ago, the program was 
ranked third in the country, based on the 
number of certified stage combatants that 
emerged from its ranks. 



The Curriculum 

BFA Programs in Acting and 

Musical Theater 

Actor training in the School of Theater 
Arts lies at the heart of the two-performance 
curricula. The training is designed to culti- 
vate the actor's ability to "live truthfully 
under imaginary circumstances." Students 
develop an understanding that such truth 
begins with a shared interconnectedness 
between actors onstage. 

Early technique studies, for majors in 
both acting and musical theater, emphasize 
the "reality of doing" as it is rooted in a full 
emotional life, driven by action and 
expressed with meaning, clarity, and theatri- 
cality. To this end, students are challenged 
to cultivate a fuller understanding of them- 
selves, and to continually exercise their 
skills as analysts of text and as observers of 
human behavior. 

The program introduces students to a 
range of approaches (Linklater, Meisner, 
LeCoq, Williamson. Fitzmaurice, Laban) as 
a part of their training. The successful stu- 
dent should emerge from the program with 
a practicable performance technique in 
place, which enables her/him to develop and 
sustain a role from first rehearsal to closing 
night. 

Students completing these programs are 
also expected to be knowledgeable about a 
variety of styles and types of drama, and the 
challenges presented by each: to work in a 
vocally and physically free and efficient 
manner; to be able to identify their character 
type and its potential range within the 
casting conventions of the industry; to have 
a sense of how to begin to establish a career 
as a performer; and to possess a work ethic 
that will support the collaborative nature of 
theatrical production. 

The Musical Theater Program seeks to 
train students who: 

• use the singing voice in a vibrant, 
healthy, and dramatically effective 
manner; 

• understand music as the singing actor's 
second text and clearly present its 
expressive intentions; 

• have a solid dance technique and a com- 
mand of the language of dance and 
movement; and 

• integrate all component skills of 
musical theater performance to create 
consistentiy honest and expressive 
behavior. 

Additionally, the Acting Program seeks to 
train students who have developed: 

• fundamental skills in stage combat and 



the use of selected weaponry; 

• an awareness of mask techniques as a 
platform from which characterization 
and behavior can evolve; 

• basic skills in performing for the 
camera, a familiarity with their image in 
two-dimensional media, and some 
experience in fundamental issues such 
as slating, continuity, hitting marks, 
working within frame, etc.; and 

• scene study skills that will serve them in 
the interpretation of classical material 
that requires a command of both style 
and language. 

BFA Program in Applied 
Theater Arts 

A theater artist must be well-versed in a 
variety of disciplines, each vital in itself and 
intimately related to all that occurs in a pro- 
duction effort. The student majoring in the 
BFA in Applied Theater Arts is called upon 
to develop competencies across a spectrum 
of these disciplines. As such, he/she will 
study playwriting, acting, combat, mask, 
stage management, directing, administra- 
tion, theater history, and dramatic literature- 
all in a context that supports theatrical pro- 
duction. This program is designed to 
provide practical tiaining for the 
student/artist who possesses a collaborative 
perspective. The BFA in Applied Theater 
Arts (ATA) allows the student/artist, in 
his/her junior year, to move toward a con- 
centration in a particular area of emphasis, 
such as many of those mentioned here. 

Upon declaring a concentration in one of 
these fields, a student will complete his/her 
course of study via a series of production 
practica and independent study projects. 
Internships, arranged through the School's 
outstanding relationship with area profes- 
sional theaters, will further strengthen the 
student's skills and enhance his/her profes- 
sional viability. The student completing this 
program will be prepared to enter the 
industry on either the production or the 
administrative end, and may pursue a range 
of career options or choose to pursue further 
study in dramaturgy, directing, or several of 
the above fields. 

Production Season 

The School of Theater Arts presents at 
least 12 major productions a year- six in 
our subscription series, and six more in our 
studio series. These include comedies, 
dramas, and musicals. Plays are selected 
based on the educational and competitive 
needs of the current casting pool, and on a 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



four-year cycle representing styles and 
genres to which the faculty feels students 
should be exposed. 

All students in performance majors are 
required to audition for all School-spon- 
sored shows and to accept roles as cast, 
unless excused as provided for in the School 
of Theater Arts Student Handbook. Students 
are also required to attend each production. 
These audition and attendance requirements 
will be part of all acting studio syllabi. 
Failure to comply with these requirements 
will have a direct impact upon one's grade 
in acting studio. 

Absences 

Students in the School of Theater Arts are 
expected to attend all classes, studios, work- 
shops, rehearsals, and crews for which they 
are registered or otherwise committed. 

Generally, the School of Theater Arts 
does not make a distinction between an 
excused and unexcused absence. Rather it 
recognizes that in the course of a student's 
studies, circumstances may arise that, in the 
student's judgment, may require absence or 
lateness. The general policy of the School of 
Theater is that any number of absences that 
result in the student missing more than the 
equivalent of two weeks' work will result in 
failure or require withdrawal from the 
course in question. This standard may be 
somewhat more severe for acting studios. 

Students should consult the syllabi for 
any given course to see how this policy 
applies to the course's number of weekly 
meetings and contact hours. Please refer to 
the "Absences" section of Academic 
Regulations in this catalog for more infor- 
mation, and to the Theater Arts Student 
Handbook. 

Advisors 

Students are assigned advisors when they 
enter the School of Theater Arts. Advisory 
lists are posted in the theater lounge during 
the first week of the academic year. The 
advisor conveys information from the fac- 
ulty to the student and counsels the student 
in artistic and academic matters. The stu- 
dent, however, is wholly responsible for 
fulfilling his or her artistic and academic 
obligations, and for meeting the require- 
ments for graduation. 

Call Boards 

All Theater students must check the call 
boards daily and will be responsible for all 
official notices posted there within 24 hours. 

The call boards are used for the posting 



of all rehearsal and crew notices, as well as 
School and professional audition notices. 

Crew Assignments 

All students are required to serve on pro- 
duction crews in their second through fifth 
semesters. Crew assignments and calls are 
scheduled and monitored by the Production 
Office, located in the main School of 
Theater office. 

All crew members are expected to be 
prompt for crew calls. Lateness will not be 
tolerated. Attendance at all crew calls is 
mandatory. There are no unexcused 
absences permitted. A student who misses a 
crew call without prior permission from the 
Production Office will receive an "F' for the 
semester. 

Extracurricular Activities 

Students in the School of Theater Arts 
may not participate in any theater projects 
outside the University prior to completion 
of five semesters in the School of Theater 
Arts. Even students who have achieved 
junior status must formally apply in writing 
to the University director for such permis- 
sion //) advance of auditioning or 
intenieMing for such work. Students 
involved with such projects without the 
director's authorization will receive a grade 
of "F" in their major studio and be restricted 
from moving forward in their core classes 
(see "Academic Progress"). A second occur- 
ance may result in dismissal from the 
School. Instructors are specifically directed 
not to allow the absences nor scheduling 
arrangements that may provide such oppor- 
tunities. 

Pliysical Demands of the 
Program 

The Theater Arts program is physically 
demanding. Good health and its mainte- 
nance are of paramount importance to an 
actor. 

Occasional illness or injuries are, of 
course, justification for short-term absences. 
Specific chronic physical or emotional dis- 
orders that impair attendance or ability to 
function within the program over a longer 
period of time should be covered by a 
formal leave of absence. 

In either case, the student should confer 
with his or her advisor as soon as a potential 
health problem arises. 



Professional Standards 
and Betiavior 

Students are expected to maintain high 
standards of professionalism in studio, 
classroom, rehearsal, and performance com- 
mitments. Professionalism in rehearsal and 
production is a factor in the grading for 
Acting studio. Failure to follow directions 
and absence from or lateness to rehearsals, 
performances, and related activities may 
result in Academic Censure including low- 
ering of grade or course failure. 

Academic Progress 

A professional training environment and 
an academic en\'ironment have goals that 
are at once mutual and distinct. Within a tra- 
ditional university, a student receiving a 
grade of C may feel that he/she has done 
"adequate" work and is entitled to continue 
in his/her course of training. As a university, 
UArts recognizes this right. By the stan- 
dards required of professional training, 
however, an "adequate" grade does not sug- 
gest a student's viability within the 
entertainment industry. Further, the world of 
play production is a meritocracy - i.e., 
being in a play is not a right; it is earned by 
a consistentiy demonstrated work ethic, 
command of material, and strength of skills. 
As such, the School of Theater Arts has 
developed the following standards by which 
the purposes of both the academic experi- 
ence and the requirements of professional 
training and production will be served. 

The following are considered core courses: 

Acting Major 

TH103A Acting Studio I 

TH103B Acting Studio II 

TH 109 A Voice and Speech for Actors I 

TH 109 B Voice and Speech for Actors H 

TH 1 1 5 A Movement for Actors I 

TH 223 Acting Studio III 

TH 224 Acting Studio IV 

TH209A Speech for Actors III 

TH209B Speech for Actors IV 

TH215A Movement for Actors III 

TH215B Movement for Actors IV 

TH309 Speech for Actors V 

TH310 Speech for Actors VI 

TH315A Movement for Actors V 

TH 3 1 5 B Movement for Actors VI 

TH 323 Acting Studio: Technique III 

TH 324 Acting Studio: Poetic Realism 

TH 4 1 5 A Movement for Actors VII 

TH 423 Acting Studio: Verse Drama I 

TH 424 Acting Studio: Verse Drama II 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



"3 



Musical Theater Major 

TH 103 A Acting Studio I 

TH 103 B Acting Studio II 

TH 14 1 A Voice for Musical Theater I 

TH 141 B Voice For Musical Theater II 

TH 142 A Voice Lesson - Musical Theater 

TH142B Voice Lesson 

TH 223 Acting Studio: Technique I 

TH 224 Acting Studio: Technique II 

TH 24 1 Foundations of Singing/Acting 

TH 242 A Voice Lesson - Musical Theater 

TH242B Voice Lesson 

TH 3 1 8 A Musical Theater Repertory 

TH318B Musical Theater Repertory 

TH 323 Acting Studio: Technique III 

TH 324 Acting Studio: Poetic Realism 

TH 34 1 A Voice for Musical Theater V 

TH 34 1 B Voice for Musical Theater VI 

TH 342 A Voice Lesson - Musical Theater 

TH342B Voice Lesson 

TH 423 Acting Studio: Verse Drama I 

TH 424 Acting Studio: Verse Drama II 

TH 44 1 A Voice for Musical Theater: 

Cabaret/Audition 

TH 441 B Voice for Musical Theater: 

Cabaret/Audition 

TH 442 A Voice Lesson - Musical Theater 

TH442B Voice Lesson 

Applied Theater Arts 

THI03A Acting Studio I 

TH103B Acting Studio II 

THI03L Crew 

TH123 Scene & Lighting Tech I 

TH 1 23 L Scene & Lighting Tech Lab 

TH 124 Costume & Property Tech 

TH 124 L Costume & Property Tech Lab 

TH 227 Fund, of Stage Management 

TH317 Fund, of Directing 

HU 322 Scriptwriting 

THXXX Theater Management 

TH 327 Advanced Stage Management 

TH 3XX Production Practicum 

TH 3XX Production Practicum 

TH 3XX Production Practicum 

TH 430 Stage to Video Production 

TH 4XX Senior Project 

TH 4XX Senior Project 

TH4XX ATA Seminar 

To remain in good standing for casting 
consideration or production assignments in 
the School of Theater Arts, a student must 
receive a grade of B or better in the core 
courses listed above. In the view of the 
SOTA faculty, a student whose work fails to 
meet this level of achievement will be con- 
sidered non-competitive by professional 
standards. The following grades may result 
in the actions indicated: 



Grades of B-, C+, or C in core courses: 

• student placed on Casting Restriction or 
Production Restriction. 

Grade of C- in core courses: 

• student placed on Probation (refer to 
"Academic Censure" in this bulletin for 
more information), and 

• student placed on Casting Restriction or 
Production Restriction. 

Grades of D, D-i- or F in core courses: 

• student placed on Probation (refer to 
"Academic Censure" in this bulletin for 
more information); 

• student placed on Casting Restriction or 
Production Restriction; 

• student receives no course credit for an 
F grade, elective credit only for the 
grade of D or D-i-; 

• student may not advance to the next 
semester of any core training class until 
the course has been repeated with a 
grade of C- or better; and 

• both the original grade and repeated 
grade will remain on the transcript and 
will be applied to a student's cumulative 
GPA. 

Warnings 

The School's obligation to its students is 
to keep them abreast of their progress by 
personal contact and review. A student will 
be warned if his/her performance in class is 
below par as defined by the instructor's 
expectations expressed in the class syllabus, 
rules, etc. Such warning will be issued as a 
part of ongoing studio critiques, in a formal 
verbal fashion at the student's in-person 
evaluation (or jury), and in writing as a ■ 
follow-up to that evaluation. A student may 
also receive such warning if he/she lacks 
seriousness of purpose, demonstrates attitu- 
dinal behavior that proves disruptive to the 
ensemble or educational process, is exces- 
sively tardy, is not prepared to work in class, 
or is not seriously committed to profes- 
sional training. 

Evaluations 

In the School of Theater Arts, progress 
from one semester to the next is based not 
only on successful completion of course 
work, but also on the faculty's positive 
assessment of the student's potential for a 
career in the professional theater. 

This assessment is recorded through a 
process of in-person and written evaluation. 
Students whose grade in core classes (see 
"Academic Progress") is less than C- may 



not be permitted to move on to the next 
level of training in that area. Because the 
curriculum is frequently integrated (i.e., 
what is being taught in speech or dance may 
directly parallel what is being taught in 
acting studio) the student may be prevented 
from moving forward in those disciplines 
as well. 

In all degree programs, both the student 
and the Director's Office will be provided 
with copies of the written summation of the 
student's evaluation. A student who has not 
shown satisfactory improvement may be 
asked to leave the program. 

In the BFA Acting program, in-depth 
evaluations will be conducted in semesters 
two through five. These in-person evalua- 
tions will be held with the student's acting, 
movement, and speech teacher present and 
will focus specifically on the student's work 
and progress through the program. Ideally, 
these sessions should recap the ongoing 
input the student has received throughout 
the term in studio. 

As a follow-up to these sessions, the stu- 
dent will receive a written evaluation 
reviewing the points covered in-person and 
including a statement on the student's status 
in the program (i.e., reinvitation assured, 
contingent upon further improvement, or 
in jeopardy). 

The BFA in Musical Theater employs a 
jury system by which students are evalu- 
ated. Musical Theater jury exams are held at 
the end of semesters one to seven to eval- 
uate students' progress. Each student is 
required to prepare a minimum of five songs 
(three for fu-st-year students) to be presented 
before a panel of Musical Theater faculty. It 
is expected that these songs be fully devel- 
oped musically and dramatically. After 
completion of the jury, the student receives 
a written evaluation from each member of 
the panel. 

Junior musical theater majors must be 
approved at midyear to proceed to advanced 
acting technique. Not being approved for 
such study, however, will not impede the 
student's progress toward graduation. 

Initial evaluations in the BFA for Applied 
Theater Arts are conducted at the conclu- 
sion of the first year and throughout the 
second year. The student will convene with 
her/his advisor and head of program. During 
these first evaluations, the primary issues 
dealt with will be the student's satisfactory 
performance in production lab assignments 
and aptitude in the areas of stage manage- 
ment and dramaturgy. The first evaluation in 
a student's third year will focus on the stu- 
dent's progress and a statement submitted 



114 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



by the student discussing the areas of 
emphasis that have drawn his/her primary 
interest. Evaluators will consider how effec- 
tively the student has demonstrated skills in 
those areas. By the end of the third year, eval- 
uations will focus on the student's declared 
area of emphasis. 



School of Theater Arts Faculty 

BFA Acting Program 

Acting Training 

Irene Baird 
Jennifer Childs 
Johnnie Hobbs, Jr 
David Howey 
Ernest Losso 
Drucie McDaniel 
David Newer 
Mike Pedretti 
Peter Pryor 
Rick Stoppleworth 
Gene Terruso 
Joan Twiss 

Voice/Speech Training 

Neill Hartley 

Connie Koppe - • 

Leigh Smiley-Grace 

D'ArcyWebb 



BFA Applied Theater Arts 
Program* 

Jennifer Childs 

Kali Colton 

Charles Conwell 

Mari Fielder 

Nan Gilbert 

Johnnie Hobbs, Jr. 

Aaron Posner 

Ed Shockley 

Denise Taylor 

Gene Terruso 

Jiri Zizka 

* The BFA program in Applied Theater Arts 

draws instructors from all areas of the School 

of Theater Arts. 

Design and Production Training 

Edward Johnson 
Anna Michelle Oldham 
Troy Martin O'Shia 



IVIovement Training 

Karen Cleighton 

Kali Colton 

Aaron Cromie 

Manfred Fischbeck i 

Nancy Kantra 

Rebecca Lisak 

Tammy Meneghini 

Janice Orlandi 

Dan Rothenberg 

BFA Musical Theater Program 
Performance Training 

Charles Gilbert 
Patricia Raine 
Owen Robbins 
Rick Stoppleworth 
Neal Tracy 

Voice Training 

Eric Ebbenga 

Mary Ellen Grant-Kennedy 

Theresa Greenland 

Forrest McClendon 

Patricia Raine 

Neal Tracy 

Dance Training 

Karen Cleighton 
Rex Henriques 
Nancy Kantra 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



"5 



Acting 

Bachelor of Fine Arts 123 credits 



Applied Theater Arts 

Bachelor of Fine Arts 123 credits 



Freshmen 


Year Credits 


Junior 


Credits 


Freshmen 


Year Credits 


Fall 






Fall 






Fall 






TH103A 


Acting Studio 1 


3.0 


TH 323 


Acting Studio: Technique III 3.0 


TH103A 


Acting Studio 1 


3.0 


TH109A 


Voice and Speech 




TH 103 L 


Crew- 





TH123 


Scene and Lighting Tech. 


2.0 




for Actors I 


2.0 


TH309 


Voice and Speech f 




TH123L 


Scene and Lighting 




TH105A 


Stage Combat 1 


2.0 




or Actors V 


2.0 




Tech. Lab. 


1.0 


TH115A 


Movement for Actors I 


1.0 


TH315A 


Movement for Actors V 


2,0 


TH113 


Encounters with Theater Arts 3.0 


TH 123 


Scene and Lighting Tech. 


2.0 


TH317 


Fundamentals of Directing 


3.0 


TH105A 


Stage Combat I 


2.0 


TH113 


Encounters with Theater Arts 3.0 


HUXXX 


Liberal Arts 


3.0 


HUllOA 


First Year Writing 1 


3.0 


HUllOA 


First Year Writing I 


3.0 




Electives 


3.0 


Fall Total 




14.0 


Fall Total 




16.0 


Fall Total 




16.0 


Spring 






Spring 






Spring 






TH 103 B 


Acting Studio II 


3.0 


TH 103 B 


Acting Studio II 


3.0 


•TH 324 


Acting Smdio: 




TH124 


Costumes and Prop Tech. 


2.0 


TH 103 L 


Crew 







Poetic Realism 


3.0 


TH124L 


Costumes and Prop 




TH 109 B 


Speech for Actors n 


2.0 


TH310 


Voice and Speech 






Tech. Lab. 


1.0 


THXXX 


Movement Elective 


1.0 




for Actors VI 


2.0 


TH213 


Script Analysis 


3.0 


TH124 


Costumes and Prop Tech. 


2.0 


TH 326 


Audition Techniques 


2.0 


THIOI 


Neutral Mask 


1.0 


TH213 


Script Analysis 


3.0 


TH315B 


Movement for Actors VI 


2.0 


HU 1 10 B 


First Year Writing II 


3.0 


HUllOB 


First Year Writing II 


3.0 


TH330 


Acting on Camera ' 


1.0 




Electives 


3.0 


Spring Tota 
Freshman Y 


;ar Total 
re 


14.0 
30.0 


HUXXX 

Spring Tota 


Liberal Arts 
Electives 


3.0 
3.0 
16.0 


Spring Total 
Freshman Year Total 


■16.0 

30.0 


Sophomo 
Fall 


lunior Year Total 


32.0 


Sophomore 














~ Fall 






TH223 


Acting Studio: Technique I 
Crew 


4.0 



Senior Year 




_ TH203A 
TH103L 


Acting Studio III 
Crew- 


3.0 


TH 103 L 


Fall 









TH209A 


Voice and Speech 




TH423 


Acting Studio: Verse Drama 1 4.0 


TH311A 


Theater History I 


3.0 




for Actors III 


2'.0 


TH415A 


Movement for Actors Vn 


2.0 


HUXXX 


Arts Criticism (or equivalent) 3.0 


TH215A 


Movement for Actors III 


2.0 


TH419 


Business of Theater 


1.0 


HU103A 


Intro, to Modernism 1 


3.0 


TH311A 


Theater History I 


3.0 


HUXXX 


Liberal Arts 


6.0 


HUXXX 


Liberal Arts 


3.0 


HU103A 


Intro, to Modernism I 


3.0 


Fall Total 




13.0 


Fall Total 




15.0 


HUXXX 


Liberal Arts 


3.0 


Spring 






Spring 






Fall Total 




17.0 


THXXX 


Studio Electives 


8.0 


TH103L 


Crew 





Spring 








Electives 


3.0 


TH228 


Playwriting 


3.0 


TH224 


Acting Studio: Technique E 


4.0 


HUXXX 


Liberal Arts 


3.0 


TH227 


Fundamentals of 




TH103L 


Crew 





Spring Tota 




14.0 




Stage Management 


3.0 


TH209B 


Voice and Speech 
for Actors IV 
Movement for Actors IV 


2.0 
2.0 


Senior Year Total 


27.0 


- TH351 
TH311B 
HU103B 


Production Practicum 
Theater History II 
Intro, to Modernism II 


1.0 
3.0 


TH215B 








3.0 


TH311B 


Theater History II 


3.0 








HU XXX 


Liberal Arts 


3.0 


HU 103 B 


Intro, to Modernism 11 


3.0 




\ 




Spring Tota 




16.0 


HUXXX 
Spring Tota 


Liberal Arts 
Year Total 


3.0 

17.0 
34.0 


- 






Sophomore 


Year Total 


31.0 


Sophomore 









ii6 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



Musical Theater 

Bachelor of Fine Arts 123 credits 



Junior 


Credits 


Freshmen Year Credits 


Fall 






Fall 




TH351 


Production Practicum 


1.0 


TH103A 


Acting Studio I 3.0 


TH103L 


Crew 





THI4IA 


Voice for Musical Theater I 1 .0 


TH327 


Advanced Stage 




THI41L 


Voice for Musical Thtr. Lab 




Management 


3.0 


TH122A 


Music Skills for 




Electives 


3,0 




Musical Theater I 2.0 


HUXXX 


Liberal Arts 


6.0 


TH142A 


Voice Lesson for Musical Thtr. 1 .0 


HUXXX 


Dramatic Literature Elective 


3.0 


TH150A 


Dance for Musical Theater I 1 .0 


Fall Total 




16.0 


TH 123 


Scene and Lighting Tech. 2.0 


Spring 

TH351 






HUIIOA 


First Year Writing I 3.0 


Production Practicum 


1.0 


THII3 


Encounters with Theater Arts 3.0 


TH430 


Stage to Video Production 


2.0 


Fall Total 


16.0 


TH3I7 


The Fundamentals 




Spring 






of Directing 


3.0 


TH103B 


Acting Studio II 3.0 




Electives 


3.0 


TH103L 


Crew 


HUXXX 


Liberal Arts 


3.0 


TH141B 


Voice for Musical Theater II 1 .0 


HU XXX 


Dramatic Literature Elective 


3.0 


TH141L 


Voice for Musical Thtr Lab 


Spring Tota 




15.0 


TH122B 


Music Skills II 2.0 


Junior Year Total 


31.0 


THI42B 
THI50B 
THI24 
HUllOB 


Voice Lesson for Musical Thtr. 1 .0 
Dance for Musical Theater II 1 .0 


Senior Year 




Costumes and Prop Tech. 2.0 
First Year Writing II 3.0 


TH35I 
TH4I9 


Production Practicum 
Business of Theater 


3.0 
1.0 


TH213 
Spring Tota 


Script Analysis 3.0 
16.0 




Studio Electives 


2.0 


Freshman Year Total 32.0 


HUXXX 


Dramatic Literature Elective 
Liberal Arts 


3.0 
6.0 






HU XXX 


Sophomore 



Junior 



Credits 



Fall Total 15.0 
Spring 

TH460 Production Practicum 3.0 

TH452 Senior Project 3.0 

TH 326 Audition Techniques 2.0 

TH 449 Internship 6.0 
Studio Electives 2.0 

Spring Total 16.0 



Senior Year Total 



31.0 



Fall 

TH 223 Acting Studio: Technique I 4.0 

THI03L Crew 
TH 242 Voice Lesson for Musical Thtr. 1 .0 
TH 209 A Voice and Speech 

for Actors III 2.0 

TH250A Dance for Musical Theater 2.0 

TH222A Music Skills III 2.0 

HUI03A Intro, to Modernism I 3.0 

Fall Total 14.0 
Spring 

TH224 Acting Studio: Technique II 4.0 

TH103L Crew 
TH 242 Voice Lesson for Musical Thtr. 1 .0 
TH 209 B Voice and Speech 

for Actors IV 2.0 

TH 250 B Dance for Musical Theater 2.0 
TH 222 B Music Skills for 

Musical Thtr. IV 2.0 

TH241 Found, of Singing Acting 2.0 

HU 103 B Intro, to Modernism II 3.0 

Spring Total 16.0 



Fall 

TH323 

THI03L 

TH3I5A 

TH3I8A 

TH34IA 

TH 342 A 

TH350A 

TH312A 

HUXXX 

Fall Total 

Spring 

TH318B 

TH341B 

TH 342 B 

TH 350 B 

THXXX 

TH312B 

HUXXX 

Spring Total 



Acting Studio: Technique III 3.0 
Crew 

Movement for Actors V 2.0 

Musical Theater Repertory 2.0 
Voice for Musical Theater 1 .0 
Voice Lesson for Musical Thtr. 1 .0 



Dance for Musical Theater 
Musical Theater History I 
Liberal Arts 



I.O 
3.0 
3.0 
16.0 



Musical Theater Repertory 
Voice for Musical Theater 
Voice Lesson for Musical Thtr. 
Dance for Musical Theater 
Theater Studio Electives 
Musical Theater History II 
Liberal Arts 



Junior Year Total 



33.0 



Senior Year 



Fall 

TH 441 A/B Voice for Musical Theater: 

Cabaret 1.0, 
TH 442 A/B Voice Lesson for Musical Thtr. 1 .0 

THXXX Movement Elective 1.0 

HUXXX Liberal Arts 6.0 

Electives 4.0 

Fall Total 15,0 
Spring 
TH 441 A/B Voice for Musical Theater: 

Cabaret 1,0 
TH 442 A/B Voice Lesson for Musical Thlr. 1 ,0 

THXXX Movement Elective 1,0 

TH4I9 Business of Theater 1,0 

HU XXX Liberal Arts 6,0 

Electives 4,0 

Spring Total 16,0 

Senior Year Total 31,0 



Sophomore Year Total 



30,0 



Tlie University of ttie Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



117 




Undergraduate and Graduate 
Course Catalog 
2003 • 2004 



S/) 







The University * 

OF THE Arts® ' 



College of Media and 
Communication 



Neil Kleinman 

nkleinman@uarts.edu • 

Dean 

215-717-6590 

Barbara Spodobalski 

bspodobalski @ uarts.edu 
Assistant to the Dean 
215-717-6024 

The College of Media and Communication has approval of the 
Commonwealth of Pennsylvania to grant Bachelor of Fine Arts and 
Bachelor of Science degrees as part of The University of the Arts. 

The newest of The University's three colleges, the College of 
Media and Communication provides a crossroads for students inter- 
ested in performing and visual arts, writing and narrative, new 
media, new technology, and interactivity. In small classes, students 
take advantage of an extremely close and supportive atmosphere, and 
the opportunity to shape an education that is highly individualized 
and able to reflect their goals and interests. 



Programs of Study 



The College of Media and Communication is dedicated to the inte- 
gration of art, technology, and communication. In recognition of the 
new artistic opportunities that have recently emerged and of the 
importance of technology in many areas of communication, pro- 
grams in the College of Media and Communication are characterized 
by their reliance on text, their use of appropriate technologies, and 
their commitment to collaboration and other strategies that take 
advantage of individual expertise and vision placed in a cooperative 
setting. 

A distinctive aspect of the programs in the College is their multi- 
disciplinary nature. Specialized courses that are unique and essential 
to the field are augmented by major courses drawn from various pro- 
grams throughout the University, and students are encouraged to 
explore The University's vast artistic and academic offerings through 
electives and minor courses of study. 

The programs offered in the College are: 

• BS in Communication 

• BFA in Multimedia 

• BFA in Writing for Film and Television 

Each program is designed as a rigorous sequential course of study, 
balancing major requirements with electives and a 42-credit liberal 
arts core. As a result, each program promotes an education that is 
broad and deep, as well as being practical and richly theoretical. 
Students graduate knowing both how to make ideas using a diverse 
set of media while also learning to think about what they are making 
and why. 

To extend their education. CMAC students may also develop spe- 
cialized competencies by taking minors in a number of new areas: 

• Documentary Video 

• E-Music 

• E-Publishing 

•Game Design "i . 

• Information Architecture 

• Multimedia . 

• Narrative Video _ ■ . "' 

• Screenwriting 

• Strategic Advertising 

• Web Design • ■ . . 

• Web Drama 

These minors have been designed to complement the College's 
majors, and have been developed with an eye both to new forms of 
creative expression and the new careers that have emerged as a result 
of the Internet and the growth of new media. 

Special Facilities & Resources 

The College of Media and Communication is housed in the 
recently renovated Terra Building where students and faculty have 
access to excellent facilities and equipment. 

Production Studio 

The College houses a multi-functional production studio available 
for use by students in the College's video, audio, advertising, and 
journalism classes. The studio offers students a flexibly designed 
space in which to produce documentary television features, educa- 
tional video and films, news features, corporate media, and television 
commercials. Associated with it is a sound studio that also serves as 
the center for the Communication Department's Web radio and 
Webzine. 



The University of the Ans Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



Digital Labs and Editing Rooms 

Students in Communication use a digital lab with a range of state- 
of-the-art audio and video systems, pre- and post-production equip- 
ment. PC. Mac. and Unix systems, and a complete spectrum of audio, 
video, and Web software used to create films, videos, advertising 
campaigns, and Web dramas. In addition, there is a logging and dub- 
bing studio, as well as several private editing suites available to 
students who need a quiet place and long blocks of uninterrupted 
time to edit their work. 

Multimedia Studios and Labs 

The College's multimedia studios provide students with the most 
advanced multimedia equipment in the region. The cross-platform 
production environment spans Macintosh. PC, and Unix-based oper- 
ating systems. A MAVIO station (Mobile Audio-Visual Input/Output) 
allows users to input analog and digital information and to output 
digital and analog information as well. These smdios are equipped 
with industry-standard software from which students can create illus- 
trations, scan images, record sounds, digitize video, and create 
CD-ROMs. Students in the Multimedia Program use these labs to 
work on video games, animations, Web nartatives, interactive 
Websites, and digital videos. 

MIDI Studio 

The College features a MIDI Studio (Musical Instrument Digital 
Interface), which is used by students in multimedia and e-music to 
create electronic and experimental music for documentary and narra- 
tive film and video, Web drama, and games. 

Equipment Room 

The College's Equipment Room offers CMAC students the oppor- 
tunity to bortow the most current portable video, audio, and 
photographic equipment for off-campus production. The equipment 
includes digital video and still cameras, DAT and Minidisk audio 
recorders, Lowell location lighdng kits, and an array of microphones, 
field monitors, and accessories. 

Galleries 

There are a number of galleries and display areas throughout the 
College that are highly flexible, equipped with professional lighting. 
and supported by multimedia equipment for the display of work in all 
media. There are periodic shows of student documentaries, final proj- 
ects and works-in-progress developed by students as part of their 
classes or independent study, as well as shows of work by faculty and 
distinguished outsiders. 

Special Resources 

To provide its students with experience in publishing new media, 
the College sponsors a student-run Webzine, a Web radio, hosts a 
number of student- and alumni-produced Websites, and supports stu- 
dent-developed videos, games, and interactive projects. 



New Media Center 
Chris Garvin 

Director 

The University of the Arts is proud to be a member of the New 
Media Centers, a group of the nation's leading academic institutions 
and technology corporations dedicated to the advancement of tech- 
nology in education. The University of the Arts is one of the few art 
schools worldwide to be welcomed into this organization, whose 
members include New York University, Cornell, MIT, and UCLA. 

The University of the Arts" New Media Center (NMC) is a state- 
of-the-art digital laboratory that provides Internet access and permits 
the integration of text, graphics, imagery, animation, music, and 
sound. While the entire University community uses these labs, the 
NMC is the primary classroom for students in the College's 
Multimedia Program. 

CMAC Minors 

The College of Media and Communication offers minors that 
enable a student to focus on a specific discipline through organized 
electives. All of the CMAC minors have been designed to comple- 
ment the majors students take and are intended to add skills and 
experience that enrich the major as well as strengthen the capabilities 
of students in a variety of fields upon graduating from the University. 
A minor advisor will be assigned by the student's major program 
director, except in the case of Information Architecture and Web 
Design minors. Students interested in those minors will be advised by 
the Director of the Multimedia department. 

Students wishing to include a minor are governed by the following 
guidelines: 

1. Except as indicated. CMAC minors are only available to stu- 
dents majoring in degree programs offered by the College of Media 
and Communication. 

2. A student may not take a major and a minor in the same subject. 

3. Courses applied to the minor may not be used for the major, but 
they may be used as elective credits. 

4. All minors require a minimum of 15 credits, which are defined 
by the department; generally, no substitution is allowed. 

5. Students must declare their intent to complete a minor by com- 
pleting the Minor Declaration Form available in the Office of the 
Registrar. Both the student's major and minor advisors must sign this 
fonn. 

6. A student pursuing a minor may be required to complete more 
than the minimum number of credits required for graduation. 

7. Minors are available only to undergraduate students. 

8. Students wishing to pursue a minor must meet eligibility 
requirements, which may include a satisfactory grade-point average, 
prerequisites, and departmental portfolio review. 

9. The minor advisor must approve all courses taken as part of a 
minor. 



The University of tiie Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



Documentary Video Minor 

The minor in documentary video provides instruction in the 
making of creative non-fiction stories, essays and informational pro- 
grams, primarily in video form. It is designed for students who wish 
to augment their studies in a related field. Through this minor, stu- 
dents learn to document the lives and narratives of people and places, 
portray historical, political and contemporary events, present infor- 
mation in accessible and stimulating forms, and make persuasive 
arguments, as well as to learn the skills related to documentary pro- 
duction. Communication majors may not declare a Documentary 
Video minor 



E-Publisliing Minor 

The minor in e-publishing provides students with skills connected to 
both the craft and business of writing and publishing online. This minor 
provides students with an opportunity to strengthen their journalistic 
and expository writing styles especially as used in electronic media, 
while also learning the basics of the business of estabhshing a Website, 
Webzine, Web radio, or Weblog. The skills learned are useful for stu- 
dents who are interested in online publishing as an independent 
publisher or freelance writer, as well as those who wish to work with 
online publishing enterprises. Majors in Communication may not 
declare an E-Publishing minor. 



CM 293 


History of Documentary 


3.0 credits 


CM 391 


Documentary Production I 


3.0 


CM 392 


Documentary Production II 


3.0 




Elective* 


3.0 


One of the following: 




CM 120 


Sound Communication 


3.0 


PF 320 


Film Sound 


3.0 



*To be determined with minor advisor. 

E-Music Minor 

The minor in e-music offers students majoring in both Multimedia 
and Music an opportunity to create electronic and experimental 
music, to develop skills that allow them to produce, package, and dis- 
tribute music by taking advantage of digital technology, and to design 
electronic instrumental interfaces. The minor prepares students for a 
variety of highly entrepreneurial careers ranging from entertainment 
and product development to creative and production work in the 
recording and musical fields. This minor is only available to students 
majoring in Multimedia or Music. Please note that this minor reqi- 
ures 17 credits for Music majors. 

MU306 History of Rock & 

Experimental Music 3.0 credits 

MU4i3A Recording 2.0 

MM 370 E-Music Thesis Project 3.0 

, For Multimedia Majors 

MU 1 1 1 A/B Composition/Non-Majors 2.0 

MM 440 Innovative Interfaces 3.0 

MU130A/B Piano for Non-Majors (1/1) 2.0 

For Music Majors 

MM 110 Visual Concepts I 3.0 

MM 121 Introduction to 

Interface Design 3.0 

One of the following: 

MM 221 Interactive Studio I 3.0 

MM 222 Interactive Studio II 3.0 



CM 381 


Digital Journalism I 


3.0 


HU272 


Money Matters: 






Applied Economics 


3.0 


CM 340 


E-Publishing Thesis Project 


3.0 




Elective** 


3.0 


One of the following: 




MM 221 


Interactive Studio I* 


3.0 


MM 340 


Interactive Programming 


3.0 



*Not applicable as minor credit for Multimedia majors. . 
**To be determined with minor advisor. 

Game Design Minor 

The minor in game design explores the principles that inform 
games - how they work, how to make them, why they are important, 
and how they help us understand our worid and social interactions. 
Students learn to construct logical narratives and rules that make pos- 
sible the creation of an active .space in which gaming can take place. 
Using skills based upon interface and experience design, students 
program, write, and design interactive games. Upon completing the 
minor, students will have completed a fully functional prototype of 
an original same. 



MM 240 


Writing for Games 


3.0 credits 


MM 342 


Game Play 


3.0 


MM 344 


Game Design Thesis 


3.0 




Elective ** 


3.0 


One of the following: 




MM 221 


Interactive Studio I *"•" 


3.0 


MM 222 


Interactive Studio II * 


3.0 



MM 341 



Programming for Games 



3.0 



*Not applicable as minor credit for Multimedia majors. 
■^Not applicable as minor credit for Communication majors. 
**To be determined with minor advisor, must be fulfilled 
with MM 121 for Writing for Film and Television majors. 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



Information Architecture Minor 

The minor in information arciiitecture shows students how 
designed information creates meaning. Students develop an under- 
standing of user woricflow, information design, and interactivity. 
They learn to create easy-to-use interfaces and information spaces. 
The program has been created for students interested in developing 
web sites and CD-ROMs, as well as other vehicles whose purpose is 
to deliver information clearly and efficiently. This minor is available 
to students majoring in any program in the University except 
Multimedia. A portfolio review and interview are required before a 
student is accepted into the minor. 



MM 121 


Introduction to 






Interface Design 


3.0 credits 


MM 130 


Information Concepts 


3.0 


MM 221 


Interactive Studio I 


3.0 


MM 222 


Interactive Studio II 


3.0 


MM 320 


Advanced Interface Seminar 


3.0 



Multimedia Minor 

The minor emphasizes the development of multimedia as an art 
form, where students work in-depth to develop media-rich, multi-sen- 
sorial, interactive experiences. The minor provides skills, concepts, 
and tools for students interested in multimedia as a creative and 
expressive art form. This minor is available to students majoring in 
any program in the University except Multimedia. 



MU149 
MM 219 
MM 310 
MM 311 



Aural Concepts 
Intro, to Multimedia 
Multimedia Studio I 
Multimedia Studio II 



One of the following: 
MM 1 1 1 Visual Concepts 

EM 110 Computer Concepts 

MM 23 1 Digital Storytelling 



3.0 credits 
3.0 
3.0 
3.0 

3.0 
3.0 
3.0 



Narrative Video Minor 

The minor in Narrative Video explores digital video as a medium 
for storytelling. It introduces students to various aspects of video pro- 
duction, including scriptwriting, storyboarding, editing, sound 
design, directing, and producing. Students develop their skills as they 
advance from scene exercises through a short film to a final year-long 
project. This minor is open to all UArts majors, except those in 
Film/Digital Video. 

One of the followina: 



WM219 


Writing for Film* 


3.0 


CM 295 


Narrative Video 






Production Workshop 


3.0 


PF410A 


Senior Cinema Production I 


3.0 


PF410B 


Senior Cinema Production II 


3.0 


One of the following: 




CM 120 


Sound Communication** 


3.0 


PF320 


Sync-Sound for 






Narrative Film** 


3.0 



*Not applicable as minor credit for Writing for Film and 
Television majors. A production, film studies, or Liberal Arts film- 
related elective is taken instead, and is to be determined with minor 
adviser. 

**Not applicable as minor credit for Communication majors. A 
production, film studies, or Liberal Arts film-related elective is taken 
instead, and is to be determined with minor adviser. 

Recommended electives for Communication and Writing for Film 
and Television majors include: CM 391 Documentary Media 
Production I; PF 423 Professional Practices in FilniA'ideo; PF 424 
Time: A Multidisciplinary Seminar: WM 215 Screenwriting II; WM 
225 Interactive Writing; WM 24 1 Arts of the Media: WM 243 Acting 
and Directing for Writers. 

Screenwriting Minor 

The minor in screenwriting provides instruction and applied expe- 
rience in the craft of scriptwriting for motion pictures and episodic 
television. Topics include story structure, character, plot, beats, dra- 
matic conflict, dialogue, and industry script formats. Students 
advance from scene exercises through short scripts to major, profes- 
sional-length portfolio pieces. Majors in Writing for Film & 
Television may not declare a screenwriting minor. 



WM 2 1 5 Screenwriting II 

WM219 Writing for Fdm 

WM 243 Screenplay Analysis 
One of the following sequences: 

WM 321 Adv. Screenwriting I 

WM 322 Adv. Screenwnting II 
or 

WM317 Epi.sodic TV Writing I 

WM318 Episodic TV Writing n 



3.0 credits 

3.0 

3.0 

3.0 
3.0 

3.0 
3.0 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



123 



strategic Advertising Minor 

The minor in advertising strategy provides instruction in strategic 
thinldng and creative execution required to design advertisements and 
ad campaigns in multiple formats (print, audio, video, and interactive). 
This minor offers tools and concepts to students interested in marketing 
and promoting any product, service, or artistic activity. It broadens the 
career options of students in any of the media and communication disci- 
plines, and prepares them to work in both the profit and not-for-profit 
sectors of the media and communication industries. Communication 
majors may not declare a strategic advertising minor 



Web Drama Minor 

The minor in web drama allows students to learn and apply dra- 
matic storytelling techniques to the web. It focuses on the 
fundamentals of scriptwriting and interactivity, the acquisition of 
basic video and animation techniques, and the overall adaptation of 
these elements to the Internet. The minor allows students to combine 
the principles necessary to write for television, film, or video with 
those of interactivity required for web production. Upon completion 
of this minor, students will have written and produced a dramatic 
story that is suitable for web distribution. 



CM 27 1 Creative Concepts I 

CM 37 1 Advertising Strategy 

CM 372 Creative Concepts II 

Elective*** 
One of the following: 
CM 211 Writing for Media* 

CM 373 Introduction to 

Public Relations** 



3.0 credits 
3.0 
3.0 
3.0 

3.0 

3.0 



Not applicable as minor credit for Multimedia majors. 
*Required for Multimedia majors. 
**To be determined with minor advisor. 



Web Design Minor 

The minor in web design provides skills, concepts and tools for 
students interested in web design as a creative medium of expression, 
as a form of communication or as a profession. The skills learned 
enhance the preparedness of students wishing to enter the design, 
communication and media industries. Fine artists interested in the 
role that Internet-based technologies and interactivity play in their 
work will also find this minor to be broadening. Multimedia majors 
may not declare a web design minor 



WM 225 


Interactive Writing I 


3.0 credits 


WM226 


Interactive Writing II 


3.0 


MM 330 


Web Drama Studio 


3.0 


One of the following: 




WM219 


Writing for Film* 


3.0 


MM 221 


Interactive Studio I** 


3.0 


One of the following: 




CM 120 


Sound Communication*** 


3.0 


CM 290 


Video Production 






Workshop**** 


3.0 


MM 233 


Interactive Narrative***** 


3.0 



*Not applicable as nninor credit for Writing for Film and 
Television majors. Required for Communication and Multimedia 
majors. 

**Applicable as minor credit only for Writing for Film and 
Television Students. 

***Not applicable as minor credit for Communication majors. 

****Not applicable as minor credit for Writing for Film and 
Television majors. 

*****Not applicable as minor credit for Multimedia majors. 



MM 121 Introduction to 

Interface Design 
MM 3 1 1 Multimedia Studio II 

One of the following: 
MM 110 Visual Concepts I# 
MM 1 1 1 Visual Concepts II* 

Two of the following: 
MM 22 1 Interactive Studio I**-i- 

MM 222 Interactive Studio ll*+ 



MM 3320 



3.0 
3.0 

3.0 
3.0 

3.0 
3.0 
Advanced Interface Seminar 3.0 



■ *Required for Communication majors. 
**Not applicable as minor credit for Communication majors 
-I- Required for Writing for Film and Television majors 



124 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



College of Media and 
Communication Faculty 

Susan Barry 

Senior Lecturer 

BFA, Nova Scotia School of Art 

and Design 
MA, University of Sussex 

David Brown 

Assistant Professor 
BS, Duquesne University 
MTS, Eastern Baptist Theological 
Seminary 

Tsla Carson 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 

BFA, Nova Scotia School of Art & Design 

MFA. The Ohio State University 

Geoff DiMasi 

Assistant Professor 

BA, Rutgers University 

MFA, The University of the Arts 

Barry Dornfeld 

Director, Comimniication 

Associate Professor 

BA, Tufts University 

MA. PhD, University of Pennsylvania 

De Angela Duff 

Assistant Professor 

BFA, Georgia State University 

BS, Georgia Institute of Technology 

Mark Ellis 

Master Lecturer 

BA, Pennsylvania State University 

Louis Fuiano 

Senior Lecturer 

BA, Tyler School of Art. Temple University 

Chris Garvin 

Director, Multimedia 

Assistant Professor 

BFA, State University of New York 

at Buffalo 
MFA, The Ohio State University 

Randi Glatzer 

Senior Lecturer 

BS, State University of New York 
at Binghamton 

JoAnn Greco 

Senior Lecturer 

BA, New York University 



Dave Hartl 

Assistant Professor 

BM, West Chester University 

Susan jacobson 

Adjimct Assistant Professor 
BS, University of Florida 
MPS, New York University 

Ron Kanter 

Master Lecturer 

BS, Temple University 

MFA, University of Pennsylvania 

Nicole Marie Keating 

Assistant Professor 

BA, McGill University 

MA. PhD, University of Pennsylvania 

K. Lynne Koval-Bauer 

Assistant Professor 

BA, University of Texas at Austin 

BA, University of Akron 

Sharon Lefevre 

Assistant Professor 

BA, Princeton University 

MA, MPhil, Columbia University 

Larry Loebell 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 
BA, MFA. Temple University 
MA, Colorado State University 

Slavko Milekic 

Associate Professor 

MSc, MD, Belgrade University, Yugoslavia 

PhD, University of Connecticut 

JackMurnighan 

Assistant Professor 
BA, Brown University 
MA, PhD, Duke University 

CamilleA. Paglia 

University Professor 

BA, State University of New York 

at Binghamton 
MPhil, PhD. Yale University 

Theta Pavis 

Senior Lecturer 

BA, University of California 

at Los Angeles 
MS, Columbia University 

Graduate School of Journalism 

John J. H.Phillips 

Senior Lecturer 



Jeff Ryder 

Director. Writing for Film and Television 
Associate Professor 
BA. Rider College 

Steven Saylor 

Assistant Professor 

BA, Franklin and Marshall College 

MA, MFA, Temple University 

Art Stiefel 

Senior Lecturer 

BFA, The School of Visual Arts 

MarkViggiano 

Senior Lecturer 

BS, Saint Joseph's University 

MA. Rowan University 

Diane Walsh 

Associate Professor 

BA. San Jose State University 

Michael Wellenreiter 

Senior Lecturer 

BS, University of Wisconsin, Madison 

MFA, Temple University 

Jeffrey Wolper 

Adjunct Associate Professor 

BA. LaSalle University 

MS, PhD, University of Pennsylvania 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



125 



Communication 



Barry Domfeld 

bdornfeld@uarts.edu 

Director 

215-717-6470 

Media makers occupy a place of great 
influence and importance in our increasingly 
mediated world. This studio-based 
Communication program is designed to 
reflect the changing nature of the media 
industries due to new technologies, demo- 
graphic diversity, and the increase in global 
flows of ideas, images, and products. Upon 
their graduation, we expect our students to be 
able to work in a variety of media forms, to 
be broadly knowledgeable about the media 
industry, and able to think critically about 
media making and the media's impact on cul- 
ture and society. 

Students learn how to create work in one 
or more of three principal concentrations: 
documentary production, digital journalism, 
and advertising using the digital tools of the 
trade. While developing professional skills in 
these areas, they are exposed to theory in 
communication and media studies, grounding 
their production work in an understanding of 
how to think about media and its place in 
contemporary culture. Students learn about 
the connections between aesthetic 
approaches and communicated meaning, 
about the history of communication, and 
about cultural context and organizational 
constraints, and grapple with the ethical con- 
siderations that arise in professional practice. 

Throughout their undergraduate training, 
students take a range of courses in the liberal 
arts and choose electives throughout the 
University. Students" production work builds 
on this intellectual base, beginning with exer- 
cises and growing to intensive projects in the 
selected area of concentration. The program 
stresses digital media production across plat- 
forms and promotes an understanding of 
what these new tools make possible and what 
they limit. 



Freshmen take courses that offer both an 
historical and a social perspective to commu- 
nication, while they learn visual and sound 
fundamentals through introductory studio 
courses. They are introduced to field-based 
imaging equipment and post-production stu- 
dios, and begin to produce and critique their 
own work. 

The year-long Media Forms and Contexts 
course in the sophomore year acts as a key- 
stone to the basic Communication curriculum 
and intensive screening of mainstream and 
alternative media forms. The course gives 
students experience in producing in a broad 
range of media genres. The Interactive Studio 
and Writing for Media courses round out this 
year. 

In the junior year, students work more 
intensively in each of the program concentra- 
tions - Documentary Production, Digital 
Journalism, and Advertising. Media 
Industries and Communication Theory and 
Culture in the 20th Century deepen students' 
understanding of the changing landscape of 
media industries and their cultural impact. 

For their senior year, students choose one 
of the three concentrations as the focus of 
their studio work, taking a year-long team- 
based studio course. Through this intensive 
training, students develop a portfolio of 
media work, pulling together their previous 
experiences and interests into a project that 
can represent their abilities to the profes- 
sional worid. Additional courses, including 
two internships, prepare students for profes- 
sional life beyond the University. 

In addition to the major, students may 
minor in a five-course sequence designed to 
augment of their major. Students in 
Communication are particularly interested in 
minoring in digital filmmaking, e-publishing. 
screenwriting, or web drama. The 
Department also offers minors in documen- 
tary video and strategic advertising, which 
are available to students in the other majors 
by the College. 



Communication 
Core Curriculum 

The core cumculum is common to all majors in the 
Communication program. These required courses 
develop a solid foundation from which students 
pursue their choice of concentration. Students for- 
mally select their concentration during the advising 
period in the fall of the junior year. 



Freshman 


Year Credits 


Fall 






CM 120 


Sound Communication 


3.0 


CM 250* 


History of Communication 


3.0 


MM 110 


Visual Concepts I 


3.0 


HUllOA 


First Year Writing I 


3.0 


HU 103 A 


Intro, to Modernism I 


3.0 


Fall Total 




15.0 


Spring 






CM 290 


Video Production Workshop 


3.0 


MM 130 


Information Concepts 


3.0 




Electives 


3.0 


HUllOB 


First Year Writing 11 


3.0 


HU 103B 


Intro, to Modernism II 


3.0 


Spring Tota 




15.0 


Freshman Year Total: 


30.0 


Sophomore Year 


Fall 






CM 201 


Media Forms and Contexts 


4.5 


CM 211 


Writing for Media 


3.0 


PF220 


Intro, to Documentary 






Photography 


3.0 




Electives 


3.0 


HU XXX 


Liberal Arts 


3.0 


Fall Total 




16.5 


Spring 






CM 202 


Media Forms and Contexts II 4.5 


CM 271 


Advertising: 






Creative Concepts I 


3.0 


MM 221 


Interactive Studio I 


3.0 




Electives 


3.0 


HU272 


Money Matters 


3.0 


Spring Tota 




16.5 


Sophomore 


Year Total: 


33.0 



" Indicates discipline history requirement. 



126 



The University of tlie Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



Advertising Concentration 

123 credits 

Students learn to work in the creative sectors of the 
advertising industry by combining creative skills, 
strategic thinking, and the use of multiple media. 



Digital Journalism 
Concentration 123 credits 

Students learn to combine research, reporting, 
writing, editorial, and interactive design skills by 
developing news-based material for online publica- 
tions. 



Documentary Production 
Concentration 123 credits 

Students learn to use video and audio technologies to 
capture real-world stories in moving images. Courses 
emphasize technique, project management, and 
moving from concept through research to execution 



Junior Year Credits 








of documentary projects. 




Fall 


Advertising Strategy 
Development 
Digital Journalism 1 
Documentary Media Prod. 1 
Media Industries 
Liberal Arts 


3.0 
3.0 
3.0 
3.0 
3.0 


Junior Year Credits 




CM 371 


Fall 

CM 381 
CM 391 
CM 260 * 

HUXXX 


Digital Journalism I 
Documentary Media Prod. 1 
Media Industries 
Electives 
Liberal Arts 


3.0 
3.0 
3.0 
3.0 
3.0 


JuniorYear Credits 


CM 381 
CM 391 
CM 260 * 
HUXXX 


Fall 

CM 381 
CM 391 
CM 260 * 


DigitalJoumalism 1 3,0 
Documentary Media Prod. 1 3.0 
Media Industries 3.0 
Electives 3.0 


Fall Total 




15.0 


Fall Total 




15.0 


HU XXX 


Liberal Arts 


3.0 


Spring 

CM 372 
CM 373 
CM 251* 


Adv: Creative Concepts 11 
Intro, to Public Relations 
Communication 
Theories and Culture 


3.0 
3.0 

3.0 


Spring 

CM 382 
CM 383 

CM 251* 


Digital Journalism 11 
News and Culture 
in the Digital Age 
Communication 


3.0 
3.0 


Fall Total 
Spring 

CM 392 
CM 393 
CM 251* 


Documentary Media Prod. 
History of Documentary 
Communication 


15.0 

II 3.0 

3.0 


HUXXX 


Electives 
Liberal Arts 


3.0 
3.0 




Theories and Culture 
Electives 


3.0 
3.0 




Theories and Culture 
Electives 


3.0 
3.0 


Spring Tota 




15.0 


HUXXX 


Liberal Arts 


3.0 


HU XXX 


Liberal Arts 


3.0 


Junior Year Total: 


30.0 


Spring Tota 




15.0 


Spring Total 




15.0 


Senior Year 




Junior Year 


Total: 


30,0 


JuniorYear total: 


30,0 


Fall 


Senior Studio I 


4.5 


Senior Year 




Senior Year 




CM 461 


Fall 






Fall 






CM 499 


Internship 


1.5 


CM 461 


Senior Studio I 


4.5 


CM 461 


Senior Studio I 


4.5 


HUXXX 


Electives 
Liberal Arts 


3.0 
6.0 


CM 499 


Internship 
Electives 


1.5 
3.0 


CM 499 


Internship 
Electives 


1.5 
3.0 


Fall Total 




15.0 


HUXXX 


Liberal Arts 


6.0 


HUXXX 


Liberal Arts 


6,0 


Spring 






Fall Total 




15.0 


Fall Total 




15.0 


CM 462 
CM 435 


Senior Studio II 
Current Issues in Comm. 


4.5 
3.0 


Spring 

CM 462 


Senior Studio II 


4.5 


Spring 

CM 462 


Senior Studio II 


4.5 


CM 499 


Internship 


1.5 


CM 435 


Current Issues in Comm. 


3.0 


CM 435 


Current Issues in Comm. 


3.0 


HU XXX 


Electives 
Liberal Arts 


3.0 
3.0 


CM 499 


Internship 
Electives 


1.5 
3.0 


CM 499 


Internship 
Electives 


1.5 
3.0 


Spring Tota 




15.0 


HUXXX 


Liberal Arts 


3.0 


HUXXX 


Liberal Arts 


3.0 


Senior Year Total: 


30.0 


Spring Tota 




15.0 


Spring Total 




15.0 








Senior Year lotal: 


30.0 


Senior Year lotal: 


30.0 



''' Indicales discipline history requirement. 



* Indicates discipline history requirement. 



The University of ttie Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



127 



Multimedia 



Chris Garvin 

cgarvin@uarts.edu 
Director 

215-717-6322 

The comprehensive nature of its academic 
programs makes The University of the Arts 
an ideal setting for an education in the 
emerging fields of multimedia. Our goal is to 
develop the cultural producers of the next 
millennium-not merely participants, but the 
avant-garde of the many industries affected 
by the advent of our knowledge-based 
economy. Internet, communications, pub- 
lishing, software, and entertainment, in 
addition to the tine arts, are the most notable 
of the industries ready to incorporate multi- 
media into their core endeavors. 

The major in multimedia at The University 
of the Arts focuses on the integration of 
image, sound, text, and interactivity into 
communicative works, whether they be for 
commercial or fine arts audiences. In our 
holistic approach to the creation of these 
works, we stress craftsmanship, collabora- 
tion, seamless integration of diverse media, 
and artistic excellence. Working with today's 
technology, students create a variety of multi- 
media works in a collaborative studio 
environment, while they develop a concep- 
tual and social perspective on the work they 
and others create. 

The curriculum consists of a four-year 
studio sequence accompanied by a corre- 
sponding intellectual sequence that includes 
a generous amount of liberal arts and elective 
courses. Freshmen are introduced to the basic 
aesthetic and technical issues essential to 
multimedia; these are approached visually, 
aurally, and textually. Students develop an 
understanding of the history and evolution of 
multimedia: the ability to work collabora- 
tively; basic design skills; facility in the use 
of digital tools; sensitivity to general commu- 
nication concepts; and an understanding of 
the principles of music and of information 
management for multimedia design. 



As a means of expanding their under- 
standing of the arts, developing a sensitivity 
to the traditional media, and beginning or 
advancing a skill in a particular art discipline 
that they can bring to their collaborative proj- 
ects, freshmen select an elective course from 
any department in the University. 
Presentarion of a portfolio and/or audition 
and permission of the instructor may be 
required for entry to these classes. 

Built on the foundation of the first year, 
the sophomore curriculum addresses in 
greater depth components of mulUmedia 
such as the moving image, writing and con- 
tent, and interactivity. A discipline history 
course reviews the development of multi- 
media and analyzes its historical influences. 
Multimedia students are encouraged to 
develop a secondary concentration in another 
art form as a specialty within multimedia. 
The electives fulfill that function as well as 
encourage a diversity of interests among the 
multimedia students. 

Students in their junior year refine their 
craft with advanced work in multimedia that 
focuses on completion, presentation, and col- 
laboration in a project-based environment. 
Thus they are prepared both conceptually and 
technically for the integrated work required 
in the senior year. 

The senior-year curriculum enables stu- 
dents to synthesize the concepts and 
techniques learned during the first three years 
while preparing them for entry into the pro- 
fession. In the Senior Studio, full-length 
projects with self-directed themes allow stu- 
dents to explore the art of multimedia and its 
potential for personal expression and com- 
munication. In the Business Seminar and the 
Special Projects courses, multimedia profes- 
sionals address professional practice, 
essential business skills, and current industry 
issues in order to prepare graduates to pursue 
satisfying careers in multimedia. 

Students in Multimedia may also take five- 
course minors, several of which have been 
designed specifically to complement their 
major Of particular interest for students in 
Multimedia are minors in e-music, game 
design, and digital filmmaking. The 
Department also offers minors in information 
architecture, e-publishing, multimedia, and 
web design, which are available to students 
majoring in programs throughout the 
College. 



128 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



Multimedia 

Bachelor of Fine Arts 123 credits 



Freshman 


Year Credits 


Junior Year 


Credits 


Fall 


Fall 






MM 110 


Visual Concepts I 


3.0 


MM 310 


Multimedia Studio I 


3.0 


MM 130 


Information Concepts 


3.0 


MM 320 


Advanced Interface Seminar 3.0 


MU149A 


Aural Concepts I 


3.0 




Electives 


3.0 


HU103A 


Intro, to Modernism I 


3.0 


HUXXX 


Liberal Arts 


6.0 


HUllOA 


First Year Writing I 


3.0 


Fall Total 




15.0 


Fall Total 




15.0 


Spring 






Spring 






MM 311 


Multimedia Studio 11 


3.0 


MMlll 


Visual Concepts II 


3.0 


MM 350 


Business Seminar 


2.0 


MM 121 


Intro, to Interface Design 


3.0 




Eleedves 


3.0 


MU 149 B 


Aural Concepts II 


3.0 


HUXXX 


Liberal Arts 


6.0 




Electives 


2.0 


Spring Total 




14.0 


HU103B 
HUllOB 


Intro, to Modernism II 
First Year Writing II 

;ar Total: 


3.0 
3.0 
17.0 
32.0 


Junior Year Total: 


29.0 


Spring Tola 


Senior Year 




Freshman Y 


Fall 












— MM 410 


Senior Studio I 


4.0 


Sophomore Year 




MM 472 


Special Projects in 




Fall 








Multimedia 


3.0 


MM 221 


Interactive Studio I 


3.0 




Electives 


3.0 


MM 271* 


Survey of Multimedia 


3.0 


HUXXX 


Liberal Arts 


6.0 


MM 223 


Interactive Narratixe 


3.0 


Fall Total 




16.0 


HUXXX 


Electives 
Liberal Arts 


3.0 
3.0 


Spring 

MM 411 


Senior Studio II 


4.0 


Fall Total 




15.0 




Electives 


6.0 


Spring 






HUXXX 


Liberal Arts 


3.0 


MM 150 


Collab. and Spontaneity Sem. 3.0 


Spring Total 




13,0 


PF332 
CM 211 


Video and Animation Tech. 
Writing for Media 
Interactive Studio II 


3.0 
3.0 
3.0 


Senior Year Total: 


29.0 


MM 222 










Electives 


3.0 


* Fulfills three credits of the discipline history 


HUXXX 


Liberal Arts 


3.0 


requirement 






Spring Total 




18.0 








Sophomore 


Year Total: 


33.0 









The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



129 



Writing for Film 
and Television 



Jeff Ryder 

jryder@uarts.edu 

Director 

215-717-6466 

Writing for Film and Television is an 
undergraduate program dedicated to the art 
of dramatic writing for film and television. 
The dramatic script serves as the creative 
blueprint for the collaborative creation in 
film and television. The curriculum for the 
program aims to educate and prepare stu- 
dents for the professional world in this 
unique genre of wriUng. 

A four-year sequence of studio wrifing 
courses act as the cornerstone of the cur- 
riculum. Starting with Dramatic Structure in 
the first year, students will create their own 
written work in an intensive workshop envi- 
ronment. In the second year, screenwriting is 
introduced, along with script analysis. In the 
third and fourth years, students will be 
writing full-length scripts for film. 
Adaptafion from ficfion and nonfiction 
sources complements students" original 
written work. To appreciate the art form, as 
well as the collaborative spirit of film and tel- 
evision, there are courses in film and video 
production, as well as survey courses in the 
history of film and television. A strong liberal 
arts experience in drama, literature, and his- 
tory gives students the breadth of knowledge 
required of the professional writer. 
Internships in the senior year will provide 
students with an exposure to a professional 
work setting. 

In addition to the major, students may take 
several minors in five-course sequences 
designed to complement their major 
Students in Writing for Film and Television 
are particularly interested in the minors in 
digital filmmaking, documentary video, 
game design, strategic advertising, or Web 
drama. The department also offers a minor in 
screenwriting available to students in the 
other majors offered by the College. 



Writing for Film 
and Television 

Bachelor of Fine Arts 123 credits 



Freshman 


Credits 


Junior Year Credits 


Fall 


Fall 






WMI13 


Dramatic Structure I 


3.0 


WM321 


Advanced Screenwriting I 


3.0 


WM 253* 


History of Television 


3.0 


WM341 


Acting/Directing for Writer 


3.0 


WM251 


Narrative Cinema I 


3.0 


Choose one of the following two: 




HUllOA 


First Year Writing I 


3.0 


HU411B*" 


*Shakespeare 


3.0 


HU 103 A 


Intro, to Modernism I 


3.0 


HU413*** 


Literature and Film: 




Fall Total: 




15.0 




From Text to Screen 




Spring 








Electives 


6.0, 






HUXXX 


Liberal Arts 


3.0 


WM114 


Dramatic Structure II 


3.0 








WM252 


Narrative Cinema II 


3.0 


Fall Total: 




18.0 


HU 264** 


Modem American History 


3.0 


Spring 






HUllOB 


First Year Writing II 


3.0 


WM 322 


Advanced Screenwriting II 


3.0 


HU 103 B 


Intro, to Modernism II 


3.0 


WM317 


Episodic TV Writing 


3.0 


Spring Iota 




15.0 


WM315 


Adaptation from Fiction 
Electives 


3.0 
6.0 




30.0 








rrcsnman i 




_ Spring Total 




15.0 


Sophomore Year 
















Fall 


Screenwriting I 


3.0 


~ Junior Total 




33,0 


WM214 


Senior Year 




WM343 


Film Story Analysis 


3.0 








Fall 






WM241 


Arts of the Media 


3.0 






HU320A* 


Found, of 




WM411 


Senior Thesis I 


3.0 




Western Literature I 


3.0 


WM316 


Adaptation from Non Fiction 3.0 


HUXXX 


Liberal Arts 


3.0 




Electives 


6.0 








HU390 


Mass Media and the Arts 


3.0 


Fall Total: 




15.0 


Fall Total: 




15.0 


Spring 












WM215 


Screenwriting II 


3.0 


Spring 






WM243 


Screenplay Analysis 


3.0 


WM412 


Senior Thesis II 


3.0 


CM 290 


Video Production Worksho] 


3.0 


WM499 


Internship 


3.0 


HU320B* 


Found, of 






Electives 


6.0 




Western Literature II 


3.0 


HUXXX 


Liberal Arts 


3.0 


HUXXX 


Liberal Arts 


3.0 


Spring Tota 




15.0 


Spring Tola 


Year Total: 


15.0 
30.0 


Senior Year Total: 


30.0 


Sophomore 









* Fulfills three credits of the discipline 

hisloiy requirement. 

** Fulfills three credits of the social sciences 

requirement. 

*** Fulfills three credits of the literature 

requirement. 



130 



The University of ttie Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 




Undergraduate and Graduate 
Course Catalog 
2003 • 2004 



j2 



The University 
OF THE Arts® 



Art Education 



AE200 
Presentation Skills 

1 credit. 2 hours (undergraduate) 

A component of the Introduction to Visual 
Arts Education, this course addresses effective 
speech and presentation sicills for the teacher, 
artist, and administrator communicating with 
groups, classes, or clients. 
Open 10 non-majors. 

AE 201 

Introduction to 
Visual Arts Education 

2 credits, 3 hours (undergraduate) 

A theoretical and practical introduction to the 
entire field of art education. A survey of var- 
ious aspects of teaching in a variety of 
situations and environments, through field 
observations and classroom lecture-discus- 
sions, including public and private schools 
K-12, as well as specialized and alternative 
settings in museum education, eariy childhood 
educafion, special education (for students with 
disabilities and gifted children), and adult edu- 
cation. 
Open to non-majors. 

AE507 

Educational Media A: 

Teaching and Learning 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Provides students with the knowledge, skills, 
and strategies to successfully integrate educa- 
tional media in the teaching and learning of 
K-12 art. Areas of study include the theoret- 
ical and conceptual basis for educational 
technology in the curriculum, training and 
development of technology skills, such as 
computer graphics. Web page design, elec- 
tronic presentations, and issues and problems 
related to technology use in education. Field 
trips to local K- 1 2 technology arts programs 
further student understanding of technology 
use and integration in educational settings. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 



AE 509 

Educational Media B: 

Planning and Management 

3 credits, 3 hours 

The design, planning, and management of 
educational media in the K-12 classroom and 
school. Topics of study include developing a 
technology plan; software and hardware 
acquisition and assessment: care, mainte- 
nance, and security of classroom and lab 
computer technologies; networking concepts, 
design and protocols; Internet basics and 
issues; and. managing technological and 
human resources. Guest speakers support 
the study of theses topics. Independent visita- 
tions to either K-12 educational settings, 
technology fairs, conferences, or businesses 
will expand student knowledge and under- 
standing of the planning and management 
of technology. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

AE530 

Interactive Media for Art and 

Museum Educators 

3 credits. 3 hours 

This course acquaints students with existing 
technology and media available for instruction 
to art and museum educators. Students learn to 
design and create interactive multimedia proj- 
ects using a variety of multimedia authoring 
tools. 
Open to non-majors. 

AE531 

Multicultural Learning-Arts 

3 credits, 3 hours 

The artistic expressions of Africa, Asia, and 
the Americas, the Near and Middle East, and 
related societies are examined for their aes- 
thetic and contextual meanings. Cross-cultural 
contributions to world art history are recog- 
nized through the study of characteristic styles 
and techniques, dynastic periods of art and 
artists, as well as the relationship of art to 
varied systems of belief. 
Open to non-majors. 

AE532 

Design for Interdisciplinary Learning 

3 credits, 3 hours 

An introduction and curricular model for inte- 
grated learning in which design and the visual 
arts, music, theater, and dance are the central 
means of integrating all disciplines to provide 
a more holistic approach to learning. An 
approach to arts-centered learning through a 
design-based problem-solving model is 
emphasized to address issues in all subjects 
and at all levels of education. 
Open to non-majors with an interest in 
integrated arts. 



AE533 

Art and Inclusionary Education 

3 credits, 3 hours 

This course is designed to provide the full 
scope of methodologies, techniques, and inno- 
vative strategies needed to teach special 
education students effectively. Using the arts 
as a means for adapting to diverse learning 
methods, the K-12 classroom will be regarded 
as a dynamic setting for inclusionary learning. 
The impact of special-needs art education will 
be further realized through direct school and 
community engagement: programs and 
national as well as local organizations will be 
made available to assist in developing field 
placements. Arranged field placement oppor- 
tunities will include a broad range of 
community resources. 
Open to non-majors. 

AE 547 

Program Design and Methods: 

Elementary 

3 credits. 3 hours lecture-discussion, 
3 hours field work (8 weeks) 
Through review of current literature, lectures, 
discussion, field observation, and mini- 
teaching, students explore various educational 
philosophies and develop and implement 
effective classroom curricula based on pre- 
vailing theories of learning and child 
development. 

Prerequisite: AE 201. May be taken by classroom 
teachers or artists who wish to have a broader knowl- 
edge of methodology and content for teaching 
elementary art. 

AE548 

Program Design and Methods: 

Secondary 

3 credits, 3 hours lecture-discussion, 
3 hours field work (8 weeks) 
Continuation of AE 547 with emphasis on 
middle and secondary school. 
Prerequisites:. 4E 201 and either.iE547orAE559. 

AE549 

Program Design and Methods: 

Aesthetics/Art Criticism 

This course is designed to develop skills, tech- 
niques, and strategies for integrating 
developmentally appropriate aesthetics and art 
criticism activities in the K-12 classroom. 
Using prevailing theories of learning, 
teaching, and child development, students will 
design puzzle cases, activities, and curricula 
that promote the philosophical investigation 
and interpfetation of art and aesthetic objects. 
Humanities 



132 



Ttie University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



AE550 

Creative and Cognitive Development 

3 credits, 3 hours 

This course is designed to develop skills in 
recognizing the developmental stages of chil- 
dren, adolescents, and adults according to the 
theories of Jean Piaget, Lawrence Kohlberg, 
Viktor Lowenfeld, and Erik Erikson. In addi- 
tion, the course will explore the learning 
theories of Jerome Bruner, B.F. Skinner. 
Howard Gardner, Madehne Hunter, and 
Bemice McCarthy toward understanding indi- 
vidual differences in creative and cogniti\'e 
development and learning styles. 
Open to non-majors. 

AE 552 

Tiie Art of Teaching 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Teacher preparation and knowledge of instruc- 
tional techniques and curricula development 
will be addressed, including development of 
presentation and speaking skills, professional 
image, teachers' rights and responsibilities, 
and aspects of group processes. The course 
will explore cultural and family factors that 
influence learning, expectations conveyed by 
teachers and peer behavior, and techniques of 
instruction and creativity. A retrospective 
analysis of each student's individual education 
experience and his/her perceptions of teaching 
will be explored through interactive simula- 
tion of classroom situations and teaching 
styles. 

Prerequisite: AE 547. 
Open to non-majors. 

AE559 

Saturday Practicum 

3 credits. 3 hours lecture-discussion. 
3 hours field work ( 10 weeks) 
Students are involved in various aspects of the 
Saturday Lab School. They observe classroom 
instruction, plan and teach lessons, and exhibit 
student work under the supervision of cooper- 
ating master teachers and through the 
instruction of a professor in the seminar por- 
tion of the course. 
Prerequisites: AE20I and A E 54 7. 

AE599 

Professional Writing Intensive 

2 credits, 2 hours 

This course is required for students entering 

all art education programs (pre-certification, 

MAT, MA, MA+EM) if they do not pass the 

Art Education Department writing proficiency 

exam. It addresses the use of effective and 

cogent written communication for the teacher. 

artist, and administrator to classes, groups, or 

clients. 

A rt Education students only. 



AE 602 

History of Ideas in Art 

and Museum Education 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Seminar on major issues and trends in the his- 
tory of art and museum education, with an 
emphasis on child-centered and content-cen- 
tered theories and the theoretical antecedents 
of the Discipline Based Art Education move- 
ment and standards-based education. 

AE606 

Research in Education: 

Methods and Trends 

3 credits. 3 hours 

A graduate education seminar on the principal 
approaches to research for art and museum 
education. The course examines types of 
research, applications, and recent studies for 
their methodologies and findings, grant 
writing, and assessment techniques. 
Graduate students only. 

AE610 

Graduate Studio Seminar 

3 credits. 3 hours 

A one-semester interdisciplinary seminar 
exclusively for arts educators. Topics of broad 
concern to artists will be addressed in 
response to students' work, assigned readings, 
and occasional public lectures or other art 
events in the University and the community. 
Corequisite: Student siiouid he currently enrolled in 
studio work \thile taking this course. 

AE 632 

Applications of 
Interdisciplinary Learning 

3 credits, 3 hours 

This course practically applies the knowledge 
gained in Design for Interdisciplinary 
Learning by offering a variety of curriculum 
frameworks through which elementary and 
secondary school teachers can implement this 
curriculum. Students use a variety of models 
and thematic approaches to develop integrated 
arts curricula that relate the arts to other disci- 
plines. In keeping with interdisciplinary in a 
postmodern aesthetic, students use a variety of 
interactive media. 

Class sessions include lectures, media pre- 
sentations, discussions, interactive group 
activities, guest presenters, and workshops in 
the university and the community. 

This graduate-level course is available for 
advanced undergraduates with an interest in 
integrated arts. 
Prerequisite: AE 532. 



AE649 

Graduate Project/Thesis 

6 credits (or 3 credits per semester for two 
semesters) 

A culminating independent project supervised 
by a faculty advisor. The project or thesis may 
take either of two distinct forms: a) an aca- 
demic thesis presenting original research on a 
significant historical, theoretical, or pedagog- 
ical question relating to visual arts education, 
or b) a studio or curriculum project intended 
for use as a pedagogical tool. 
Prerequisites: AE 602, .AE 606. and.AE 610. 
Other conditions: Students must also complete a 
University seminar, and be approved hy the Chair of 
.Art Education to enroll for the Thesis Project. 

AE659 

Student Teaching Practicum 

4.5 to 9 credits. 

Five full days a week for 12. 2-hour lecture 
discussions. 

An intensive experience built around a 14- 
week student teaching practicum. in which the 
student devotes seven weeks to teaching at the 
elementary school level and seven weeks at 
the middle or secondary-school level under 
the guidance and supervision of master 
teachers and Art Education Department fac- 
ulty. Educational issues and concerns are 
addressed in the seminar portion of the course. 

Students may elect to take the two field 
placements over two semesters. If this option 
is taken, the full 15-week seminar that accom- 
panies the Practicum must be taken in both 
semesters. 

Prerequisites: AE 201. AE 533, AE 547, AE 548, 
and A E 559. 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



133 



Art Therapy 



AT 300 

Introduction to Art Therapy 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Introduces students to key concepts and 
dimensions of the profession of art therapy. 
Course content addresses the different orienta- 
tions and approaches that comprise this 
discipline, as well as the diverse populations 
that are served. Art therapists that work within 
a wide range of settings are invited to present 
to the class to balance the theoretical with the 
practical. 

Prerequisite: HLi 181 A, HU I SI B, or permission 
of instructor 
Open to all students. 

AT 301 

Social and Group Process 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Introduces students to a basic understanding 

of social groups, group behaviors, group 

therapy, and group art therapy. The class helps 

students to better identify their own role as 

well as that of others within a group setting. 

Experiential art tasks are used to underscore 

course material and exemplify group 

dynamics. 

Prerequisite: HU 181 B, AT 500, or permission of 

instructor 

AT 304 

Theories and Techniques of Art 

Therapy with Children and 

Adolescents 

3 credits. 3 hours 

Introduces students to the use of art therapy 
with children and adolescents, including the 
different arenas where art therapists work with 
children, as well as the various approaches 
that are utilized. Normal child development, 
as evidenced in artwork, will serve as the 
foundation for understanding key concepts. 
Indicators of emotional, cognitive, and behav- 
ioral difficulties, as seen in art productions, 
are also presented. 

Prerequisite: HU18IA. HU 181 B. HU 384, 
AT 300, or permission of instructor 



AT 305 

Theories and Techniques of Art 

Therapy with Adults 

3 credits, 3 hours 

The practice of art therapy with adults as 
demonstrated through the use of case material 
from a variety of clinical populations. 
Overviews of diagnostic indicators, as seen in 
artwork, are presented. Issues of long- and 
short-term treatment are addressed, as well as 
a rich variety of interventions at the art thera- 
pist's disposal. 

Prerequisite: AT 300, AT 304, or permission of 
instructor 

AT 401 

Senior Practicum 

3 credits. 3 hours 

A field placement provides an opportunity for 
the student to apply classroom knowledge to 
work within a specific clinical setting. A 
research paper, based on the experience, 
enables students to integrate theory with 
observation and practice. This pracficum 
includes on-site individual supervision by an 
art therapist, as well as a small group supervi- 
sion on campus with the Art Therapy faculty. 
Prerequisites: HU 181 A. HU 181 B. HU384, 
HU483.AT300.AT301,AT304andAT305. 
Open to Art Therapy Concentration students only. 



Communication 



CM 101 

Communication, Culture, 
and Process 

6 credits. 7.5 hours 

Grounds students in an exploration of commu- 
nication as a social and cultural process by 
integrating theory and analysis with practical 
production projects. The course draws on 
theory and research in communication, lin- 
guistics, anthropology, and sociology, applied 
across cultural settings. Student work includes 
reading, writing of reaction papers, and proj- 
ects combining observations and analysis of 
communication processes with digital video 
production. The studio component of the 
course begins with basic instruction in the use 
of digital video camera and audio equipment 
and covers logging, organizing, importing, 
editing, and presenting digital material. 
Projects employ video to document observa- 
tions of nonverbal communication, visual 
communication, interviews and speech events, 
and performances. Studio time will be linked 
to course projects. 

CIW 120 

Sound Communication 

3 credits, 4.5 hours 

This introduction to the field of sound com- 
munication enables students to conceptualize 
the importance of sound in cultural life and 
prepares them in practical approaches to field 
recording and working with various types of 
sound. The course surveys approaches to 
sound as a critical dimension of social com- 
munication through readings and a broad 
range of audio examples, including documen- 
tary, journalistic, theatrical, and experimental 
approaches. Students receive training in dig- 
ital audio field and post-production 
equipment, and complete practical field exer- 
cises and an intensive sound project. 



^34 The University of Uie Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



CM 201. CM 202 

Media Forms and Contexts I, II 

4.5 credits. 7 hours 

A two-semester exploration of a range of 
media forms through the perspectives of 
genre, structure, and representation, com- 
bining analysis and media production. 
Students are exposed to mainstream and alter- 
native media in weekly screenings, focusing 
on formal issues (i.e.. time, space, point of 
view) and social issues (i.e., cross-cultural 
representation, stereotyping, the portrayal of 
gender and sexuality, the representation of 
violence) in order to observe how media forms 
create cultural meanings. Students develop an 
analytical and practical language for talking 
about media genres and an understanding of 
how production practices and audience expec- 
tations combine to affect the structure of 
media forms. In the studio component of the 
course, exercises approach the topics in media 
representation through creative work in docu- 
mentary, electronic journalism, and 
advertising, using digital video, audio, still 
images, and the Web. 
Prerequisile.CM 101. 

CM 211 ^ 

Writing for Media 

3 credits. 4 hours 

An intense writing course developing skills in 
effective, clear, and persuasive writing in the 
areas of media and communication. Students 
work from a variety of source materials, 
including secondary research and primary 
interviews, to craft pieces in several formats. 
Projects include a research paper from sec- 
ondary research sources, a project proposal, a 
treatment for a media work, a newspaper 
article, and a life narrative from interview 
material. Emphasis is on writing structure and 
style, editing and revising, suitability to spe- 
cific audiences, and delivering material on 
time and at prescribed lengths. Class meets 
two times per week, with original writing or 
revisions due each class. 
Prerequisite: HU HOB. 

CM 250 

History of Communication 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Examines how major developments and tech- 
nological changes in communication have 
influenced social and culmral history and how 
major historical and social changes have had 
an impact on communication. Draws connec- 
tions between historically specific and 
contemporary modes of communication in a 
variety of times and cultures, and the present. 
Discipline History ISocial Science 



CM 251 

Communication Theories 
and Culture 

3 credits, 3 hours 

An intellectual history of influential 20th cen- 
tury theories of communication, with a focus 
on the relationships between media and cul- 
ture. This course will intertwine critical 
intellectual developments in the field with 
public events and social movements, seen in 
the context of the changing daily lives of 
people in diverse places. We emphasize how 
communication systems shaped the course of 
public and private lives during this century, 
and how changes in communicadon reshaped 
the way we theorize about the world and the 
field. Students read primary material in its 
original form, view media material illustradng 
critical concepts, write short position papers 
reflecdng on communication theory and cul- 
ture, and complete a term paper on one of the 
course modules. 
Discipline History ISocial Science 

CM 260 

Media Industries 

3 credits. 3 hours 

Investigates the range of organizations and 
economic forces involved in media produc- 
tion. It covers diverse production models, 
from mainstream and corporate to public 
sector to alternative, and draws comparisons 
with media industries in other cultural set- 
dngs. The course focuses on issues such as: 
market structure, government regulation, 
media conglomeration and linkages, produc- 
tion organization, audience measurement and 
behavior, and globalization. Students will 
view examples from broadcast and cable 
news, advertising, Hollywood and inde- 
pendent cinema, public broadcasfing, public 
access and community-based media, and new 
media industries. The course includes a 
research component in which students conduct 
a small original research project, using inter- 
views, fieldwork observations, and/or library 
research. 
Discipline History ISocial Science 



CM 271 

Advertising: Creative Concepts I 

3 credits, 6 hours 

Whether an advertisement appears in print, on 
television or radio, or on the Internet, it is built 
around an idea. Students learn to recognize 
and create strong advertising ideas that are rel- 
evant to the product and the audience. 
Emphasis is placed on print advertising. After 
students grasp what constitutes a strong idea 
by smdying and creating print advertisements, 
they translate that understanding into other 
media. Students learn how to allow their cre- 
ativity to be guided by strategy. Students are 
exposed to outstanding creative work and 
readings, from which they learn essendal prin- 
ciples for developing strong ideas. They apply 
these principles as they create advertising of 
their o\\ n. 

CM 290 

Video Production Workshop 

3 credits. 6 hours 

Acquaints students with the fundamentals of 
visual storytelling by providing hands-on 
experience translating the written word into 
images and sounds. Areas of study will 
include framing images, lighting, using off- 
screen space and sound, editing, and post 
production sound. Students will integrate their 
own wridng into producing some of these 
projects. 

CM 293 

History of Documentary 

3 credits. 4.5 hours 

Introduces the historical and aesthetic sweep 
of approaches to documentary film and video. 
Through extensive screenings and readings, 
this survey begins to expose students to the 
range of choices and creative possibilities of 
communicating information and emotion 
through this form. These works are seen 
through aesthetic choices, technological limi- 
tations, and social setdngs. In addition to 
attending screenings and discussion, smdents 
write two short papers and one longer term 
paper. 
Humanities 

CM 295 

Narrative Video Production 

Worl<shop 

3 credits. 6 hours 

Hands-on course in directing and producing of 
narradve film with major emphasis on story- 
boarding, blocking and rehearsal of actors, 
dramatic beats, camera placement, point of 
view, coverage, long takes, and analytic mon- 
tage, as .well as the fundaments of continuity 
editing. Includes three directing exercises and 
a 10-minute final project. 
Prerequisite: CM 290 or permission of instructor 



The University of the Ans Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



135 



CM 340 

E-Publishing Thesis Project 

3 credits, 3 hours 

A culminating course for students in the 
e-music minor in which they develop an appli- 
cation. Students develop a proposal for an 
application and carry the idea through 
research implementation, execution, and pres- 
entation. With the consent of the instructor, 
projects may be the work of one student or 
that of a group of students, be in a variety of 
shapes, and in a variety of media. 
PrerequisUe: Permission of instniclor. 

CM 350 

Gender Images in Media 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Explores the representation of gender and sex- 
uality in the media over the past century and 
how images of male and female both follow 
and create social change. 
Prerequisite: HU 103 B. 
Liberal Art elective 

CM 360 

Communication Production 

Woritshop 

3 credits, 6 hours 

This project-oriented production course is 
designed to offer students an opportunity to 
work on a publication project in a specific 
communication medium or genre otherwise 
unavailable. Many of these projects will be 
built with the intention of being published or 
made available to an audience beyond the 
classroom: some of them will also be con- 
nected to extracurricular clubs or activites. 
Students will work collaboratively on projects 
in this meduim, and present their work to an 
audience of peers and/or professionals. 
Projects will include: developing a Web radio 
site, producing a television commerical, pro- 
ducing advanced audio projects, developing 
an online publication, etc. 
Prerequisite: CM 1 01 or permission of instructor 

CM 371 

Advertising Strategy Development 

3 credits, 4.5 hours 

Grounds students in the business side of cre- 
ative advertising. Examines the functions of 
the various departments within an advertising 
agency, focusing on strategic development, 
and introducing students to the three key steps 
in that development- market segmentation, 
brand positioning, and research. Students 
learn a variety of qualitative and quantitative 
research methods and analytical methods, and 
apply what they have learned by developing 
and presenting an advertising strategy for an 
actual product. 



CM 372 

Advertising: Creative Concepts II 

3 credits. 6 hours 

Having learned during the fall of their junior 
year how to create strong individual concepts, 
students go on to create broader and deeper 
concepts that can form the basis for a number 
of ads and learn how to execute an idea in 
more than one medium. The course begins by 
examining award-winning print campaigns in 
order to recognize suitable ideas for multi-ad 
campaigns: to identify elements and themes 
and their grounding in research; and to under- 
stand the consumer. The course then examines 
how interactive media are being used to build 
customer relationships and brand identities, 
and explores the strategic functions of these 
new media. Students apply what they have 
learned by developing storyboards for a 
product or service that reinforces that 
product's existing brand personality. 
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. 

CM 373 

Introduction to Public Relations 

3 credits. 4.5 hours 

Introduces students to the fundamentals of 
public relations, viewed as a marketing com- 
munications tool, and pays special attention to 
its role in the non-profit sphere. Reviews the 
functions of a wide range of marketing com- 
munications tools and explores how PR can be 
used in conjunction with them to achieve an 
organization's objectives, helping students to 
come to understand the role of public relations 
in the overall marketing communications plan. 
Students learn how to coordinate messages in 
order to allow the company to speak with one 
voice and reinforce one overall corporate 
identity, with special attention to social mar- 
keting and the public. Students apply what 
they have learned by working on a series of 
projects that culminate in the development of 
a public relations proposal for a non-profit 
organization using the principles and practices 
defined and discussed in this course. 
Prerequisite: HU HOB or permission of instructor. 



CM 381 

Digital Journalism I 

3 credits, 6 hours 

The primary skills and practices involved in 
constructing news for the online environment. 
Begins with an exploration of the evolution of 
journalism from print to online and digital 
forms. By looking critically at a range of jour- 
nalistic examples, and reading about the 
changing work of reporting, students grapple 
with the differences between traditional and 
new media forms of journalism and begin to 
learn the practice of reporting for the World 
Wide Web. They work through a set of exer- 
cises researching story ideas, pitching them to 
the class, conducting interviews, gathering 
images, and writing, designing and posting 
short pieces for the Web, introducing them to 
the possibilities and constraints of working in 
this medium. 
Prerequisite: CM 202 or permission of instructor 

CM 382 

Digital Journalism II 

3 credits, 6 hours 

A more intensive course in digital journalism, 
building on CM 38 1 : Digital Journalism I, in 
which students explore the present state and 
future possibilities for journalism in the on- 
line environment. Here students work in teams 
and on their own to complete a more complex 
set of online journalism projects, researching 
story ideas, pitching them to the class, con- 
ducting interviews, and writing and designing 
story sites for the Web. 
Prerequisite: CM 381. 

CM 383 

News and Culture in the Digital Age 

3 credits. 3 hours 

Surveys both the impact of social issues and 
concerns on journalism and the social impact 
of journalism on society. Working between 
readings about journalism and society, and 
case studies, both past and current, of how 
journalism operates within our region and 
nation, students learn about how issues such 
as race, gender ethics, technology, and the 
changing nature of the news business affect 
the work of journalists. 
Required of students in the Digital Journalism 
Concentration. 



136 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



CM 391 

Documentary Media Production I 

3 credits. 6 hours 

Develops an understanding of the conceptual, 
aesthetic, and pragmatic dimensions of 
making documentary video and audio. Early 
in the semester, students are exposed to exam- 
ples of a variety of documentary approaches 
through partial screenings and readings, to 
Illustrate the range of choices and creative 
possibilities of communicating information 
and emotion through this form. They are also 
introduced to more sophisticated digital video 
technologies than they have employed in the 
curriculum previously. Students simultane- 
ously work through a series of structured 
exercises, and later work in teams to develop 
small-scale documentary projects. Project 
work includes pre-production research, inter- 
views, original shooting in small crews, and 
editing and presenting finished work. 
Prerequisite: CM 202. CM 290 or permission of 
instructflr 

CM 392 

Documentary Media Production II 

3 credits, 6 hours 

Develops a deeper understanding of the prag- 
matic, conceptual, and aesthetic dimensions of 
producing documentary video and audio. 
Exposure to contemporary issues and 
approaches in documentary media making 
through screenings and readings. Students 
achieve increased mastery of more sophisti- 
cated digital video technologies than they 
have employed in the curriculum previously, 
and work through a series of project stages in 
the development of a medium-length docu- 
mentary. Each student is responsible for 
taking his or her own project through to com- 
pletion and presenting this project to his or her 
colleagues; they collaborate on these projects 
in teams. 
Prerequisite: CM 391. ■ " 

CM 395 

Advanced Narrative Production 

Workshop I 

3 credits, 6 hours 

The first part of a two-semester production 
studio in which students plan, shoot, and edit a 
digital film project, roughly 20 minutes in 
length. During this course, students advance 
from locked screenplay through principal pho- 
tography, including preparation of a shooting 
script and storyboards; pre-production issues 
such as location scouting, producfion design, 
casting, and rehearsals; and the shoot itself. 
By semester's end, students assemble their 
best takes for screenings and critiques. 
Prerequisite: CM 295. 



CM 435 

Current Issues in Communication 

3 credits. 3 hours 

Explores the changing landscape of ethical 
and policy issues in communication from a 
critical and intellectual perspective, with a 
focus on emerging issues driven by the shift to 
digital media (image ethics and manipulation, 
intellectual property, changing nature of distri- 
bution, etc.). Building on previous coursework 
and studio experiences, students read material 
from current literature and write reflective and 
research-based papers on selected issues. 
Presentations by guest speakers in the various 
industries and independent sectors provide a 
real-world perspective on how these issues 
affect professional practice. 
Prerequisite: CM 260. 

CM 461. CM 462 
Senior Studio I, II 

4.5 credits. 7 hours 

In this intensive project-based two-semester 
studio, students work in multifunctional teams 
on a common theme, collaborating on the 
development of their own presentation-quality 
work in their medium of choice and concen- 
tration (documentary, social marketing, or 
online journalism). They research and develop 
their project proposals in the fall semester, 
collaborating with individuals and institutions 
in the region, and begin production work, 
resulting in a short piece in video, audio, 
and/or online form. They continue this project 
work in the spring semester. This studio work 
is supplemented by additional readings about 
relevant historical, critical, and practical issues 
and screenings of contemporary work. 
Students write reflective pieces about their 
production experiences in light of these histor- 
ical and contemporary issues, and complete 
the year-long course with a portfolio of their 
own creative work. 
Prerequisite: CM 3 72. CM 382, or CM 392. 

CM 499 
Internship 

1.5 credits 

Professional internship with a media organiza- 
tion or producer. Student needs to gain 
approval for internship from advisor, meet 
periodically for supervisory discussions, and 
complete a short, reflective essay at the end of 
the internship. 
Open to Communication majors only. 



Crafts 



CR 111 

Freshman Ceramics 

1.5 credits, 3 hours 

Through lecture and demonstrations, basic 
skills such as handbuilding, throwing, and 
press molding are addressed, with an introduc- 
tion to loading and firing kilns and mixing 
clay and glazes. Problems are given with an 
emphasis on developing each student's poten- 
tial for personal expression and artistic 
invention. Freshman students are encouraged 
to participate in the departmental guest lecture 
series and field trips. 

CR 121 

Freshman Fibers and Mixed Media 

1 .5 credits. 3 hours 

Provides foundation students with a hands-on 
studio experience grounded in fabric 
processes and materials as a means of per- 
sonal expression. The student receives an 
introduction to stamp printing and direct 
painting on fabric, collage, three-dimensional 
off'-loom structures, as well as tapestry 
weaving on frame loom. Guidance is offered 
in the form of demonstrations, slide presenta- 
tions, field trips, informal discussions, and 
intensive group critiques. 

CR 131 
Freshman Glass 

1.5 credits, 3 hours 

Explores glass as an expressive and creative 
medium. Students work with flat glass in 
stained-glass techniques. 

CR 141 

Freshman Jewelry and 

Metalsmithing 

1 .5 credits, 3 hours 

An introduction to metal work through several 
beginning jewelry projects. Students learn 
basic fabrication techniques through simple 
hollow construction; movement is approached 
through aspects of linkage and chainmaking; 
forming and fabrication are covered as well. 

CR161 

Freshman Furniture and Wood 

1 .5 credits, 3 hours 

The introduction of wood as a material, basic 
joinery theory, and the ability to manipulate 
the material safely with both hand and power 
tools. Lecture and demonstration of the prop- 
erties of wood, the proper use of the handsaw 
and shaping tools, including rasps, chisels, 
small hand planes, and gouges. 



The University of the Art.s Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



137 



CR 200 A/B 
Projects I 

3 credits/semester: fall and spring, 6 hours 
Art making dealing with crafts issues and con- 
cepts. Individual project consultations are 
supplemented by lectures, visiting artists, and 
group critiques. As this course is content- 
based, students use any/all crafts studios 
during in-class work time and open studio 
hours. (Students have access to crafts studios 
where they have completed or are currently 
taking a media-specific course.) Non-crafts 
majors taking this course may also work in 
their accustomed media. 
Corequisile: Enwllmem in a stitdio course. 

CR 211 A/B 
Introduction to Throwing 

3 credits, 6 hours 

Beginning studio work with clay using the 
throwing process and related glazing and 
firing techniques. Problems are given with an 
emphasis on developing each student's poten- 
tial for personal expression and artistic 
invention. 

CR 212 A/B 

introduction to Handbuilding 

3 credits, 6 hours 

Beginning studio work with clay using the 
handbuilding processes of slab, coil pinch, and 
pressing form molds, plus related glazing and 
funng techniques. Problems are given with an 
emphasis on developing each student's poten- 
tial for personal expression and artistic 
invention. 

CR 221 A 

Introduction to Fibers Mixed Media 

3 credits, 6 hours 

An introduction to both tradidonal and experi- 
mental uses of materials and structural 
processes in the fabric media. Assignments 
focus on the exploration of two- and three- 
dimensional forms in preparation for versatile 
approaches to the fibers media. A range of off- 
loom mixed media techniques is covered. 

CR 221 B 

Introduction to Color and the Loom 

3 credits, 6 hours 

An introduction to both traditional and 
experimental uses of materials and structural 
processes in the fabric media. Students 
explore the potential of two- and three- 
dimensional forms in preparation for versatile 
approaches to the fibers media. Loom-woven 
structures, tapestry, and woven color are 
covered. 



CR 222 
Constructed Surface 

3 credits, 6 hours 

Through a series of developmental assign- 
ments, students are provided with a solid 
technical and conceptual base in the fabric 
media. Non-loom constructions, color, and 
multifiber dye techniques are covered. 

CR 223 A/B 
Papermaking 

1.5 credits, 3 hours 

Through slide lecture/demonstrations and 
films, this studio course introduces students to 
all aspects of traditional Western and Japanese 
papermaking techniques including pulp prepa- 
ration, sheet formation, pressing, and drying 
sheets. Students learn refined, professional 
methods as well as explore the creative versa- 
tility of pulp. Classes include: casting 
three-dimensional objects and bowls, building 
subtle relief images in colored pulp, and 
painfing with pulp. Various fibers explored 
throughout the semester include unique ones 
made from garden vegetables and indigenous 
plants. 

CR227 

Experimental Costume Design 

1.5 credits, 3 hours 

An introductory mixed media fibers 

studio where students transform the body into 

a fantastical art form through hat, mask, and 

unconvendonal garment construction. 

Students are introduced to a wide range of soft 

materials including fabrics, plastics, net, 

gauze, rugger yarns, paper, etc., and to simple 

printing/dyeing fabric embellishment 

processes. 

CR 231 A/B 

Introduction to Glass Blowing 

3 credits. 6 hours 

Through demonstrations, assignments, and 
tutoring by the instructor, the students are 
guided toward mastery in oftTiand blowing. 
Blowing of well-balanced functional and non- 
functional forms is emphasized. The aesthetics 
of contemporary and historical glass are intro- 
duced. Demonstrations and tutoring guide the 
students in exploring the use of color in glass, 
two- and three-dimensional surface treatment, 
the relationship between volume and skin of 
forms, blowing into molds, and working in a 
variety of scales. The aesthedcs of contempo- 
rary and historical glass are investigated as 
they relate to the students" work. 



CR232 
Stained Glass 

3 credits. 6 hours 

Students work with transparent and 
opaque glass sheets to produce both two- and 
three-dimensional artwork. Techniques 
include glass cutting and grinding, use of 
caming and copper foil, soldering, enameling, 
sandblasfing and carving, and kilnfiring. 
Typical projects include stained glass win- 
dows or panels, containers, and shallow 
bowls. 

CR 241 A/B 
Introduction to Jewelry 

3 credits. 6 hours 

The student is asked to explore notions of jew- 
elry and body adornment as means of personal 
expression. Projects range from precious jew- 
elry making to adornment that extends into 
performance. Basic goldsmith skills are taught 
as essential, while three-dimensional 
sketching and experimentation in mixed 
media are encouraged. Successful integrafion 
of design, material, and process is the goal. 
Projects are designed to provide students with 
broad exposure to the many possibilides 
inherent in jewelry and ornament as related to 
the human form. 

CR 242 

Introduction to Metalsmithing 

3 credits, 6 hours 

Metal is an extremely versatile material; 
though hard and durable, it is quite malleable 
and easily worked. This course covers direct 
working of metal. Sheet, wire. bar. and rod are 
given form by hammering, seaming, bending, 
etc. The majority of work is done in bronze, 
brass, and copper, though steel, stainless steel, 
aluminum, and precious metals may be used 
as well. Emphasis is on basic hand and 
machine processes conveyed through organ- 
ized, comprehensive, and technical 
information. The focus is on the possibilides 
of metal for the contemporary artist. 
Contemporary issues include the object as 
sculpture, process as a source material, the 
importance of surface and detail, and func- 
tional objects made by artists. 

CR243 

Jewelry Rendering and Design 

3 credits. 6 hours 

Students explore two-dimensional pencil and 
gouache techniques effective in creating the 
illusion of finished pieces of jewelry. 
Emphasis is placed on the skill development 
necessary to communicate and evaluate ideas 
prior to making. Presentation and develop- 
ment of a portfolio are an integral part of the 
course. 



138 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



CR245 

Art for the Body 

3 credits, 6 hours 

Introductory inixed-media course focuses on 
the body as the site-specific locus for a variety 
of art forms. Looking at a range of cultural 
and historical examples, students gain an 
appreciation for the many personal and social 
influences that underiie our conception of the 
human body and how we construct for it. 
Students work in an array of media, with spe- 
cific emphasis on the use of metal, paper, 
fabric, and leather. Technical information 
includes flat pattern making, piecing, and 
sewing; forming and fabricadon; mixed media 
construction; systems of attachment, linkage, 
and closure. Emphasis on the students" ability 
to generate unique solutions to the physical 
challenges imposed by the human body on the 
content of attire. 

CR 249 
Enameling 

3 credits, 6 hours 

Enameling is the art of firing colored glass 
onto metal. The transparent, opaque, and 
opalescent enamel colors are layered to pro- 
duce richness, detail, depth, and brilliance in 
this durable and painteriy medium. Traditional 
techniques such as cloisonne, grisaille. 
Limoges, basse taille, plique-a-jour, and 
champleve'. as well as contemporary and 
experimental processes are explored. 
Once they have gained facility with the 
medium, students produce jewelry or small 
jewel-like paintings. 

CR 251 

Introduction to Molding and Casting 

3 credits, 6 hours 

A course in modelmaking, moldmaking and 

casting techniques, using plaster and synthetic 

compounds. Emphasis is given to developing 

proficiency in slip casting for use in the 

artist's studio and in industry for serial 

production. 

CR 252 

Plaster Worl<shop 

1.5 credits, 3 hours 

An introductory course in modelmaking, 
moldmaking, and casting techniques using 
plaster and synthetic compounds. This course 
emphasizes the usefulness of these media to 
designers and artists. 



CR 253 

Ceramic Technology 

1.5 credits, 3 hours 

A lecture and laboratory course designed to 
initiate investigadon of basic clay and glaze 
materials. The primary intent is for the student 
to gain an intuitive understanding of ceramic 
materials, their practical and aesthetic proper- 
ties, and to develop a series of personal 
glazes ranging from bright gloss to matt. 
Additionally, the nature of clays and the rela- 
tionship among clay bodies, slips, sigallatas. 
and glazes is explored. 

CR255 

Large Scale Handbuilding 

1 .5 credits, 3 hours 

Fundamentals of large scale handbuilding in 
clay. It will address two specific areas: a) 
building a three-dimensional form, students 
learn to use proper clay bodies, how to build 
interior support systems, building and drying 
methods for large work, and moving, loading, 
and firing techniques; b) Students learn how to 
cover large areas with smaller parts and 
explore fitdng and interiocking systems of 
wall relief or free-standing form. Problems are 
given with an emphasis on developing poten- 
tial for personal expression and artistic 
invention. 

CR256 
Ceramics 

1 .5 credits, 3 hours 

Through lecture and demonstration, students 
learn basic skills such as handbuilding. 
throwing, and press molding with an introduc- 
tion to loading and firing kilns. Mixing clay, 
slips, and glazes are also covered. 

CR261 
Introduction to Wood 

3 credits. 6 hours 

Introduction to basic woodworking skills and 
processes, including sharpening and setting up 
hand tools and machinery, theor}' of solid 
wood joinery, and construcdon. In addidon to 
building technical skills, there is emphasis on 
contemporary and historical furniture design 
issues. 



CR277 

Fabric Resist and Embellishment 

3 credits. 6 hours 

Extends students' basic color and drawing 
vocabulary into the realm of ancient tech- 
niques and tools of Indonesia. Japan, and 
Africa. Fabric dyeing and resist methods cov- 
ered include drawing and stamping with 
waxes, sdtching and binding with threads, and 
more. Students acquire a broader sense of 
"mark-niaking." an understanding of the spe- 
cial color properties of dyes, and an ability to 
use non-Western traditional craft methods to 
create contemporary art fabric. 

CR 278 
Fabric Printing 

1.5 credits. 3 hours 

Focuses on the fundamental principles of 
translating drawings and photographs into 
designs and images for screen-printed fabric, 
using a fine art approach. Exploration of 
myriad possibilides in creadng fabric using 
siLkscreen and fabric pigments. 

CR 279 
Paper Casting 

1.5 credits, 3 hours 

Students use paper pulp to build up three- 
dimensional forms. Molds are made of plaster 
and other materials. The emphasis is on paper 
as a material for the craftsperson and sculptor. 

CR280 

Introduction to Metal Casting 

3 credits. 6 hours 

Wax working for jewelry and sculpture, 
rubber molding processes, and lost wax/cen- 
trifugal casdng of bronze and (opdonal) 
sterling silver and karat golds. Extensive tech- 
nical information for students who are 
design-oriented. Assignments allow projects 
in all formats (design, one-of-a-kind jewelry, 
fine art. etc.) and students are encouraged to 
use the techniques demonstrated innovatively 
and expressively. Students taking the course a 
second time choose one aspect of the course 
(wax carving, wax modeling, wax impres- 
sions, vulcanized rubber molding, etc.) and 
produce a small body of work investigating 
that aspect in depth. Procedures for jobbing 
out work to professional contract casters; 
more experienced students send some of their 
work out to be molded or cast. 



Tlie University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 200S/2004 



139 



CR281 

Introduction to Electroforming 

3 credits, 6 hours 

Electroforming is electroplating metal onto a 
nonmetallic surface or object. Metal may be 
built up on nonporous materials such as wax, 
plastic, glass, stone, and lacquered found and 
natural objects. Wax may be removed from 
electroformed objects to leave a strong, light- 
weight, hollow, self-supporting metal shell. 
Students will work in electroformed copper; 
assignments are structured to allow students to 
work in accustomed formats and/or combine 
electroforming with other materials and 
processes. 

CR 282 

Metal Furniture 

3 credits, 6 hours 

Questions our cultural assumptions about fur- 
niture. Are common furniture forms dictated 
by functional requirements or arbitrary 
choices, which have become traditional? 
Metal (steel, aluminum, bronze) is used for its 
strength and versatility; other materials are 
combined with metal according to student 
ideas and interests. Techniques include 
bending/forming of rod, tube, and plate, oxy- 
acetylene welding, brazing, mechanical 
fasteners/tap and die, riveting, 
and light blacksmithing. Typical student 
projects include small tables, lamps, 
chairs, outdoor/public furnishings, and 
experimental forms. 

CR 283 

Small Scale Steelworking 

3 credits, 6 hours 

Steel is a metal with unique properties. This 
course covers light blacksmithing, thin-sheet 
welding, and other techniques suitable for 
working steel at tabletop size. Aluminum and 
other metals may also be used where appro- 
priate. The focus is on the possibilities of 
metal for the contemporary craftsperson. 
Contemporary issues include the functional 
object, the decorative impulse, process as a 
source of inspiration, and the importance of 
surface detail. 

CR286 
Wood Carving 

1 .5 credits, 3 hours 

An introductory course focused on the devel- 
opment of skills and a survey of historical and 
contemporary precedents. The class will cover 
tools: selection, use, and sharpening; lamina- 
tion and joinery utilized for carving; finishing 
techniques; materials, and choice of woods; 
letter carving, designs and content. Students 
will provide their own carving tools. 



CR287 

Low-Tech Furniture 

3 credits, 6 hours 

Using materials gathered from nature, stu- 
dents make chairs, tables, and other functional 
objects with a minimum of technical and 
mechanical procedures. Inspired by the 
design inherent in natural materials, branches 
and twigs, found objects, and imaginative 
thinking, the class conceives and executes a 
series of projects, mosdy with simple hand 
tools. The woodworking techniques demon- 
strated are simple and straightforward; even 
the most 10-thumbed, tool-inept, and 
machine-wary students are welcome in 
this class. 

CR 300 A/B 
Projects II 

3 credits, 6 hours 

Art making which deals with crafts issues and 
concepts. A continuation of Projects I, work 
becomes increasingly student-determined as 
the dialogue becomes more subjective. As this 
course is content-based, students use any/all 
crafts studios during class time and open 
studio hours. (Students have access to crafts 
studios where they have completed or are cur- 
rendy taking a media-specific course.) 
Non-crafts majors taking this course may also 
work in their accustomed media. 
Prerequisite: CR 200 B. 
Corequisite: Enrollment in a studio course 

CR 322 A/B 

Advanced Fibers Mixed Media 

3 credits, 6 hours 

Through a series of developmental assign- 
ments with a conceptual emphasis, and by 
using acquired knowledge from previous 
semesters, students are encouraged to explore 
forms that reveal the inherent physical quali- 
ties and potential image-making possibilities 
of fabric. Loom-woven and mixed-media 
fabric techniques are used as appropriate, 
depending on the student's interest in the 
development of a diverse range of two-dimen- 
sional constructions, sculptural forms, 
costume, etc. 
Prerequisites: CR 221 B ami lor CR 222. 



CR 329 

Advanced Textile Design j 

1.5 credits, 3 hours | 

Use of the computer in the study of woven j 
textile design. The course introduces fabric | 
structures from simple, plain, and rib weaves, 
through twills, satins, waffle weaves, double ] 
cloth, composite structures, and color effects. | 
Students learn the language of cloth through j 
the incremental development of structures, j 
first notating those structures by hand on point | 
paper, and then using various computer soft- i 
ware programs to develop a wide range of 
fabric structures. At least one structure is real- | 
ized through weaving on a 32-hamess 

hand-weaving computer loom. | 

I 

CR 331 ! 

Advanced Glass Blowing | 

3 credits, 6 hours \ 

Glass is considered as an expressive medium, ' 

and development toward a personal style is J 

encouraged. Students work with hot glass in ; 

advanced offhand work, blowing into molds, j 
casting, and enameling, as well as advanced 
stained glass work incorporating blown and 
cast pieces on two- and three-dimensional 
stained glass problems. 

Prerequisite: CR 23 1 B. \ 

CR 332 A/B \ 

Advanced Fusing and Stained Glass 

3 credits, 6 hours 

Glass is the vehicle for creative expression , 
and aesthetic growth. During the first semester ' 
the students focus on developing a personal \ 
theme in their work under close guidance of j 
the instructor During the second semester the i 
students create a consistent body of work and I 
present it in a small show, and trace the histor- , 
ical and contemporary sources of inspiration 
of their work in a written or oral paper. 
Prerequisites: CR 231 B andlor CR 232. 

CR 370 A/B 

Advanced Throwing | 

3 credits, 6 hours ' 

Concentration on resolving conceptual and j 

formal issues as they relate to individual \ 

exploration on the wheel. Problems encourage i 

uniqueness and challenge abiliues. Typical j 
issues include usage and symbolic function, 

serial production, the table, site-oriented \ 

applications, and medium to large-scale use of '■■ 
materials. All problems stress practical as well 

as aesthetic resourcefulness with clay on the ! 
wheel. Senior craft majors taking tiiis course 

may choose to spend all or part of their time ' 

producing thesis work to supplement the j 

thesis component of the Crafts Projects III. ; 
Prerequisite: CR2I1 B. 



1^0 



Tlie University of the Alts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



CR 371 A/B 
Advanced Ceramics 

3 credits. 6 hours 

Concentration on resolving conceptual and 
formal issues as they relate to individual 
exploration. Problems encourage uniqueness 
and challenge abilities. Typical issues include 
usage and symbolic function, production, and 
site-oriented applications, and medium to 
large-scale use of materials. All problems 
stress practical as well as aesthetic resource- 
fulness. Senior Crafts majors taking this 
course may choose to spend all or part of their 
time producing thesis work to supplement the 
thesis component of Crafts Projects III. 
Prerequisite: CR 212 B. 

CR 380 A/B 

Advanced Jewelry/Metals 

3 credits. 6 hours 

Built upon a basic grounding in jewelry con- 
cepts and techniques. Lectures, technical 
demonstrations, and conceptual projects vary 
from year to year so that those students 
retaking the course will not find it redundant. 
The goals of the course are to increase the stu- 
dent's awareness and understanding of jeweh^ 
as a component of our culture, aid the student 
in the development of a personal aesthetic, 
and develop the student's thinking and 
problem-solving abilities. More experienced 
students are encouraged to focus on one spe- 
cialized area of the jewelry field. Senior Crafts 
majors taking this course may choose to spend 
all or part of their time producing thesis work 
to supplement the thesis component of Crafts 
Projects III. 
Prerequisites: CR 241 B aiuilor CR 242. 

CR 381 A/B 
Advanced Metals 

3 credits. 6 hours 

Buih upon basic grounding in metalsmithing 
skills. Technical demonstrations and concep- 
tual projects vary from year to year so that 
those students retaking the course will not find 
it redundant. The goals of the course are to 
increase the student's awareness of metal's 
possibilities, increase the student's metal- 
working skill, aid in the development of a 
personal aesthetic, and develop the student's 
thinking and problem-solving abilities. Senior 
crafts majors taking this course may choose to 
spend all or part of their time producing thesis 
work to supplement the thesis component of 
Crafts Projects III. 
Prerequisites: CR 241 B aiullor CR 242. 



CR386 
Advanced Wood 

3 credits. 6 hours 

Covers tools, joinery, methods, and materials. 
Content progresses with increasing com- 
plexity, involving machining, hand tools, 
finishing, and surface treatments. Senior crafts 
majors taking this course may choose to spend 
all or part of their time producing thesis work 
to supplement the thesis component of Crafts 
Projects III. 
Prerequisites: CR26I. 

CR 400 A/B 
Projects III 

3 credits. 6 hours 

The student selects a topic and produces a 
thesis body of work for-the Crafts Senior 
Thesis Exhibifion. Part of this course is Senior 
Seminar, a forum for the discussion of ideas 
and issues through student participation, guest 
lectures, and professional offerings. The 
modem craft aesthetic is examined through 
crifical dialogue. Emphasis on the interde- 
pendency of all the arts, with an eye to the 
unique contribution of crafts ideology and 
practice. Topical discussions encourage stu- 
dents to find contemporary relevancy and 
validity in an analysis of historical precedents. 
Other topics include: making an artist's pres- 
entation, resume preparation, writing an 
artist's statement, recordkeeping and ta.xes. 
grant writing, and career opportunities. 
Particular attention is paid to the style and sur- 
vival techniques of contemporaries working in 
crafts media. 
Prerequisite: CR 300 B. 
Corequisite: Enrollment in a studio course. 

IN 449 

Crafts/Fine Arts Internship 

3 credits. 90 hours/semester 

Conditions for enrollment; Must be enrolled 

as a junior or senior in a BS or BFA program; 

must have a 2.5 cumuladve GPA: and cannot 

enroll for more than 1 8 credits, including 

those earned from the Internship during that 

semester. 

Open to Crafts and Fine Arts majors only. 



MFA in Ceramics 

Each summer session will begin with a 
detailed review of the student's previous 
work, assessing progress, addressing 
issues, and planning the siimtner's work. 
Ongoing individual meetings with the 
studio mentor will be augmented by 
group critiques at the beginning, middle 
and end of the summer session and by 
occasional group or individual critiques 
with visiting artists. Each summer's 
course concludes with plaiming for work 
to be continued on an indepeitdent-study 
basis during the acadetnic year 
Independent studio work is assessed at 
weekend critiques held at periodic inter- 
vals and at the end of the fall and spring 
semesters. 

The following courses are open to students in 
the summer MFA program only. 

CR610 
Major Studio I 

6 credits. 10 hours 

Evaluation of the student's artisfic involve- 
ment, projecting and testing options for the 
direction of the suident's graduate work. 

CR611 
Major Studio II 

6 credits. 10 hours 

Further exploration of opdons, with increased 
awareness of theoretical issues and personal 
vision. Greater focus in the student's work, 
with a view to completing the repertoire of 
skills and expression in the medium needed to 
undertake a thesis project. 

CR 710 

Major Studio III 

6 credits. 10 hours 

Planning and initiarion of a sustained body of 
mature work to be presented in a thesis exhibi- 
fion following the thesis exhibiton semester. 

See complete course listing under 
Master of Fine Arts. 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



141 



Dance 



DA 100 

Rhythm for Dancers 

1 credit, 1 .5 hours 

Provides an understanding and experience of 
rhythm that enables students to hear, feel, 
count, and notate rhythmic structures and 
enhance sensibility and creativity. 
Required of all Danee majors. 

DA 101 A/B 
Ballet I, II 

2 credits. 6 hours 

Fundamentals of ballet technique including 
barre and center floor work. The course serves 
to introduce and develop basic ballet tech- 
nique and vocabulary. Body placement and 
alignment are stressed through an under- 
standing and application of these basics. 
Continuous advancement and development is 
provided from beginning to advanced levels 
throughout this four-semester sequence , 
(Ballet I-IV). 
Open to Dance majors only. 

DA 103 A/B 
Modern Dance I, II 

2 credits, 4.5 hours 

Basic technique of modem dance for the 
development of skills, intellectual under- 
standing, kinetic perception, and maximum 
versatility. Includes barre work, center floor, 
isolation, falls and recoveries, contractions 
and release. Part of a two-year sequence 
(Modem Dance I-IV). 
Open to Dance majors only. 

DA 107 
Eurythmics 

1 credit. 1.5 hours 

Comprises breathing and centering warm-ups. 
isolation exercises, and technical improvisa- 
tion on movement qualities, including 
swinging, gliding, falling, rising, slow motion. 
Students learn to develop choreographic ideas 
through group improvisational structures. A 
continuation of the creative work of DA 107. 
Open to Dance majors only. 

DA 111 
Spanish Dance 

1 credit. 1.5 hours 

Basic techniques of playing castanets for the 
sevillanas, as well as development of funda- 
mental skills in footwork and handclaps 
for flamenco. 



DA 113 A/B 
Jazz Dance I, II 

1 credit. 3 hours 

A presentation of styles designed to broaden 
knowledge and technique of concert and the- 
ater jazz dance. Classes employ floor stretches 
and center barre as wami-up procedures. 
Movement patterns emphasize simuhaneous 
coordination of multiple rhythm pattems in 
difterent parts of the body. Combinations 
advance from simple to complex throughout 
this four-semester sequence (Jazz Dance I-IV). 
Open to Danee majors only. 

DA 115 
Mime 

1 credit, 1.5 hours 

An exploration of the commedia dell'arte, 
Kabuki. and twentieth-century techniques 
developed by Decroux, Barrault, and 
Marceau. Emphasis is placed on animals as 
the primary key to fundamental movement, as 
well as analysis of human movement, 
including elements of age, environment, body 
type, and facial features. 

DA 116 A/B 
Fundamentals of Dance I, II 

1 credit. 1.5 hours 

Basic aesthetic considerations of the dance art 
form. The first semester examines the nature 
and forms of dance and care of the body. The 
second semester allows dance students the 
opportunity to work with their peers in the 
Freshman Project. 
Open to Dance majors only. 

DA 117 
Survey of Music 

3 credits. 3 hours 

Surveys the history of music from ancient to 

modern, including jazz. 

Discipline History 

Required of all Danee majors. 

DA 119 
Yoga 

1 credit. 1.5 hours 

The study of a system of exercises to achieve 

physical and spiritual well-being. 

DA 120 
Mat Class 

1 credit. 1 .5 hours 

Part of the Pilates-based method of exercise. 
The mat class helps build strength while main- 
taining flexibility. This system of exercises 
has been used for over 70 years by dancers, 
musicians, and athletes to help them enhance 
their performance. 



DA 121 

The Alexander Technique 

1 credit, 1.5 hours 

A method for moving with ease and grace that 
can be used in any situation (ballet, jazz, 
modem dance, and also everyday activities). 
By releasing unnecessary tension in move- 
ment, the student learns to avoid dance 
injuries or change harmful habits so that 
chronic injuries can heal. 

DA 123 A/B 
Tap I, II 

1 credit, 1 .5 hours 

Basic vocabulary of tap. and development of 
rhythmically accurate footwork and accompa- 
nying body movements. 
Open to Danee majors only. 

DA 124 
African Dance 

1 credit. 1.5 hours 

The study of the contribution of black dance 
to the development of American dance 
through the mastery of the technique. 

DA 126 

Dance Ethnology 

1 credit. 1 .5 hours 

A survey of the broad perspectives of dance 
as an expression of culture through investiga- 
tion of Western and non-Westem dance forms. 

DA 129 
Nutrition 

1 credit, 1 hour 

Nutrition and its applicafion to food selection, 
with special emphasis on the nutritional needs 
of the dancer. 

DA 130 
Dance Therapy 

1 credit, 1.5 hours 

An examination of the use of dance move- 
ments as therapeutic tools in working with the 
physically and mentally handicapped. 

DA 190 
Language of Music 

1 credit, 1 .5 hours 

The study of rhythm, melody and harmony, 
tempo, dynamics, and musical forms. 

DA 201 A/B 
Ballet III. IV 

2 credits, 4.5 hours 
Continuation of DA 101 A/B. 
Prerequisite: DA 1 01 B. 

Open to Dance majors only. 



142 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



DA 203 A/B 
Modern Dance III, IV 

2 credits. 4.5 hours 
Continuation of DA 103 A/B. 
Open to Dance majors only. 

DA 205 A/B 
Notation I, II 

2 credits, 3 hours 

Notation I is an introduction to the Laban 
system of recording dance movement. The 
course deals with the study of basic notation 
symbols for reading and writing movements 
involving steps, arm and leg gestures, turns. 
and rhythmic and spatial patterns. Notation II 
comprises intermediate study in reading and 
writing dance phrases including torso, parts of 
the limbs, and head. 

DA 211 A/B 
Dance History I, II 

3 credits, 3 hours 

The study of the interaction between dance 
and the society in which it develops, empha- 
sizing the changing role and nature of dance. 
Dance History I deals with dance from the 
Renaissance through Diaghilev's Ballet Russe. 
Dance History II surveys dance from pre- 
World War II to the present. 
Discipline History 

DA 213 A/B 
Jazz Dance 111,1V 

1 credit. 3 hours 
Continuation of DA 113 A/B. 
Open to Dance majors only. 

DA 216 

Music for Dancers 

1 credit, 1.5 hours 

An exploration of various kinds of musical 

materials and literature, from Gregorian chant 

to New Music, relating the .selection of music 

to the creation of dance composition. 

Improvisation utilizing different sounds and 

instruments. 

Prerequisite to Dance Composition (D,4 217). 

Open to Dance majors only 

DA 217 

Dance Composition I 

I credit, 1.5 hours 

Integrates the improvisational skills acquired 
earlier in Eurythmics, Improvisation, and 
Music for Dancers. Designed to provide the 
beginning choreographer with the tools 
needed to structure a dance composition in 
solo and duet forms. 
Prerequisite: DA 216. 
Open to Dance majors only. 



DA 301 A/B 
Ballet V-VI 

1-4 credits. 7.5 hours 
Continuation of DA 201 A/B. 
Prerequisite: Junior status. 

DA 303 A/B 
Modern Dance V, VI 

1-4 credits, 7.5 hours 
Continuation of DA 203 A/B. 
Prerequisite: Junior status. 

DA 305 A/B 

Modern Repertory I, II 

1 credit, 3 hours 

A study of contemporary and/or classical 
repertory by resident or guest choreographers 
or notators, as well as the viewing, discussion, 
and analysis of great works on video and film. 
Prerequisite: Junior status. 

DA 306 A/B 

Jazz Repertory I, II 

1 credit, 3 hours 

A study of concert and theater jazz dance 
repertory by resident or guest choreographers 
or notators, as well as the viewing, discussion, 
and analysis of great works in video and film. 
Prerequisite: Junior status. 

DA 307 A/B 

Ballet Repertory I, II 

1 credit. 3 hours 

The study and performance of dances of the 
Renaissance and Baroque periods, followed 
by major classical and modern ballets. 
Prerequisite: Junior status. 

DA 308 A/B 

Dance Pedagogy I, II 

2 credits. 3 hours 

An introduction to current philosophies and 
practices of teaching dance, and a historical 
survey of the role of dance in education. The 
second semester deals with identification and 
exploration of basic concepts of teaching 
dance, and application of these principles to 
the concrete development of lesson plans. 
Open to Dunce majors only. 

DA 309 A/B 
Partnering I, II 

1 credit. 1 .5 hours 

The basic technique of adagio (pas de deux). 
Students perform major classical works. 
Open to Ballet majors, and Dance majors with per- 
mission of the instructor. 



DA 311 A/B 
Jazz V, VI 

1-4 credits, 1.5-7.5 hours 
Continued development of technique and var- 
ious styles as introduced in DA 113 and 213 
A/B. The course progresses from basic to 
complex rhythm and isolation exercises, and 
movement combinations stressing subtlety of 
dynamics, as well as preparation of repertory. 
Prerequisite: Junior status. 

DA 313 

Elements of Performing 

2 credits. 3 hours 

Analyzes the qualities of dance technique that 
serve the ultimate goal of performance as an 
artist. Students work with the elements of the 
art of dance performance and discover how 
inner focus, motivation, dynamics, muscle 
intensity, rhythmic timing, breathing, and 
movement texture are the essentials. 
Open to Dance majors only 

DA 317 A/B 

Dance Composition II, III 

2 credits, 3 hours 

Continuation of DA 217. Problem solving and 
analysis of materials through individual proj- 
ects. Special emphasis on group 
choreography. 
Prerequisite: Junior status. 

DA 319 

Theater Functions 

1 credit, 1 .5 hours 

A basic production course dealing with con- 
cepts of lighting and set design for dance. 
Students are required to gain practical experi- 
ence by working in the theater on dance 
concerts during the year. 

DA 320 
Intermediate Pilates 

1 credit. 1.5 hours 

Continuation of DA 120 

Prerequisite: One semester Pilates and permission 

of instructor 

DA 321 A/B 
Pointel, II 

1 credit, 1 .5 hours 

Basic technique of dancing ballet on pointe. 

Women's dance variations from the 

classical repertoire. 

Open to Dance majors only. 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



143 



DA 322 A/B 
Improvisation II, III 

1 credit, 1.5 hours 

Individual improvisations are performed on 

themes with objects in restricted or altered 

spaces and times. Various structures are used 

for group improvisation. Free improvisation 

with live music is stressed. 

Prerequisite: Junior status. 

DA 323 A/B 
Tap III, IV 

1 credit, 1.5 hours 

The study and practice of the tap style of 
dance from simple rhythmic footwork to more 
complex multi-rhythms and repertory. 

DA 324 ■ 

Character Dance 

1 credit, 1 .5 hours 

Deals with the study of the relationship 
between ethnic styles of dance and classical 
ballet, and the proper technique for per- 
forming national dances stylized for the 
classical ballet repertory. 
Open to Ballet majors, and Dance majors with per- 
mission of the instructor 

DA 325 A/B 

Ballet for Non-majors V, VI 

1 credit. 1 .5-3 hours 

Continuation of DA 201 A/B. For students 
majoring in Modem or Jazz/Theater Dance. 
Prerequisite: Junior status. 

DA 326 A/B 

Modern Dance for Non-majors V, VI 

1 credit, 1 .5-3 hours 

Continuation of DA 203 A/B. For students 
majoring in Ballet or Jazz/Theater Dance. 
Prerequisite: Junior status. 

DA 327 A/B 
Men's Class I, II 

1 credit, 1.5 hours 

The technical movements frequently per- 
formed by the male dancer. 
Open to Dance majors only. 

DA 328 A/B 

Jazz for Non-majors V, VI 

1 credit, 1 .5-3 hours 

Designed for Ballet and Modem majors. The 
course further develops the vocabulary and 
skills learned in DA 213 A/B. 
Prerequisite: Junior status. 



DA 331 

Concepts of Health and Fitness 

2 credits, 3 hours 

A survey of the health/fitness industry, which 
covers the following areas: personal training, 
aerobics and dance, wellness, and fitness man- 
agement. The course prepares students 
to assume positions in this growing and 
thriving field. 

DA 345 A/B 
Voice I. II 

1 credit, 1 .5 hours 

Vocal training for the non-Voice major. 
Designed to develop the vocal instrument to 
meet both the musical and nonmusical vocal 
requirements of the theater. 

DA 401 A/B 
BalletVII,VIII 

1-4 credits, 7.5 hours 
Continuation of DA 30 1 A/B . 
Prerequisite: Senior status. 

DA 403 A/B 

Modern Dance VII, VIM 

1-4 credits, 7.5 hours 
Continuation of DA 303 A/B. 
Prefequisite: Senior status. ■/ 

DA 408 A 

Dance Symposium I 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Designed specifically for dance education 
majors who will be completing their student 
teaching requirement in the following 
semester. The course includes curriculum and 
instruction materials, professional preparadon, 
and evaluation criteria. Discussions center 
around the application of dance principles to 
the learning situation. The role of the dance 
teacher is examined. 
Prerequisite: Senior status. 

DA 408 B 

Dance Symposium II 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Designed to complement the actual student 
teaching experience. Specific situations, prob- 
lems, and achievements of the student 
teaching process are discussed and evaluated. 
Networking and employment opportunities 
are integral to the course. 
Corequisite: DA 410. 

DA 409 A/B 
Partnering 

1 credit 



DA 410 
Student Teaching 

7 credits, 14 hours 

Students teach under supervised direcfion for 
one semester in a public or private school. If 
placement for student teaching is not within a 
school system, arrangements are made for the 
student to do this supervised teaching through 
local dance studios. 
Corequisite: DA 408 B. 
Prerequisite: DA 408 A. 

DA 411 A/B 
JazzVII.VIII 

1-4 credits, 1.5-7.5 hours 
Continuation ofDA 311 A/B. 
Prerequisite: Senior status. 

DA 417 

Dance Composition IV 

2 credits, 3 hours 

Continuation of DA 317. Senior elective 

course to assist students in preparation of their 

senior concerts. 

Open to Dance majors with Senior status only. 

DA 418 
Repertory Etudes 

2 credits, 3 hours 

Students study a number of Repertory Etudes 
in a variety of styles to improve performance 
and technical skills. The solos selected will 
reflect the history of American dance. 
Students will research the era and, if possible, 
collect oral histories, thereby adding to the 
materials confinually being gathered and 
developed. 

DA 419 A/B 

Dance Production I, II 

2 credits, 3 hours 

Designed to assist senior students in meeting 
their graduation performance requirement. 
Each student participates in the rehearsal, per- 
formance, and technical aspects of the 
senior graduation concerts scheduled at the 
end of each spring. Students are expected to 
take major responsibility for the production of 
these programs. 
Open to Dance majors with Senior status only. 

DA 421 A/B 
Pointe III, IV 

1 credit, 1.5 hours 
Continuation of DA 321 A/B. 
Prerequisite: DA 321 A/B. 



144 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



DA 422 
Styles of Jazz 

1 credit, 1 .5 hours 

An exploration of Jazz styles of historic and 

contemporary Jazz dance artists, from 

Hip/Hop to Fosse. 

Open to Dance majors only. 

DA 424 

Contact Improvisation 

1 credit, 1 .5 hours 

Students learn to develop choreographic ideas 
through partnered improvisational structures. 
Exploration of interactive movement qualities 
include gravity, leverage, and momentum. 
Prerequisite: DA 109 Improvisation I. 

DA 425 A/B 

Ballet for Non-majors VII, VIM 

1 credit, 1.5-3 hours 

Continuation of DA 323 A/B. For students 
majoring in Modem or Jazz/Theater Dance. 
Prerequisite: Senior status. 

DA 426 A/B 

Modern Dance for Non-majors VII, 

VIM 

1 credit, 1.5-3 hours 

Continuation of DA 326 A/B. For students 
majoring in Ballet or Jazz/Theater Dance. 
Prerequisite: Senior status. 

DA 427 A/B 
Men's Class III, IV 

1 credit, 1.5 hours 
Continuation ofDA 327 A/B 

DA 428 A/B 

Jazz for Non-majors VII, VIM 

1 credit, 1.5-3 hours 

Continuation of DA 328 A/B. For students 
majoring in Ballet and Modem Dance. 
Prerequisite: Senior status. 

DA 430 

Survey of the Business of Dance 

2 credits, 2 hours 

Emphasizing the development of tools and 
skills necessary for realizing individual pro- 
fessional goals, vehicles and processes for 
change in the various fields of dance within 
our society. Develops an awareness of man- 
aging life and work as a professional in dance. 
Topics include basic business principles as 
well as career self-management and an 
overview of career opportunities. Guest 
speakers will include faculty and staff from 
within the University as well as experts from 
the field. 



DA 445 A/B 
Voice III, IV 

1 credit, 1.5 hours 
Continuation of DA 345 A/B. 
Prerequisite: DA 345 A and 345 B. 

DA 499 
Internship 

3-12 credits, 90-360 hours/semester 
Intemships are a valuable part of a student's 
academic experience. By reinforcing and 
expanding classroom theory and practice, 
intemships enable students to test career 
choices and gain a greater understanding of 
the workplace through this initial entry into 
the professional world. The ultimate goal of 
the internship is to assist students in testing 
and expanding their professional skills and 
knowledge and enabling them to make 
informed career decisions. 
Open only to Junior and Senior Dance majors. 

DA77X 

Dance Ensembles/Labs 

1 credit, 3-4.5 hours 

DA 772 

Ballet Ensemble 

1 credit, 3-4.5 hours 

DA 773 

Modern Ensemble 

1-3 credits, 3-9 hours 

DA 774 

Jazz Ensemble 

1 credits, 3-4.5 hours 

DA 775 

Senior Ensemble 

1-3 credits, 3-9 hours 

DA 776 

Tap Ensemble 

1 credit, 3 hours 



Dance Courses for 
Dance and Non-Dance 
Majors 

DA 101 X 
Beginning Ballet 

1 credit, 1.5 hours 

A fundamental ballet technique course for 

non-Dance majors. 

DA 103 X 

Beginning Modern Dance 

1 credit, 1 .5 hours 

A fundamental modem dance technique 

course for non-Dance majors. 

DA 104 X 

Beginning Brazilian Dance 

1 credit, 1.5 hours 

DA 111 X 

Beginning Spanish Dance 

1 credit, 1.5 hours 

DA 113 X 
Beginning Jazz Dance 

1 credit, 1.5 hours 

A fundamental jazz dance technique course 

for non-Dance majors. 

DA 114 X 
Karate Elective 

1 credit, 1 .5 hours 

DA 123 X 
Beginning Tap Dance 

1 credit, 1.5 hours 

A fundamental tap technique course for non- 
Dance majors. 

DA 201 X 
Advanced/Beginner Ballet 

1 credit, 1 .5 hours 

A continuation of DA 101 X. 

DA 203 X 

Advanced/Beginner Modern 

1 credit, 1.5 hours 

A continuation of DA 103 X. , 

DA 204 X 
Advanced/Beginner Brazilian 

1 credit, 1 .5 hours 

DA 211 X 

Intermediate Spanish Dance 

1 credit, 1.5 hours 

DA 213 X 
Advanced/Beginner Jazz Dance 

1 credit, 1.5 hours 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



145 



DA 223 X 
Advanced/Beginner Tap 

1 credit, 1.5 hours 

DA 301 X 
Intermediate Ballet 

1 credit, 1 .5 hours 

DA 401 X 
Advanced Ballet 

1 credit, 1.5 hours 



Electronic Media 



EM 110 
Computer Concepts 

3 credits, 3 hours 

A conceptual and hands-on course that intro- 
duces the student to the foundations of digital 
processes in the arts. Experience with word 
processing, basic spreadsheet usage, database 
search techniques, digital photography, scan- 
ning, image processing, compositing, and 
basic page layout techniques. Includes an 
introduction to online services. Dialog and the 
World Wide Web, along with a basic under- 
standing of HTML. Software usage includes 
Microsoft Word, Excel, QuarkXpress, Adobe 
PhotoShop, and Illustrator. Students are given 
assignments in each of the software environ- 
ments as well as supplemental readings. 
No prior computer experience is required. 

EM 201 

Electronic Media/Production I 

1.5 credits, 3 hours 

Addresses the development of foundation 
computer skills in image scanning technology, 
desktop publishing, digital photographic tech- 
nologies, and basic output procedures. 
Technical expertise and efficient working 
methodologies are applied to problems that 
are brought into the class from other design 
courses as well as from both individual and 
group assigned projects. All software is stan- 
dard in current graphic design industry 
practice. 

Prerequisite: Second-semester Sophomore status in 
the Graphic Design department. 

EM 202 

Electronic Media/Production II 

1 .5 credits, 3 hours 

An extension of EM 201 . Addresses the devel- 
opment of advanced computer skills in image 
scanning, technology, desktop publishing, pre- 
press production, color, output technology, 
and digital photographic technologies. Special 
attention is given to comparative study of 
output technologies and the translation of the 
on-screen image to offset lithography. 
Technical expertise and efficient working 
methodologies are applied to problems that 
are brought into the class from other design 
courses as well as from both individual and 
group assigned projects. All software is stan- 
dard in current graphic design industry 
practice. 

Prerequisite: EM 201 or permission of the 
instructor by portfolio review and interview. 



EM 203 

Digital Interactive Techniques 

1.5 credits, 3 hours 

Addresses the development of computer skills j 
in digital time-based software and cyberspace 
software. Special attention is given to interac- 
tivity and theories of informational 
architecture. Technical expertise and efficient 
working methodologies are applied to prob- 
lems in both individual and group projects. All 
software is standard in current graphic design 
industry practice. 

Prerequisite: EM 202 or permission of the 
instructor by portfolio and interview. 

EM 210 

Digital Multimedia 

3 credits, 3 hours 

The elements of digital muhimedia production 
techniques used to create Internet Websites 
and interactive programs. Hands-on produc- 
tion experience as well as a perspective on 
developments in this rapidly growing field 
through readings and lectures. The first half of 
the semester is dedicated to learning the basics 
of Macromedia Director and sound manipula- 
tion software utilized to create interactive 
projects that combine images, sound, and ani- 
mation. 

The balance of the semester is dedicated 
to the creation of a Website using 
Macromedia Dreamweaver. Emphasis is 
on clear communication and the creation of 
intuitive interactive interfaces. 
Prerequisite: EM 1 10 or equivalent introductory 
course that includes experience with the Macintosh 
operating system and a working knowledge of Adobe 
PhotoShop, or permission of the instructor. 

EM 221 

Virtual Sculpture 

3 credits. 3 hours 

Students will create physical models made of 
Styrofoam. wax, or clay, and create virtual 
versions of the same models. Working back 
and forth between the real and the virtual, sm- ■ 
dents will gain an understanding of the 
differences and similarities of the ideas gener- 
ated by each working style. Computer- 
generated images will be combined with pho- 
tographs of physical maquettes and real 
environments. Final products will be digital 
files and 2D prints or slides suitable for com- 
mission proposals, presentations, and artist's 
portfolios. 

Prerequisite: EM 110 or equivalent introductory 
course that includes a working knowledge of Adobe 
PhotoShop, or permission of instructor 



146 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



Fine Arts 



Fine Arts courses are open to non-Fine 
Arts majors on an elective basis as space 
and experience pennits. 

FA 205 

Concepts/Works on Paper 

3 credits, 6 hours 

Offers an opportunity for idea development, 
visual perception, and the organization of 
experience into compositions. Primary 
emphasis is on developing visual expression, 
skill in using various materials, and growth of 
critical evaluative abilities through group dis- 
cussions and critiques. Contour drawing, 
collage, Xerox transfer, book arts, and other 
experimental drawing and printing techniques 
are explored. Students are encouraged to com- 
bine media. 

FA 222 

Drawing: Form and Space 

3 credits, 6 hours 

An introduction to the issues of drawing, 
including perception, analysis, invention, and 
experimentation. A variety of thematic ideas, 
structural possibilities, and imaginative inter- 
pretations are explored. Students are exposed 
to a wide spectrum of precedents in the history 
of drawing and are encouraged to enlarge their 
working definitions of how form and space 
can be effectively expressed. 

FA 223 

Introduction to Figure Modeling 

3 credits, 6 hours 

Modeling from life for the beginner, stressing 
direct observation, eye-hand coordination, and 
depth discrimination. Both perceptual and 
conceptual skills are developed and funda- 
mental studio practices are taught, such as 
armature construction, clay utilization, and 
modeling techniques. Works are fired in clay 
or cast in plaster. 

FA 234 

Drawing Studies 
1.5 credits, 3 iiours 

A three-hour studio course advancing the 
objectives of FA 222 Drawing: Form/Space. 
Emphasis will be on two essential concerns: 
process and purpose. Students will be 
expected to carry out sustained involvement in 
specific projects focused on method and con- 
tent. Studio practices will include both 
open-ended invention and closed-system 
approaches. This kind of sustained focus on a 
variety of techniques and themes will culmi- 
nate in a final term project. 
Prerequisite: Sophomore status. 



FA 235 
Media/Teciiniques 

1.5 credits, 3 hours 

A three-hour studio course of instruction and 
demonstration in a variety of traditional tech- 
nical approaches to the handling of paint 
media, including the preparations of grounds 
and supports. Media options could include oil, 
acrylic, encausfic, casein, gouache, gold- 
leafing, fresco, and egg tempera. This course 
is unique among our course offerings in its 
focus solely on physical processes, not con- 
cept- or image-development. 

FA 330 

Drawing: Site-Specific Projects 

3 credits, 6 hours 

Focus on the production of drawings and 
models of site-specific projects. Issues related 
to public art, environmental art, public and 
private realms, materiality, site selection, and 
site specificity are explored. 

FA 333 A 

Attitudes and Strategies 

3 credits, 6 hours 

A studio-criticism course jointly coordinated 
by the three Fine Arts areas, which presents 
issues that cross over the unique domains of 
the sculptor, the printmaker, and the painter. 
Fine Arts students from all three majors work 
on projects designed to increase their aware- 
ness of the attitudes and strategies embodied 
in artworks. Concepts such as idealism, natu- 
ralism, and expressionism are explored in 
light of their implication for form-making 
methods and principles. Lectures, studio proj- 
ects, and group critiques create a forum for 
advanced study of the purposes and contexts 
of the Fine Arts. 

FA 424 A/B 
Drawing References 

1 .5 credits, 3 hours 

Advanced drawing projects focusing on the 
relation between a given work and its refer- 
ences and resources. Emphasis is on 
understanding the nature of references or 
resource material and the manner in which 
references or resources influence the outcome 
of a work. This studio/critique course aims at 
enhancing students" ability to connect their 
personal and subjective interests to the larger 
context of nature, history, and culture. 
Prerequisite: PT334. PR 333, or SC 333. 



FA 460 

Senior Fine Arts Seminar 

1.5 credits, 3 hours 

The artist's role in historic and contemporary 
contexts. Issues surrounding the various pur- 
poses of art and how culture deals with artists 
are explored through discussion with visiting 
artists, alumni, and faculty. Students work 
toward the acquisition of a professional profile 
in resume, artist statement, and slide prepara- 
tion. Discussion of gallery practices and 
portfolio presentations cultivate an awareness 
of professionalism and career opportunities 
in the fields of painting, printmaking, and 
sculpture. 

Prerequisite: Completion of Junior studio course- 
worli. 

IN 449 

Crafts, Fine Arts Internship 

3 credits, 6 hours 

Opportunities to apprentice to practicing 
artists, gain gallery experience, and work with 
nonprofit organizations, which lead to prac- 
tical experience and knowledge about the 
field. 

Graded Pass/Fail. 

Open to Juniors, Seniors. Fine Arts and 
Crafts students. 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



147 



MFA in Ceramics, 
Painting, or Sculpture 

FA 610 
Studio Topics 

3 credits. 5 hours repeatable 

Brings together students from each of the 

major disciplines to explore studio issues 

common to all visual arts. 

Open only to SUM FA students. 

FA 611 
Graduate Drawing 

3 credits, 5 hours 

An advanced studio focused on developing 
and expanding students" visual language and 
skills while challenging their conceptual 
approach to drawing by examining and 
applying the use of materials and methods 
having historic and cultural origins. 
Open to all CAD graduate students upon 
portfolio approval. 

FA 612 

Professional Practices 

3 credits. 5 hours 

Designed to familiarize students with 
methods, practices, and professional standards 
in preparation for the thesis exhibition and 
eventual entry into the visual arts professions. 
Prerequisite: FA 611. 



FA 691, FA 692 
Independent Studio I, II in 
Ceramics, Painting, or Sculpture 
(Winter/Summer Critique) 

3 credits per semester. 5 hours 
The Independent Studio is intended to assist 
students in establishing independent produc- 
tion in their major discipline while acquiring 
the ability to integrate studio production with 
the demands of off-campus life. At the conclu- 
sion of Summer I and. subsequently, Winter 
Critique I, the student and faculty mentor 
agree on a plan of work to be pursued during 
the off-campus semester, which will be a con- 
tinuation of work begun in the previous 
semester. The students are required to propose 
a direction for their investigations and have 
access to off-campus studio space within 
which to carry out the proposal. Enrollment in 
the Independent Studio requires a commit- 
ment of 150 hours, equivalent to 10 hours of 
studio activity per week during the 15- week 
off-campus semester. The studio mentor meets 
with the student five times during the semester 
at three-week intervals, reviewing the stu- 
dent's progress for a 1-2 hour session. The 
first meeting is a group meeting held on 
campus and the next three are held as indi- 
vidual critiques at the student's studio. One 
meeting may take place at the mentor's studio. 
The last meeting is the final critique of the 
semester, which takes place at the Winter 
Critique held at the University. 
Open to SUMFA students only. 

FA 695, FA 696 

Independent Writing Project I, II 

1 .5 credits, 3 hours 

The Independent Writing Project is a corequi- 
site of the Independent Studio I and II. and is 
intended to inform the student's ongoing 
Independent Studio investigations undertaken 
during the fall and spring off-campus semes- 
ters. The student proposes an area of research 
intended as a continued examination of topics 
introduced during the previous summer semi- 
nars, Structure and Metaphor or Art and 
Society. The student is encouraged to explore 
through writing the range of issues emanating 
from seminar reading and discussion, and the 
relationship of these external influences to the 
development of themes and directions being 
explored in the studio work. 
Open to SUMFA students only 



FA 781, FA 782 

Thesis Writing Project I, II 

1 .5 credits. 3 hours 

The Thesis Writing Project is a corequisite of 
Thesis Preparation I and II. and takes place 
during the fall and spring off-campus semes- 
ters. Research for the Thesis Writing Project is 
intended to inform the student's second-year 
independent studio activity, which focuses on 
identifying and developing potential directions 
for the thesis exhibition and written thesis. 
The student is expected to consider issues 
raised during the previous summer's seminar 
that are particularly relevant to the more 
focused direction of his or her studio work. 
The student independently formulates a pro- 
posal and bibliography for a formal paper to 
be based upon the more developed du'ection of 
his or her work. The range of issues consid- 
ered for further investigation may include 
aesthetic, conceptual, technical, or visual cul- 
ture issues as well as the relationship of the 
major work to other disciplines. 
Prerequisites: FA 692. FA 78 L 

FA 793 

Thesis Preparation I 

3 credits. 5 hours 

Following the successful completion of 
Summer II and the MFA Candidacy Review, 
the student is declared a degree candidate and 
may begin independently producing a body of 
work intended for eventual presentation in the 
thesis exhibition following completion of 
Summer III. In consultation with the studio 
mentor, the student submits Thesis 
Preparation Plan I. identifying and describing 
a direction of investigation to be undertaken 
during the fall semester. The student is 
expected to identify specific issues to be 
addressed: intended focus of the work, consid- 
erations of technique, materials, scale, 
location, etc. The student must propose a per- 
sonal timetable for accomplishing the thesis 
and identify the sources that will be used in 
preparation for the exhibition. Enrollment in 
Thesis Preparation I and II requires a commit- 
ment of 150 hours, equivalent to 10 hours of 
studio activity per week during the 15-week 
off-campus semester. 
Prerequisite: FA 692. 

FA 794 

Thesis Preparation II 

3 credits, 5 hours 

In consultation with the studio mentor, thesis 
candidates propose further development of 
directions begun in studio work the previous 
semester by submitting Thesis Preparation 
Plan II for the spring semester to the mentor. 
Prerequisite: FA 793. 



148 



The University of ttie Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



FA 795 

Thesis Exhibition 

6 credits, 10 hours 

The MFA degree certifies that the artist has 
attained a high level of competence and inde- 
pendent judgment in the discipline and is 
qualified to stand with his/her mentors as a 
master artist. The thesis exhibition and accom- 
panying written thesis are intended to serve as 
a demonstration of this mastery. During the 
final semester, criticism-based research is 
undertaken as a continuation of the summer 
seminar in Criticism and is intended to assist 
the MFA candidate in completing the written 
component of the thesis requirements. 
Prerequisite: FA 794. 



Foundation 



FP 101 

Drawing and SIcetching 

1 .5 credits, 3 hours 

This course is intended to provide individuals 
who are not majoring in the visual arts with 
the basic skills required to represent the form 
of simple objects and the presence of space on 
a two-dimensional surface. No prior drawing 
experience or portfolio of work is required to 
enroll in this course. The class will include 
instruction in the basics of linear perspective 
using both optical and diagrammatic methods. 
In-class projects will focus on fundamental 
principles while homework assignments will 
support the students as they develop the ability 
to sketch and draw, and think and plan, using 
manual drawing tools and materials. 

FP 102 

Sl<etchingthe Human Figure 

1.5 credits. 3 hours 

This course is intended to provide individuals 
who are not majoring in the visual arts with an 
introduction to some of the materials, 
methods, and processes useful when drawing 
the human figure. No prior experience with 
manual media or portfolio of work is required 
to enroll in this course. The course will intro- 
duce a basic series of drawing exercises using 
the figure as a subject. Analytical and respon- 
sive approaches will be compared and a range 
of materials including pencil, charcoal, and 
collage will be used. The figure and the figu- 
rative volume in its immediate spatial 
environment will be studied and the ability to 
capture the gesture, appropriate scale, propor- 
tion, and mass of the figure will be stressed. 
Homework assignments will apply principles 
learned in class. 

FP 103 
Color Basics 

1 .5 credits. 3 hours 

This course is intended to provide individuals 
who are not majoring in the visual arts with 
the basic skills required to work with some of 
the fundamental properties of color and use 
them for representational purposes. The 
course will introduce the basic color vocabu- 
lary and begin training the eye to perceive and 
apply the distinctions of hue, value, tone, and 
temperature. Methods of color classification 
will set the stage for a sequence of projects 
designed to help students develop the ability 
to begin working with color formally and 
descriptively. Homework assignments will - 
apply principles learned in class. 



FP 104 

Materials, Tools and Form 

1 .5 credits, 3 hours 

This course will instruct students in those 
basic manual skills that will help them build 
three-dimensional objects and spatial works. 
No prior experience with manual media or a 
portfolio of work is required to enroll in this 
course. Paper and wood are the primary mate- 
rials that will be used to execute freestanding 
objects of various sizes and all assignments 
will include instruction on how to best use and 
extend the physical properties of these mate- 
rials. Students will be challenged to fabricate 
works with multiple parts as well as works 
that include some formal and mechanical 
complexity. Assignments that focus on the 
design of spaces and the modeling of environ- 
ments will also be included. Instruction will 
be conducted in the foundation studio and 
wood shop and all students will be given an 
orientation to the safe use of that facility and 
all of its power tools. 

FP 110 
Drawing 

3 credits, 6 hours 

Drawing is approached as a process by which 
the student examines and investigates the 
visual world. Line, mark, and shape are 
among the drawing elements emphasized in 
the first semester. With these tools, students 
examine the form and structure of various sub- 
jects while they improve their manual skills, 
strengthen their vision, and begin to define 
their drawing vocabulary. Graphite and char- 
coal pencils and a range of appropriate papers 
are the most frequently used materials. 
Historical precedents are discussed, master 
works analyzed, and relevant practical infor- 
mation-including the elements of spatial 
representation-is assimilated into the flow of 
class assignments. Focus is on the challenges 
and rewards of developing perceptual skills. 
Prerequisites: Aceeptance hr portfolio cf v/f ii- and 
FPWlorFPlOl. 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



149 



FP 111 
Drawing 

3 credits. 6 hours 

Building on the sensibilities, skills, and infor- 
mation of FP 1 10, students refine their 
perceptual abilities, utilize new media such as 
charcoal and inks, and develop additional 
drawing strategies. Students undertake the 
analysis of complex natural objects, sculpt 
volume with line and tone, encounter the chal- 
lenge of drawing the human figure, and meet 
other situations, which demand the assimila- 
tion of new information and the application of 
advanced skills. Controlling proportion, 
building volume, and engaging the illusion of 
space, while at the same time developing the 
desired quality of light and illumination are 
the descriptive goals of the semester. Faculty 
bring skills, projects, and information devel- 
oped in the two- and three-dimensional design 
classes into the service of drawing. 
Prerequisite: FP 110. 

FP 120 
Two-Dimensional Design 

3 credits, 6 hours 

A focused introduction to the two-dimensional 
plane and its elements. The first semester 
defines the terminology and sharpens the 
ability to di.scem and use the visual elements 
of point, line, shape, and pattern. These funda- 
mental elements are studied as independent 
units and brought together, supporting and 
animating one another, in a variety of formats. 
Skills in the use of black and white media 
such as inks, plaka, and acrylic pigments and 
equipment including technical pens, brushes, 
and drafting tools are developed in the first 
semester. The visual forces discovered during 
efforts to combine these elements and mate- 
rials define the more complex subject of the 
class. 

Prerequisite: Acceptance hy portfolio review or 
FPI03. 



FP 121 
Two-Dimensional Design 

3 credits, 6 hours 

Builds on the projects and skills established in 
FP 120. The majority of FP 121 is devoted to 
the introduction and extended study of colon 
The major works of the semester are based in 
the use of acrylic paints and require skills of 
mixing and application. Other color mediums 
such as collage, pastels, watercolors, and oil 
sticks are also explored. Color theories are 
discussed, projects requiring tinfing. shading, 
and toning clarify these basic concepts and 
master works of color are studied. Ideas devel- 
oped in the class are shared with other 
Foundation courses and skills from three- 
dimensional and drawing classes are imported 
to support current two-dimensional projects. 
Representational and nonrepresentational 
form is developed as students integrate past 
experience, refine their skills of observation, 
expand the study of visual forces, and explore 
more complex principles of organization. 
Prerequisite: FP 120. 

FP 130 
Three-Dlmensional Design 

3 credits, 6 hours 

Introducdon to concepts of mass, volume, 
space, the properties of materials, and the 
unique visual qualifies of three-dimensional 
form. The introduction of three-dimensional 
ideas and related terminology is combined 
with the instruction in the use of materials 
such as paper, wood, plaster, and clay, and the 
operation of hand and power tools. Students 
develop the practical experiences needed to 
make objects that counteract and respond to 
forces and answer visual requirements. As the 
semester progresses, challenges of assembly, 
scale, and visual complexity increase. 
Inventive processes, form generation, and con- 
struction are undertaken as properties of 
materials join with visual goals to develop 
new forms. Most importantly, students under- 
stand that they have access to a new language 
as they learn to see, think, and plan three- 
dimensionally. 

Prerequisite: Acceptance by portfolio review or 
FP 104. 



FP 131 
Three-Dimensional Design 

3 credits. 6 hours 

Building on the skills, language, and sensibili- 
ties of FP 130, the second semester undertakes 
more complex projects. Some projects involve 
the combining of several materials and require 
the assembly of multiple parts. The semester 
builds in complexity, exploring the challenges 
of scale and engaging dme and movement as 
part of their conception. Included is the intro- 
duction of environmental works, setting in 
place new principles of three-dimensional 
organization, researching the order of nature, 
and taking up the challenge of representation 
in three dimensions. Faculty relate works and 
share principles with either the two-dimen- 
sional or drawing classes, and attempt to 
harvest skills and sensibilities developed in 
those classes into the service projects in 
Three-Dimensional Design. 
Prerequisite: FP 130. 

FP 140 

Time and Motion 

3 credits, 6 hours 

An introduction to the fundamental principles 
of time-based art: sequence, movement, 
timing, motion design, principles of anima- 
tion, perception, and concepts of narrative. 
Students work in a variety of media using 
manual, computer, video, and body-based 
approaches. 
Prerequisites: FPllO. FP 120. and FP 130. 



150 The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



Graphic Design 



GD 105 

Freshman Graphic Design Projects 

1.5 credits, 3 hours 

An elective course introducing the Foundation 
student to the profession of graphic design and 
its working processes. The classworlc begins 
with directed formal studies and leads to an 
introductory communication project. 
Emphasis on the craftsmanship and working 
methods of the student as well as the breadth 
and depth of the student's individual investiga- 
tive process. Studio lecture/demonstrations 
focusing upon professional case studies and 
field trips. 

GD 210 
Letterform Design 

3 credits, 6 hours 

The analysis and development of letterforms. 
The norms of weight, proportion, character 
width, and alphabetic relationships are devel- 
oped perceptually, by hand. This course 
stresses the inherent optical relationships that 
exist in the construction of typefaces derived 
from the Latin alphabet. 
Prerequisite: Completion of the Foundation pro- 
gram, or permission of the instructor by 
portfolio review and interview. 

GD211A 
Descriptive Drawing 

3 credits, 6 hours 

A freehand drawing course based upon obser- 
vation and analysis of the underlying structure 
and form of man-made and natural objects. 
Logical representation and problem solving 
are emphasized. A visual vocabulary of line, 
shape, value, texture, and spatial organization 
is addressed to develop drawing as a method- 
ology for research and invention. 
Prerequisite: FP 1 1 1, or permission of the 
instructor by portfolio review. 

GD 211 B 
Descriptive Drawing 

3 credits, 6 hours 

A continuation of GD 21 1 A. A freehand ana- 
lytical drawing course that addresses organic 
form and objects from nature. Drawing skills 
are developed to sketch and research visual 
concepts, as well as to use the medium for the 
invention of original images in upper-level 
courses. 
Prerequisite: GD211 A. 



GD 212 

Typography Fundamentals 

3 credits, 6 hours 

The course addresses the basic formal lan- 
guage of typography and the application of 
typographic principles to frame basic commu- 
nication messages. Typographic investigations 
are achieved by both manual and digital 
means. 

Prerequisites: GD 2 10 and enrollment in EM 201. 
.or permission of instructor by portfolio review and 
interview. 

GD 213 A 
Design Systems 

3 credits, 6 hours 

An intensive laboratory where the formal 
aspects of composition, organic and geometric 
form, color, symbolic drawing, craftsmanship, 
and processes of conceptualizing are investi- 
gated. Assignments are founded on directed 
goals and playful investigation to train the stu- 
dent in areas of selection, self-criticism, set 
theory, and visual logic. 
Prerequisite: Completion of the Foundation pro- 
gram, or permission of the instructor by portfolio 
review and interview. 

GD 213 B 
Design Systems 

3 credits, 6 hours 

A continuation of GD 213 A. Further investi- 
gation of the visual language of design, 
culminating in a basic communication 
problem. 
Prerequisite: GD213A. 

GD 306 A 
Typography Emphasis 

3 credits, 6 hours 

This course investigates and defines advanced 
principles of typography in a communication 
context. Directed research based upon typo- 
graphic norms addresses the issues of 
informational hierarchies achievable through 
visual form and structure as well as the 
editorial and expressive potentials of 
typography. Coursework uses traditional and 
digital technologies. 

Students must have working knowledge of 
QuarkXPress and basic Macintosh operation 
or be concurrently enrolled in EM 202. 
Working knowledge of Adobe Illustrator is 
preferred. 

Prerequisites: EM 201 and Junior status in the 
Graphic Design department, or permission of the 
instructor by portfolio review and interview. 



GD 306 B 
Typography Emphasis 

3 credits. 6 hours 

An extension and continuation of GD 306 A. 
The typographic principles of the grid, text 
typography, text hierarchies, image integra- 
tion, all within the context of a multi-page 
format. 

Students must have working knowledge of 
QuarkXPress and basic Macintosh operation 
or be concurrently enrolled in EM 203. 
Working knowledge of Adobe Illustrator and 
Adobe PhotoShop is preferred. 
Prerequisite: EM 202. GD 306 A. or permission of 
the instructor by portfolio review and interview. 

GD 310 A 
Photographies I 

3 credits, 6 hours 

Develops a designer's methodology and view- 
point to achieve both structure and meaning in 
photography, and as a way to extend the range 
of how objects and nature can be seen and 
translated using photographic processes. The 
course explores darkroom techniques, con- 
trolled lighting, and studio setups. Students 
use both traditional photography and digital 
software to create hybrid photographic 
images. Extensive studio and darkroom work 
is required. 

Prerequisites: PF211 A and Junior status in the 
Graphic Design department, or permission of the 
instructor by portfolio review and interview. 

GD 310 B 
Photographies II 

3 credits, 6 hours 

An upper-level elective studio in photography. 
Students undertake self-initiated projects 
to explore various applications of the con- 
structed photograph. The designer's 
perspective and working process are used to 
focus the communication aspects of the 
imagery. Past topics have included medium- 
and large-format cameras, advanced studio 
lighting, and advanced printing and darkroom 
techniques. Extensive studio and darkroom 
work. Traditional and digital media can be 
explored. 

Prerequisite: PF211 A Introduction to Photography 
or permission of the instructor by portfolio review 
and interview. 



Tlie University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



151 



GD 311 A 
Communications Studio 

3 credits, 6 hours 

Developing an understanding of visual rela- 
tionships and how to use them to create visual 
impact and clarity while solving communica- 
tions problems. Invention, intuition, and 
discovery are combined with logical thought 
and thorough preliminary research. Special 
attention is given to refining the student's per- 
ceptual abilities, hand skills, and the 
integration of various media. Use of both tra- 
ditional and computer technologies. 
Prerequisites: EM 201 and Junior stains in the 
Graphic Design department, or by permission of the 
instructor by portfolio review and interview. Students 
must have woricing Icttowledge of Adobe Illustrator, 
basic image scanning, and basic Macintosh opera- 
tion, or be concurrently enrolled in EM 202. 

GD311 B 
Communications Studio 

3 credits, 6 hours 

A continuation of GD 3 1 1 A, concentrating on 
the development of color, sensitivity, and per- 
ceptual abilities within a communications 
context. A working process that develops 
invention through logical thought and intuition 
is applied to communications problems. Use 
of both traditional and computer technologies. 
Prerequisites: EM 202 and GD3II A. Students 
must have working knowledge of Adobe Illustrator, 
basic image scaimiitg, and basic Macintosh opera- 
tion, or be concurretitly enrolled in EM 203. 

GD313 

Color and Image Concepts 

3 credits, 6 hours 

Addresses color and image concepts devel- 
oped deductively from nature and inductively 
thorough experimental, perceptual analysis. A 
communications problem in which color is the 
prominent vehicle is solved in a thorough 
research process. Diverse media are explored. 
Applications may use two- and three-dimen- 
sional formats. 

Prerequisite: Junior status in the Graphic Design 
department, or permission of the instructor by port- 
folio review and interview. 



GD316A 

Drawing Applications I 

3 credits, 6 hours 

The use of drawing as both an expressive and 
an informational vehicle to solve communica- 
tions problems, Formal issues of composition, 
selection, and color as well as the conceptual 
issues of narrative, sequence, and representa- 
tion are focused toward the communication of 
ideas, emotions, and information. 
Prerequisite: GD2I1 B. or permission of the 
instructor by portfolio review and interview. 

GD 316 B 

Drawing Applications II 

3 credits, 6 hours 

An upper-level elective drawing course in 
which students initiate individual projects that 
use drawing as the primary medium to solve 
communications problems. Various media, 
mixed media, and hybrid images are explored 
in a thorough research-oriented design 
process. Connection between formal issues 
and communication effectiveness is stressed. 
Prerequisite: GDSI6A, or permission of the 
instructor by portfolio review and interview. 

GD322 

Three-Dimensional Graphic Design 

3 credits. 6 hours 

Explores the design of messages in spatial 
environments. Investigation of the relationship 
between the communication of messages 
within the context of scale, surface texture, 
light modulation, and their application to 
three-dimensional form, combine both experi- 
mental and practical criteria. Although 
traditional methods of conceptualizing are 
used within a thorough visual process, exten- 
sive computer work is involved. 
Prerequisite: Junior status in the Graphic Design 
department, or permission of the instructor by port- 
folio review and interview. Students should have 
expertise in QuarkXpress or Aldus PageMaker, 
Adobe Illustrator or A Idus Freehand, and Adobe 
PhotoShop. 

GD326 
Single Image 

3 credits, 6 hours 

The design of a complete publicity unit as 
exemplified in a poster. 
Prerequisite: Junior status in the Graphic Design 
department, or permission of the instructor hy port- 
folio review and interview. 



GD411A I 

Design Studio I 

3 credits, 6 hoiirs [ 

A wide-ranging exploration of the connections 
between image and text, and symbolic and 
narrative imagery, supported by studies in 
semiotics, information theory, and research 
methodology. Both traditional and computer 
technologies within a thorough research ; 

process are included. Preliminary research and 
definition of a self-generated degree project is 
undertaken by Graphic Design majors in this 
course. 

Prerequisite: Senior status in the Graphic Design 
department, or by permission of the instructor by 
portfolio review and iitterview. Studeius should have 
expertise in QuarkXpress or Aldus PageMaker. 
Adobe Illustrator or Aldus Freehand, and Adobe 
PhotoShop. 

GD 411 B 
Design Studio: 
Senior Degree Project 

3 credits, 6 hours 

A self-generated degree project is developed 
involving research, proposals, complete 
design formulation, and final presentation. 
Topics are reviewed by a panel of faculty in 
Graphic Design, with projects reviewed by an , 
outside critic midway through the preliminary i 
stages of development. This course uses both 
traditional and computer technologies within a \ 
thorough research process. 
Prerequisites: GD 41 1 A andGD4l2A. Students ' 
should have expertise in QuarkXpress or A Idus \ 

PageMaker Adobe Illustrator or Aldus Freehand, ! 
and Adobe PhotoShop. Experience in Macromedia i 
Director is desirable. j 

GD 412 A/B 
Problem Solving 

3 credits, 6 hours 

Develops approaches to solving communica- ' 
tions problems of broad scope and 
increasingly practical application across ' 

varied media formats. Students work within 
technical and time constraints. The course ; 
uses both traditional and computer technolo- 
gies within a thorough research process. 
Prerequisite: Senior status in the Graphic Design 
program, or permission of the instructor by portfolio [ 
review and interview. Expertise in QuarkXpress or 
A Idus PageMaker A dobe Illustrator or A Idus Free 
Freehand, A dobe PhotoShop, and Macromedia j 

Director is necessary. j 



152 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



GD 426 01 
Advanced Typography 

3 credits, 6 hours 

This elective course addresses typography as 
both the primary vehicle to communicate 
information and as a support to images. 
Assignments range from informational design 
to expressive, content-based problems, to intu- 
itive investigations and formal experiments. 
Problems may incorporate both static and 
moving formats, both print and non-print envi- 
ronments. Although traditional methods of 
conceptualizing are used within a thorough 
visual process, extensive computer work is 
involved. 

Prerequisite: Senior stuliis in llie Graphic Design 
department, or permission of the instructor by port- 
folio review and interview: Students should have 
expertise in Quark Xpress or Aldus PageMaker. 
Adobe Illustrator or Aldus Freehand, and Adobe 
PhotoShop. Experience in Macromedia Director is 
desirable. 

GD 426 02 
Advanced Typography 

3 credits, 6 hours 

Focuses on the design of the human experi- 
ence with technology. As designers, our 
processes and principals for shaping 2D and 
3D information and artifacts have improved 
our physical environment and the ways in 
which we communicate. Explores how these 
practices apply to the design of the digital arti- 
fact and the man-machine interface. 
Prerequisite: Senior status in the Graphic Design 
Department, or permission of the instructor by port- 
folio review and interview. Students should have 
expertise in QuarkXpress, Illustrator, PhotoShop, 
and Macromedia Director 

IN 440 

Design Internship 

3 credits, 90 hours/semester 

Open to Graphic Design, Illustration and Industrial 

Design majors only. 



Graduate Seminars 

GR691 

University Seminar: 

Structure and Metaphor 

3 credits, 3 hours 

An interdisciplinary seminar in which students 
from all graduate programs examine theoret- 
ical issues of structure and metaphor in 
relation to art and design. Topics include 
cognition and perception, meaning and repre- 
sentation, and systems of organization and 
expression. 

(May be taken to satisfy Aesthetics and Art 
Criticism corequisites for the MAT program.) 
Graduate students only. 

GR692 

University Seminar: 

Art and Design in Society 

3 credits, 3 hours 

An interdisciplinary seminar in which students 
from all graduate programs examine theoret- 
ical issues relating to the place of art and 
design in society. Topics include the social 
role of the artist/designer, public policy and 
the arts, issues of post-modernism, and aes- 
thetic and ethical implications of emerging 
arts and communications technologies. 
(May be taken to satisfy Sociology/Anthropologv 
corequisites for the MAT program.) 
Graduate students only 

XX 699 

Graduate students may register for upper-level 
undergraduate liberal arts courses and studio 
electives for graduate credit. Graduate stu- 
dents will be expected to contribute at a higher 
level in the classroom and will have additional 
assignments (readings, papers, etc.) in order to 
be granted graduate credit. Students are 
advised to select an area of study that 
broadens or intensifies their background in the 
arts, education, and related disciplines. Often 
this work contributes directly to preparation of 
the graduate project proposal. In order to reg- 
ister for an upper-level undergraduate course 
and receive graduate course credit, the student 
must submit a completed special topics/inde- 
pendent study form to the Office of the 
Registrar. 

GR 791 

University Seminar: Criticism 

3 credits, 3 hours 

An interdisciplinary seminar in which 
advanced graduate students further examine 
the nature of image-making and design with 
particular attention to the theories and applica- 
tions of criticism. 
Prerequisite: GR 692. Graduate students only 



Liberal Arts 



HU 008 A/B 

English as a Second Language I, II 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Prepares students for whom English is a 
second language to produce the kinds of 
writing expected of them on the college level, 
and to improve their reading and critical 
thinking skills. This is a two-semester require- 
ment. HU 008 A provides a review of English 
grammar, sentence stnicture, and paragraph 
development. It focuses primarily on the 
development of fluency in writing and 
reading. The second semester focuses on the 
different kinds of prose techniques and on 
responding in writing to readings and to the 
work of other students. A workshop format 
engages students in collaborative learning 
activities. 

Weekly proctored writing sessions with a 
minimum of 10 essays per semester and 
tutoring sessions are mandatory. Credits for 
HU 008 A or B do not count toward gradua- 
tion. On rare occasions, students may be 
exempted from HU 008 B by the instructor. 
HU 008 A and B are graded on a pass/fail 
basis. A student who successfully completes 
the sequence enters HU 1 10 A. 

HU 009 AND HU 109 B 
First Year Writing 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Designed to help students improve reading, 
writing, and study skills. The emphasis is on 
technical aspects of writing, including 
grammar, punctuation, word usage, and para- 
graph construction, along with reading 
comprehension, vocabulary, and sentence 
structure. Grades in HU 009 are on a pass/fail 
basis only. 

HU 009 credits do not count toward degree 
requirements. 

HU 009 B substitutes for HUIIOA. Students suc- 
cessfully completing HU009B will take HUllOB 
the following semester 

HU 103 A/B 

Introduction to IVIodernism I, II 

3 credits, 3 hours 

A multi-arts viewpoint that explores the his- 
torical and cultural inheritance of the West 
over the last two centuries. The first semester 
concentrates on the period 1776-1914 and 
examines the complex movements known as 
romanticism and realism; the second semester 
covers the next half-century of high mod- 
ernism and its consequences. 
Required of all UArts undergraduates. 
Common Core 



The University of the Ans Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



153 



HU 110 A/B 

First Year Writing I, II 

3 credits. 3 hours 

A year-long writing course, the theme of 
which is "Artists as Writers." Covers the var- 
ious kinds of writing that artists may be 
expected to produce, ranging from infomiai 
generative writing to formal critical analysis, 
and from presentational writing to research. 
The student will write about the arts 
(including the student's own work), the artist, 
and the artmaking process. The first semester 
focuses on the artist and artmaking, and the 
second semester on the various arts-visual 
arts, dance, music, theater, multimedia, and 
literature-regarded from various cultural 
perspectives. 

Required for all UArls undergraduates. 
Common Core 

HU 130 A/B 
French I 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Study of the basic elements of French 

grammar through conversation and drills 

derived from readings of easy modem prose 

and from a cultural reader. 

Humanities 

HU 131 A/B 
German I 

3 credits, 3 hours 

A one-year course of basic grammar The aim 

of the course is to develop the reading, 

writing, and speaking skills of the first-year 

German student. 

Humanities 

HU 132 A/B 
Italian I 

3 credits, 3 hours 

This course covers basic grammar and conver- 
sation about everyday Italian life and culture 
and basic grammar through reading of Italian 
prose. 
Humanities 

HU 140 A 

Art History Survey I 

3 credits, 3 hours 

A survey of Western visual arts (including 
architecture) from the earliest extant examples 
(cave paintings) to the Renaissance. The focus 
will be on ancient Greece and Rome, and 
medieval Europe. The arts will be presented in 
cultural and historical context. 
Discipline History /Humanities 



HU 140 B 

Art History Survey II 

3 credits, 3 hours 

A continuation, from the Renaissance to the 
present day, of the survey of Western visual 
arts begun in HU 140 A. Major styles and 
periods: baroque, romanticism, realism, mod- 
ernism. The arts are presented in cultural and 
historical context. 
Discipline History/Humanities 

HU 162 

Individual and Society 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Examines the concepts of "individual" and 
"society" and how they are related under 
modem social conditions. It treats society and 
social institutions as fundamental realities and 
considers the ways in which social forces 
affect individual personality and identity. It 
provides an introduction to the perspective of 
.sociology as distinct from that of psychology. 
Topics include socialization, social solidarity, 
morality, authority, deviance, individualism, 
and freedom. 
Social Science 

HU 181 A 

Child and Adolescent Psychology 

3 credits, 3 hours 

This course focuses upon Erikson's psychoso- 
cial stages of life from birth to adolescence. 
Major topics include pregnancy, the birth 
process, and the physical, intellectual, emo- 
tional, and social development of the child. 
Family life and parent-child relationships are 
also examined, with particular attention given 
to the impact of our social institutions upon 
parents and children. 
Social Science 

HU 181 B 

Adult Psychology 

3 credits, 3 hours 

This course focuses upon Erikson's psychoso- 
cial crises from adolescence to death. Major 
topics include career choice, human sexuality, 
love, marriage, values, mental health and 
mental illness, aging, and death. 
Social Science 

HU 201 
Lyric Poetry 

3 credits, 3 hours 

A survey of lyric poetry, with particular 

emphasis on a single period or a group of 

poets, e.g., Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, 

Wallace Stevens, Allen Ginsberg, Sylvia Plath, 

and the English Romantics. 

Literature ■ 



HU210A 

19th Century American Writers 

3 credits. 3 hours 

The major ideas and trends in 19th century 

American literature, including works by Poe, 

Hawthome, Melville. Dickinson, and James. 

Literature 

HU 210 B 

20th Century American Writers 

3 credits, 3 hours 

20th century American writers including 

works by Wharton, Lewis, Hemingway, 

Fitzgerald, and Steinbeck. 

Literature 

HU211 
Women Writers 

3 credits, 3 hours 

An examination of literature written by 
women, studied for its uniqueness and, 
equally important, for its significance to the 
mainstream of literature. The course begins 
with such writers as Jane Austen. Emily 
Bronte, and Virginia Woolf, and concludes 
with contemporary writers. 
Literature 

HU 212 

Introduction to Mythology 

3 credits, 3 hours 

This course begins by defining mythmaking 
(a creadve process essential to all sociefies, 
past and present) and by analyzing the dif- 
ferent approaches to myth. It moves on to 
examine creation myths from around the 
world and, finally, a selection of myths from 
different cultures. 
Lileralure 

HU213 
World Drama 

3 credits. 3 hours 

This course examines some of the most 
important periods in dramatic literature before 
the modern period, in both the Westem and 
non-Westem traditions; Classical Greece and 
Rome, India of Kalidasa, Medieval Europe, 
Japan (Noh and Kabuki), Renaissance Italy 
and Spain, Neoclassical France, Romantic 
drama, and opera. The relation of drama to 
ritual as a worldwide phenomenon. Emphasis 
on the relarion of dramatic styles to the cul- 
tures and theaters within which they 
developed, and exploration of the idea of 
"total theater" in which poetry, song, dance, 
and music fuse together. 
Literature 



154 



The University of Ihe Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



HU 216 

The Short Story 

3 credits, 3 hours 

A study of the short story from Poe to the 
present. Samplings from the British, the 
Americans, and the Europeans, with particular 
attention to the major authors who reinvented 
the genre. At the end of the semester, students 
look at developments in contemporary fiction: 
the anti-story, the new wave, the surreal, the 
minimal, the funny, the mythic. 
Literature 

HU 217 

African-American Literature 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Examines the role of the African-American 
writer in American society through writers 
like Langston Hughes, Richard Wright, Ralph 
Ellison, James Baldwin, Toni Morrison. 
Imamu Baraka, and Gwendolyn Brooks, who 
have made major contributions to American 
literature and culture. 
Literature 

HU 218 
Superheroes 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Examines the most important heroes of pop- 
ular culture in the Middle Ages-Beowulf, 
Roland, Siegfried, and King Arthur. What do 
these heroes and the epics in which they 
appear reveal about their culture? How do they 
compare to modem popular superheroes? 
Literature 

HU 219 

Children's Literature 

3 credits, 3 hours 

The anonymous oral traditions of world 
literature, which continue to nurture the 
imagination and sense of identity of children 
today, and the modem tradition of children's 
literature. The course focuses on children's lit- 
erature as an introduction to the principles and 
forms of art and to the role of the imagination 
in child development. 
Literature 



HU 221 

Forms of Autobiography 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Intimate, revelatory explorations of the many 
worlds of the self; Hemingway as a young 
writer in Paris meeting Fitzgerald, Stein, 
Picasso; Salinger as Holden Caulfield, preppy 
sage; Freud on himself on psychoanalysis; 
Roth's Portnoy complaining in the throes of 
lust; Proust's great theories of love, death, and 
art; Van Gogh as artist and moral thinker in his 
letters; Greene's portrait of a woman's obses- 
sion with love and God; Andre Malraux's 
Lazams; Tillie Olsen's stmggles to write as a 
housewife; and others. Readings from letters 
and diaries by the authors of the books. 
Literature 

HU 230 A/B 
French II 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Open to students who have completed French 

1 or have had two or more years of high school 

French. Modem French short stories and a 

novel. La Priiicesse de Cleves, by the 18th 

century writer Mme. de la Fayette. 

Humanities 

HU 232 A/B 
Italian II 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Open to students who have completed Italian I 

or have had two or more years of high 

school Italian. 

Hitmanities 

HU 240 
Ancient Art 

3 credits, 3 hours 

An investigation of the art and architecture of 
the ancient world, concentrating on the clas- 
sical art of Greece and Rome, but also 
considering the arts of Mesopotamia and 
Egypt. 
Humanilies/A rl History 

HU 241 
Medieval Art 

3 credits, 3 hours 

The sculpture, architecture, painting, and dec- 
orative arts of Europe from the early Christian 
period in the third century A.D. to the proto- 
Renaissance in Italy in the 14th century, 
observing the emergence and flowering of a 
northern European mystical Christian vision 
separate from the monumental classical vision 
of Greece and Rome. 
Humanities/Art History 



HU 242 A 

Northern Renaissance Art 

3 credits, 3 hours 

The painting of the late Gothic illuminators 
and the 14th century German and Flemish 
Mannerists such as Cranach, Bmeghel, and 
Bosch. Students investigate the complex sym- 
bolism of northern iconography, the new 
techniques developed, and the historical back- 
ground of a style often called 
Northern Realism, 
Humunities/A it History 

HU 242 B 

Italian Renaissance Art 

3 credits, 3 hours 

The major figures in the artistic centers of 

Italy from Giotto in the 14th century to the 

early work of Michelangelo at the end of the 

15th century. The architects, sculptors, and 

painters of Florence are the focus, but artists 

in Venice, Padua, and Rome are discussed as 

well. 

Humanities/Art History 

HU 243 
Baroque Art 

3 credits, 3 hours 

The works of the major European artists of the 
17th century: Bemini, Rubens, Velasquez, 
Rembrandt, Poussin, and Vermeer Through 
the genres of landscape, still life, and portrai- 
ture, all mature by the 17th century; other 
artists such as Hobbema, Ruisdael, Zurbaran, 
and Hals are also studied. 
Humanities/Art History 

HU244 

Mythology in Oriental Art 

3 credits. 3 hours 

An introduction to the symbolism of 
mythology in Oriental art. The course investi- 
gates myths in the major Oriental cultures and 
their basic patterns, functions, and meanings. 
HumanitiesIA rl History 

HU 245 A/B 

History of Western Architecture I, II 

3 credits, 3 hours 

In the first semester, this course surveys the 
development of Western architecture from the 
ancient world of the Greeks and the Romans 
through the Renaissance to the end of the 19th 
century. In the second semes" ■, emphasis is 
on the 20th century. This course should be 
taken in sequence; the second semester 
assumes knowledge of the first semester's 
work. 
Humanities/Art History 



The University of tiie Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



155 



HU246 

19th Century Art 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Painting and sculpture made in the modern 
age in the West are examined in an interna- 
tional context. Emphasis is on the worics of 
the major French, English, German, and 
American artists. The variety of subjects these 
artists explored and the new styles they devel- 
oped as they responded to the world of the 
19th century will be among the topics 
discussed. 
Humanities/Art History 

HU 248A 
Film History 

3 credits, 3 hours 

A survey of the history of film. Categories of 
films to be screened include: early film forms 
(Lumiere, Griffith, and De Mille); Dada and 
Surrealist influences (Leger, Bunuel. Marx 
Brothers, and Resnais); the impact of 
Constructivism and the Machine Aesthetic 
(Eisenstein, Vertov, and Chaplin); German 
Expressionist influence on Hollywood (Ford, 
Welles, Wyler, and Hitchcock); modem 
European and American films (Bergman, 
Godard, Kubrick, and Altman); and avant- 
garde art influences on new American cinema 
(Deren and Brakhage). 
Humanities/Art History 

HU 248B 

Issues in National Cinema 

3 credits, 3 hours 

The course selects films from modem 
European and emerging national cultures that 
demonstrate both their interactions with post- 
modern politics, theory and culture, and the 
development of an alternative discourse to 
Hollywood commercial filmmaking. Films are 
selected from the following: 1920s Soviet 
cinema; Italian Neo-Realism; anthropological 
documentaries; French New Wave; 
postwar/holocaustal cinema in Europe; other 
national cinemas (Spain, Hungary, Japan, 
etc.); anti-colonialist struggles in films from 
India, Egypt, Argentina, Chile, Brazil, 
Senegal, and Cuba; and new women film- 
makers. 
Humanities/Art History 



HU250 

History of Sculpture 

3 credits, 3 hours 

A chronological survey of three-dimensional 

art produced from the end of the 18th century 

to the present day. Works by major artists from 

Europe and the United States-including 

Auguste Rodin, Pablo Picasso, Alexander 

Calder, David Smith, Louise Nevelson, and 

Christo-will be discussed and compared to the 

works of 

earlier artists. 

Discipline History IHiitnanitiesI Art History 

HU 251 

History of Industrial Design 

3 credits, 3 hours 

A survey of industrial design in the West, 

paying particular attention to developments in 

the 20th century. 

Discipline History IHiimanitiesI A rt History 

HU253 
History of Crafts 

3 credits, 3 hours 

A survey of the principal movements and ten- 
dencies in Western crafts since the middle of 
the 19th century. Main topics include the arts 
and crafts movement; art nouveau; the 
Bauhaus; the interrelationships among fine 
arts, crafts, and design; and postmodernism. 
Required of all Crafts majors. 
Discipline History /Humanities/Art History 

HU 254 

History of Communication Design 

3 credits, 3 hours 

A survey of two-dimensional design in the 
West, with particular attention to develop- 
ments in the 20th century. 
Required of all Graphic Design majors. 
Discipline History IHumaititiesI Art History 

HU 255 

History of Photography 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Provides an introduction to the significant 
photographers and their work in the history of 
the medium; describes technical developments 
and their impact; discusses the major visual 
and aesthetic trends in the development of 
photography and their relationship to art in 
general; describes the larger social context in 
which photography has developed. 
Required of all Photography ttwjors. 
Discipline History /Humanities 



HU259 
Listening to Music 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Examines the unique role assigned to the lis- 
tener of music and addresses the special skills 
expected of an informed audience. Ranging 
between the hows and whys of listening, dis- 
cussion introduces students to some of the 
strategies composers use to organize their 
thoughts, including concepts of variation, 
development, and non-verbal narration. 
Humanities 

HU 260 A 
Human Origins I 

3 credits, 3 hours 

An anthropological perspective on the evolu- 
tion, biology, ecology, and behavior of 
nonhuman primates from protosimians to great 
apes. Students are introduced to the principles 
of evolution and adaptive trends. The course 
focuses on the successful terrestrial species of 
Old World monkeys and on the apes — the 
gibbon, orangutan, gorilla, and chimpanzee. 
Comparisons are made among nonhuman pri- 
mates and our own species regarding diet, 
locomotion, tool use and manufacuire, modes 
of communication, social behavior and social 
systems, motherhood and child care, aggres- 
sion, "cultural" behavior, and recent trends in 
nonhuman primate behavior studies. Films are 
an important part of the course. 
Social Science 

HU 260 B 
Human Origins II 

3 credits, 3 hours 

An introduction to human biological and cul- 
tural evolution, a survey of the major 
evolutionary stages in hominid evolution, an 
introduction to Paleolithic technologies, and a 
comparison of contemporary Stone Age soci- 
eties with Paleolithic populations. 
Social Science 

HU261 
Observing Humans 

3 credits, 3 hours 

This course presents several different social 
science frameworks and seeks to uncover what 
can be learned about human behavior by 
people watching. Students will choose places 
for brief weekly observation and use their own 
art skills to document what they see. 
Social Science 



156 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



HU262 
History of China 

3 credits, 3 hours 

The time span is from the earliest days to the 
present, with special emphasis on the modem 
period and relations with the United States 
and other Western powers. Intellectual and 
cultural developments will take precedence 
over political and economic history. 
Social Science 

HU 262 B 
History of Japan 

3 credits, 3 hours 

The time span is from the earliest days to the 
present, with special emphasis on the modern 
period and relations with the United States 
and other Western powers. Intellectual and 
cultural developments will take precedence 
over political and economic history. 
Social Science 

HU 263 

The Culture of the Italian 

Renaissance 

3 credits, 3 hours 

A comprehensive study of the political and 
social conditions in Italy from the end of the 
14th until the middle of the 16th centuries that 
led to the artistic and philosophical flowering 
known as the Renaissance. Not only will the 
contributions of the larger states of Milan, 
Venice, and Florence be explored, but also the 
petty princely courts of Mantua, Ferrara, and 
Urbino. Reading Machiavelli's The Prince and 
portions of Catiglione's The Courtier is an 
essential part of the course. 
Social Science 

HU 264 

Modern American History 

3 credits, 3 hours 

A study of contemporary developments, 

values, and issues as a product of 20th century 

phenomena. The course explores the dramatic 

changes that have occurred in American 

society over the last 50 years. 

Social Science 

HU265 

Introduction to Folklore 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Introduces folklore genres and the history of 

folklore study. Sacred objects, fairy tales, 

songs, parodies, and legends will be analyzed 

and presented in class. 

Social Science 



HU 266 A 

History ofthe Classical World 

3 credits, 3 hours 

The history of ancient civilizations in the Near 
East and Europe. Egyptian, Greek, and Roman 
history, religion, philosophy, and culture. 
Readings from selected ancient texts and 
slides of art works illuminate the culture of 
these civilizations and provide links with the 
present world. 
Social Science 

HU 266 B 

History of Medieval Europe 

3 credits, 3 hours 

The history of medieval Europe from the 
Germanic settlements to the establishment of 
Christianity and the feudal social expansion of 
the late Middle Ages are important topics for 
the course. A wide range of readings and the 
use of examples of medieval art promote a 
broad interpretation of this period. 
Social Science 

HU 267 

Introduction to Cultural 

Anthropology 

3 credits, 3 hours 

The nature of and variation in human cultures 
and the various theories (historical, functional, 
and symbolic) that explain them. This survey 
of culture in both Western and non-Western 
societies considers a number of special topics 
such as language and society; cultural identity 
and the arts; gender, marriage and family; and 
social ranking and power relations. The 
impact of globalization, tourism, and cultural 
change are also considered. 
Social Science 

HU268 

Introduction to the Bible 

3 credits, 3 hours 

The main themes of the Bible are explored 
from a modem, critical, nondenominational 
point of view. No knowledge of the Bible is 
assumed. Using historical and literary 
analysis, continuities as well as differences 
between the Hebrew and Christian testaments 
are examined. 
Social Science 



HU270 

Introduction to Aesthetics 

3 credits, 3 hours 

An introduction to the philosophy of art. After 
a brief examination of analytic, philosophical 
methods and the history of aesthetics, a con- 
sideration of some of the fundamental 
problems in aesthetics, such as the intention of 
the artist, the physical object/aesthetic object 
distinction, and the nature and comparison of 
different kinds of media. The relationship 
between language and art is central to the 
course. 
Humanities 

HU272 
Money Matters 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Explores issues in economics and business by 
working out from the roles and interests of 
individual agents and groups. We will look at 
economic dynamics in artistic and cultural 
work in the present, and at different historical 
moments, to explore further the nature of 
these relationships and their meanings. 
Students are exposed to economic and busi- 
ness discourse, provided with a broad and 
intensive understanding of economic and busi- 
ness language and logic, given experience in 
the application of these concepts to issues in 
their field of interest, and provided with a 
foundation for thinking through the economic 
and ethical dimensions of their work. 
Social Science 

HU 274 

Introduction to Philosophy 

3 credits, 3 hours 

A course specifically tailored to students with 
no experience in reading philosophy. Several 
basic issues are considered, including 
freedom, God, morality, death, mind, appear- 
ance, and reality. In addition to brief readings 
of primary sources, readings of discussions of 
these issues along with innovative fiction 
illustrating salient points. 
Humanities 

HU281 
Dynamic Anatomy 

3 credits, 3 hours 

The stmcture of the body as it relates to form 
(size, shape, and proportion) and support (pos- 
ture, position, and movement). In-depth 
exploration of the location, orientation, and 
actions of major muscle groups, joints, and 
bones, and how they differ by gender through 
the life cycle. 
Science/Math 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



157 



HU 282 A 

Fundamentals of College 
Mathematics 

3 credits, 3 hours 

An introduction to the fundamental mathemat- 
ical principles and operations used in 
undergraduate courses in the physical and 
social sciences. Topics include sets, logic, 
probability, statistics, number theory, algebra, 
and geometry. 
SciencelMath 

HU 282 B 
Calculus 

3 credits, 3 hours 

An introduction to calculus emphasizing the 
applications of differential and integral cal- 
culus to the physical and social sciences. 
Prerequisite: HU282A. equivalent college-level 
mathematics, or pre-coUege advanced algebra and 
geometry. 
SciencelMath ' ■ ■ 

HU283 
Probability 

3 credits, 3 hours 

This class introduces some of the most funda- 
mental ideas in classical probability. Polling 
techniques, casino gambling, weather fore- 
casting, and lotteries are a few areas in which 
the principles of probability directly influence 
our lives. Modern science depends on proba- 
bility to build mathematical descriptions of the 
real world. This course explores the concepts 
of probability in an intuitive and accessible 
way, understandable to beginners. Topics 
include sample spaces, counting, conditional 
probability, and the concept of independence, 
game, theory, random variables, and the law of 
large numbers, 
ScieitcelMath 

HU 285 A 
Life Sciences 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Life forms in the context of current adapta- 
tions and evolutionary history. Special 
emphasis is placed on an exploration of 
evolutionary relationships, ecological special- 
ization, and the dynamic relationships of 
organisms in an integrated ecosystem. 
SciencelMath 



HU 285 B 
Physical Sciences 

3 credits. 3 hours 

An investigation of astronomy, geology, and 
other physical sciences. Topics include the 
origin of the universe and solar system, the 
nature of matter and energy, and the parame- 
ters of physical science. Provides a 
background for understanding the impact of 
science on human values. 
SciencelMath 

HU286 

Science and Pseudoscience 

3 credits. 3 hours 

The methods and issues of contemporary sci- 
ence. Explores how scientific information is 
used in society through an examination of sci- 
entific, near-scientific, and pseudoscientific 
claims, including strange creatures like 
Bigfoot and the Loch Ness monster, miracle 
cures for diseases, and paranormal phe- 
nomena. The question of how funding might 
affect scientific research is also examined. 
SciencelMath 

HU 288 

Introduction to Brain, Mind, 

and Behavior 

3 credits, 3 hours 

This course is an introduction to the organiza- 
tion of the brain and nervous system and to 
their interactions with other body systems that 
produce observable behavior. Topics include 
brain structure and function, neurological 
changes over the life cycle, and the effects of 
malfunctions. Students will learn about spe- 
cific brain structures and how they contribute 
to or produce specific behavioral characteris- 
tics. We will explore learning, memory, the 
senses, and sex differences in the brain, as 
well as other current topics of interest, 
SciencelMath 

HU289 

Contemporary Issues in Life 

Sciences 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Each semester this course explores one area of 
current research in the life sciences by 
focusing on three significant issues in the cur- 
rent scienfific literature. Students participate 
in a series of semi-independent inquiry activi- 
ties. For each research issue, student teams 
complete a "challenge" that demonstrates their 
ability to understand, collect, interpret, and 
apply appropriate information in order to pro- 
pose solutions and to convince classmates of 
the success of their approaches. 
Science IMath 



HU292 

Introduction to World Religions 

3 credits, 3 hours 

An exploration of world religious traditions 
originating in Africa, the Americas. China. 
India. Japan, and the Middle East. Religions 
are studied in their historical and cultural con- 
text, including their development in various 
times and places, and their beliefs regarding 
the cosmos, society, the self, and good and 
evil. 
Social Science 

HU 293 

Dance & Expressive Culture 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Dance is woven into the mythology, theater, 
music, poetry, and literature of many cultures. 
The course will consider dance as it has influ- 
enced and has been influenced by these forms 
of creative expression in the Western worid. 
Humanities 

HU 310 

The Stories of Chel<hov 

3 credits, 3 hours 

The readings include most of Chekhov's best 
stories, excerpts from his letters, some critical 
interpretations, and supplementary material on 
family life. Consideration of the literary 
merits of his stories and exploration of what 
goes on between the people in them. 
Literature 

HU 311 
Greek Drama 

3 credits. 3 hours 

Plays by Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, and 
Aristophanes are examined to understand their 
own integrity as works of art and to develop 
an appreciation of the extraordinary achieve- 
ment of Greek drama. 
Literatin-e 

HU313 

Poetry Writing Workshop 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Students' poems are discussed, criticized, 
revised, and improved. Principles governing 
the decision to change a poem in various 
ways, the study of poems by American and 
English poets, the reading of some criticism, 
and concentration on the basic principles of 
craft are all included. Theories involve sound, 
content, meaning, and purpose of student 
poems and of poetry in general. The poet's 
sense of an audience also figures in the 
discussion. 
Literatiu-elHwnanities 



158 



The University of the Art.s Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



HU 314 
Literature and Film 

3 credits, 3 hours 

This course explores different subjects 

through the arts of literature and film. Among 

the topics treated have been images of 

Vietnam, the thriller, and science fiction. 

Literature 

HU315A 
Modern Drama 

3 credits, 3 hours 

A study of the modem theater from the end of 
the 19th century to the present. Students will 
read some of the world's best playwrights: 
Ibsen, Strindberg, Chekhov, Shaw, Pirandello, 
Lorca, Brecht, and Beckett. Theater trips are 
part of the experience of this course. 
Literature 

HU 315 B 
Contemporary Drama 

3 credits, 3 hours 

A study of the experimental developments in 
today's theater, both on Broadway and off, 
from Waiting for Godot to the present 
moment. Students will read some of the best 
known playwrights of our time; Genet, 
Beckett, lonesco, Albee, Pinter, and Shepard, 
as well as some not so well known. Theater 
trips are part of the experience of this course. 
Literature 

HU 316 

American Playwriglits 

3 credits. 3 hours 

A study of the American theater in the past 50 

years, looking at the works of such authors as 

O'Neill, Miller, Williams, Albee, and Shepard. 

Theater trips as well as showings of filmed 

plays are part of this course. 

Literature . . 

HU317A 
Romanticism 

3 credits, 3 hours 

A study of the Romantic movement in 
England, including the major poets (Blake, 
Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and 
Keats), several novelists (including Bronte's 
Wiitheriiig Heights and Mary Shelley's 
Frankenstein), and samplings from letters and 
essays. Some of the dominant Romantic 
themes-the artist as outcast, revolution, man's 
relation to nature-will be addressed. 
Literature 



HU318 

Literature of tlie Roman Empire 

3 credits, 3 hours 

After a glance at Greek influences, the course 
will focus on the literature of classical Rome. 
Readings from epic, drama, and lyric forms, 
with an emphasis on the interaction between 
those classical forms and the culture that 
produced them. 
Literature 

HU 320 A 

Western Literary Masterpieces I 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Works from antiquity through the Middle 
Ages that form the foundation of Western lit- 
erature. Focuses on the creation of character, 
the structure and form of the works, and the 
perspectives and values they reveal. Examines 
the questions asked by different cultures and 
how human potential, fate, and reality are 
defined. 
Literature 

HU 320 B 

Western Literary Masterpieces II 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Works from the Renaissance through the 
Neoclassical periods that form the foundation 
of Western literature. Focuses on the creation 
of character, on structure and form, but also on 
tone (humor, parody, satire, and irony) and the 
perspectives and the values the works reveal. 
Literature 

HU322 
Scriptwriting 

3 credits, 3 hours 

This workshop course introduces students to 
the discipline of writing for theater and film. 
Focusing on the elements necessary for the 
creation of producable scripts, the student 
develops practical skills leading to the cre- 
ation of a short work for stage or screen by the 
end of the semester. 
Humanities 

HU323 
Arts Criticism 

3 credits. 3 hours 

A writing course designed to promote under- 
standing and interpretation of the arts across a 
multidisciplinary spectrum and to provide stu- 
dents with the basic tools of critical analysis. 
Group discussion and selected 
readings. 
Humanities 



HU325 
Fiction Writing 

3 credits, 3 hours 

A workshop course on writing short fiction. 
Students will study the elements of creative 
writing, experiment with several forms, 
develop a clear voice, and learn how to criti- 
cize the work of others usefully. The goal is to 
produce a portfolio of finished pieces. 
Humanities 

HU326 

Contemporary Arts in America 

3 credits. 3 hours 

A continuation of the two-semester 
Modernism sequence, this course focuses pri- 
marily on contemporary literature (mainly 
plays and novels) and contemporary visual art 
(mainly painting and sculpture), with occa- 
sional forays into music. Investigation, by 
studying primary sources, of the way various 
works of art express the contemporary aes- 
thetic in America. 
Literature 

HU342 
Artsof Ciiina 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Painting, sculpture, architecture, and decora- 
tive arts from the Neolithic period ( 1 6th 
century B.C.) to the Ching dynasty (18th cen- 
tury A.D.). Special emphasis on Shang bronze 
ware. Han and T'ang sculpture, and Sung and 
Ching pottery. The various styles are related to 
their historical, religious, and social back- 
ground, with particular attention paid to the 
impact of Confucianism. Taoism, and 
Buddhism on Chinese art and architecture. 
From time to time. Eastern and Western cul- 
tures will be compared to understand better 
the similarities and differences between them. 
Humanities/Art History 

HU343 
Art of Venice 

3 credits, 3 hours 

An emphasis on light, an apparent spontaneity 
of organization, and a delight in richness and 
sensuality guided the development of painting 
in Venice from Bellini through Tiepolo. The 
course presents Venetian painting from the 
mid- 15th to the later 18th century, pausing to 
focus especially on the art of Titian, Veronese, 
and Tintoretto, and themes peculiar to 
Venetian art: the female figure poesia; 
Venetian light and landscape; portraiture; 
courtiers, humanists, and beauties; the confra- 
ternity narratives; and the fresco decoration of 
the Venefian villas. 
Humanities /Art History 



The University of the Aits Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



159 



HU344 
Avant-Garde Cinema 

3 credits, 3 hours 

An examination of the arts of experimental 
film and video. The exploration of mental 
states, visual metaphors, process, and non-tra- 
ditional forms and structures are central to the 
course. In addition, the focus is on the co-exis- 
tence of avant-garde film and video with their 
commercial counterparts. Also examines film 
and video language in relation to other art 
languages. 
Htimaiiilies/Arl History 

HU345 

Modern Architecture 

3 credits, 3 hours 

The course investigates modem architecture, 

its theoretical premises, and the social context 

that generated it. Students will also inquire 

into modem architecture's legacy: postmodem 

architecture. 

HumanhieslArt History 

HU 346 

Foll< Art and Architecture 

3 credits, 3 hours 

A survey of American vernacular art and 
architecture, with special attention to the 
eastern United States. Comparisons will be 
made to the ethnic traditions from which this 
architecture springs, principally English and 
German. Social considerations, including 
those of gender, occupation, and religion, will 
be discussed. 
Humanities/Art History 

HU 347 
Arts of Africa 

3 credits. 3 hours , 

Artistic, religious, sociological, and geo- 
graphic aspects of societies in sub-Saharan 
Africa are studied in order to establish conti- 
nuity as well as distinction between their art 
forms. Black American folk art, an extension 
and transformation of African art, is analyzed. 
Humanities/Art History 

HU 348 

American Art to 1945 

3 credits, 3 hours 

A survey of American art, architecture, and 
design, emphasizing the 19th and 20th cen- 
turies. The material is divided into a series of 
secfions or themes and is considered in rela- 
tion to tradition. Each section or theme is 
studied through the work of the major artists 
who best represent it. 
Humanities/Art History 



HU349 

American Film Genres 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Considers various film genres and styles in 

American cinema, such as comedy, film noir, 

the Westem, the musical, and the American 

independent film. 

Humanities/Art History 

HU 351 
Electronic Video 

3 credits, 3 hours 

The history of video as an art form from the 
eariy 1960s to the present. Basic film concepts 
are reviewed in their application to emerging 
new electronic formats. Video art is examined 
in all of its aspects-as computer art. installa- 
tion, and sculpture. The survey explores the 
variety of styles, genres, and forms that consti- 
tute the distinctive achievement of American 
video art. The videotapes and documentation 
of artists' projects are examined and placed 
within the social and cultural context in which 
they were produced. The market forces and 
the political/psychological systems shaping 
the audience and creating an increasingly 
problematic role for artists are important con- 
siderations. 
Humanities 

HU353A 
Impressionism 

3 credits. 3 hours 
The 19th century style known as 
Impressionism is often considered to be the 
foundation of European modem art. The 
course chronologically invesdgates 
Impressionism in its historical and cultural 
context. The technical and conceptual ideas 
that underlie its development will also 
be considered. 
Humanities/Art History 

HU 353 B 
Post-Impressionism 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Post-Impressionism is chronologically investi- 
gated with respect to its historical, cultural, 
and aesthetic context. The technical and 
philosophical concepts that underlie Post- 
Impressionism's development are also 
explored. 
Humanities/Art History 



HU354 
Women Artists 

3 credits. 3 hours 

A chronological survey of professional female 
painters and sculptors active in Westem 
Europe and the United States, from the 16th 
century to the present. The role played by 
women artists in eariier ages, other nations, 
and different media will also be examined. 
Humanities/Art History 

HU 355 

Dada and Surrealism 

3 credits. 3 hours 

The history of the post-Worid War I antira- 
tional movements of dada and surrealism. 
Since these were literary and political as well 
as artistic movements, attention is given to 
texts by such authors as Artaud, Breton, 
Freud, Jarry, Rimbaud, and Tzara, as well as 
to works of visual art. 
Humanities/Art History 

HU 357 
Modern Art 

3 credits. 3 hours 

At the beginning of the 20th century, artists 
responded to new technological forces and the 
pressures of mass culture in styles such as 
cubism, constructivism, and surrealism- styles 
that are still being explored by our contempo- 
raries. The course surveys the period 
1880-1980. emphasizing the continuity of the 
modern artist's situation and role. 
Humanities/Art History 

HU359 

Politics and the Media 

3 credits. 3 hours 

This course analyzes how political and social 
forces interact with the American community 
and how that interaction affects govemment 
stmcture and policy. Factors such as popula- 
tion profiles, "suburbanites." elite groups, 
public opinion, party organization, elecfions, 
and reform movements are studied. 
Social Science 

HU 360 A 

Renaissance and Reformation 

3 credits, 3 hours 

The intellectual and cultural explosion that 
heralded the modem era in Westem civiliza- 
tion. Political, economic, philosophical, 
religious, and cultural developments. 
Social Science 



160 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



HU 360 B 

Age of Enlightenment 

3 credits. 3 hours 

The dramatic intellectual revolution of the 
Age of Science and the applications of the 
revolution to every province of human experi- 
ence. The Enlightenment and the French 
Revolution, which are also part of the trans- 
formation of Europe, are studied from the 
perspective of their consequences for the 
modem world. 
Social Science 

HU 361 

Islam: Religion and Culture 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Examines Islamic culture as it is refracted in 
various religious and literary texts by Muslims 
from Arabia. Iran (Persia), and India as well as 
North America. Begins with discussions of the 
centrality of prophecy and scripture in Islam, 
followed by a perusal of Islamic theology and 
mysticism, and ends with a sampling of pri- 
marily literary prose and poetry pieces that 
provide insights into the multifarious facets of 
Islamic civilization. 
Social Science 

HU 362 A/B 
American Civilization 

3 credits. 3 hours 

An in-depth study of the origins of American 
society with an emphasis on the particular 
political, social, and cultural patterns that 
shaped the course of American development. 
The first semester surveys the process of set- 
tlement, colonial societies, independence, the 
growth of the egalitarian spirit, and the Civil 
War. The second semester studies American 
society in the modem period. From the per- 
spective of today, the course examines the 
legacy of Reconstruction, the Industrial 
Revoludon. the Reform Movements, the 
World Wars, and the Cold War. The factors in 
the past that have shaped contemporary 
society are stressed. 
Social Science 

HU363 
Modern Culture 

3 credits, 3 hours 

This course examines the nature of expressive 
culture (media and art) and its role in contem- 
porary society. A key question is why we use 
expressive culture and how it affects us. 
Topics include high versus popular culture; 
relations between culture, politics and com- 
merce; and the place of censorship in a Uberal 
society. 
Social Science 



HU364 
Sociology of Art 

3 credits. 3 hours 

An examination of the relationships that exist 
between art and society. Focus on the social 
influences that shape the creation and recep- 
tion of artistic works. Topics include the social 
role of the artist; art as a socially organized 
form of work; the social institutions of artistic 
production, transmission, and audience recep- 
tion; and the understanding of art in terms of 
its social context. 
Social Science 

HU 365 A/B 

History and Culture of Latin America 

3 credits. 3 hours 

The history and culture of Latin America, 
including indigenous as well as European cul- 
tural sources. National distinctions and 
the origins of modem society in the area 
will be developed. 
Social Science 

HU 366 
The City 

3 credits. 3 hours 

A study of the city in history, the forces that 

shaped its development, and the impact of the 

city on histor\'. The American city from the 

17th century to the present is used as the 

model for this study. 

Social Science 

HU 367 

Eastern Religions 

3 credits. 3 hours 

An exploration of Hinduism, Buddhism. 
Confucianism. Taoism, and Shintoism. Each is 
studied in its historical and cultural context, 
including its development into various forms 
over the years and in different places, and its 
beliefs regarding views of the cosmos, society, 
the self, and good and evil. In addition to a 
text, students read from the literature of each 
religion. 
Social Science 

HU 368 

Sociology of Politics 

3 credits. 3 hours 

The interaction of political, social, economic, 
technological, and cultural forces in American 
society, with their resultant impact on the 
poUtical system. A brief introduction to polit- 
ical science is incorporated eariy in the 
semester. Factors such as population profiles, 
"suburbanites," elite groups, party organiza- 
tion, elections, and reform movements are 
considered. 
Social Science 



HU369 
Cultural Ecology 

3 credits. 3 hours 

An investigation, from the perspective of eco- 
logical anthropology, of the various cultural 
adaptations found in different ecosystems 
such as deserts, grasslands, circumpolar 
regions, tropical and temperate forests, and 
high-altitude and urban areas. These adapta- 
tions include hunting and gathering, fishing, 
and agriculture. In these examples various atti- 
tudes toward the environment, the impact of 
population growth, and the effect of con- 
flicting technologies on resources are 
considered. 
Social Science 

HU370 

Greek Philosophy 

3 credits. 3 hours 

After examining fragments from pre-Socratic 
philosophers, we consider the writings of 
Plato, including three or four dialogues and 
The Republic. Selections from Aristotle's writ- 
ings on physics, the soul, and aesthetics. 
Humanities 

HU371 

The American Suburbs 

3 credits. 3 hours 

Increasingly, the United States has become a 
suburban nation, with more and more of its 
people living and working in the suburbs. This 
course will examine how suburbs began in the 
late 19th century, how they have evolved, and 
what they are like today. Students will do 
fieldwork. 
Social Science 

HU372 

Continental Philosophy and 

Existentialism 

3 credits. 3 hours 

Examined as a Westem altemative to the ana- 
lytic method. Following some historical 
background, the work of a major existentialist 
philosopher, such as Martin Heidegger, is 
explored. 
Humanities 

HU373 
Ethics 

3 credits. 3 hours 

The history of ethics and the fundamental eth- 
ical problems that have concemed 
philosophers for the past 2.500 years. The 
study begins with Plato and Aristotle and 
extends to contemporary analytic philosophy, 
phenomenology, and existentialism. Problems 
include the "is/ought" distinction, the ultimate 
objective of life, religious issues, human 
rights, justice, and welfare. 
Humanities 



Ttie University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalos 2003/2004 



161 



HU374 

Personality and Creativity 

3 credits. 3 hours 

Through readings of works of major theorists 
on the nature of personality and creativity, the 
course poses two major questions: "What do 
major theorists have to say about the human 
personahty?" and "What do major theorists 
have to say about what it means to be a cre- 
ative person?" There are a number of ways of 
answering these questions and it is not the 
purpose of the course to choose the "best" 
answer, but rather, to put the student in a 
better position to malce his/lier own decisions. 
Social Science 

HU377 

Critical Theory and the Arts 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Since the 1960s, the arts have been influenced 
by "critical theory," a term loosely designating 
new developments in linguistics, philosophy, 
and humanistic study. Unlike traditional inter- 
ests in a work of art's formal properties, 
antecedents, or author, critical theory investi- 
gates the artwork as a text: an interlocking 
series of messages, themes, and codes. 
Investigating those themes, critical theory sees 
in art texts everything from messages about 
class, race, and gender to encoded forms of 
power and desire. The class will consider the 
reception of these critical ideas by artists 
throughout the '70s. '80s, and '90s. 
Social Science IHumanities 

HU 381 
Urban Wildlife 

3 credits. 3 hours 

As humans modify natural habitats and 
expand our population, we increasingly 
encounter wild animals in "our" environ- 
ments. In some cases, these encounters result 
from destruction of natural habitats for these 
animals; in other cases, we have created 
"greenspaces" that actively attract other 
species. This course examines the ways in 
which humans and other animals interact in 
shared and contiguous environments ba.sed on 
semi-independent field studies carried out by 
students on selected species. After an intro- 
duction to common species and a short period 
of directed study, teams of students will plan, 
carry out, and analyze one short-term (four- 
week) study on one species that inhabits urban 
Philadelphia. 
SciencelMath 



HU382 

Social Psychology 

3 credits, 3 hours 

An introduction to the field of social psy- 
chology and an examination of contemporary 
life in America through its social institutions: 
education, criminal justice, media, commu- 
nity, and family, and the social problems that 
have emerged since the 1940s. Significant cur- 
rent events that illuminate these social 
problems are incorporated into the course- 
work. 

Prerequisite: HU181A or B. 
Social Science 

HU383 

Personality and Adjustment 

3 credits, 3 hours 

The study of personality and the patterns of 
behavior and predispositions that determine 
how a person will perceive, think, feel, and 
act. The inner life of men and women, the 
quality of their character, their adjustment to 
their social milieu, and their potentialities for 
self-fulfillment are all explored. Special atten- 
tion is given to adjustment problems of artists 
in work and in love. 
Social Science 

HU 384 

Abnormal Psychology 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Human development and abnormal psy- 
chology: ego defenses, emotional disorders, 
therapeutic theories, and treatment techniques. 
Clinical diagnosis and classificadon of mental 
disorders. 

Prerequisite: HU 1 81 A or B. 
Social Science 

HU 385 

Concepts of Modern Physics 

3 credits. 3 hours 

A survey of important concepts in contempo- 
rary physics. Students participate in 
problem-based exploration of a particular 
theme such as communication, predictions, 
shelter, medicine, and sports. 
SciencelMath 



HU 386 
Human Genetics 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Explores the fundamentals of genetics through 
the study of our own species. Homo sapiens. 
Introduces students to the study of inheritance 
and how molecular, physiological, environ- 
mental, and behavioral mechanisms affect the 
measurable characteristics of humans around 
the world. Topics include genetic diseases and 
unusual physical characterisfics among others. 
Using local resources, students engage in 
problem-solving activities in comparative 
biology. 
Science/Math 

HU388 
Perception 

3 credits, 3 hours 

The structure and function of the senses of 

vision, audition, olfaction, gustation, touch, 

temperature, kinesthesis, time, and the brain 

and nervous system are considered as they 

relate to perception. 

Science/Math 

HU 389 

Evolution in IVIodern Perspective 

3 credits. 3 hours 

Evolution is the unifying theoretical founda- 
tion of all the life sciences. This course 
explores the mechanisms that produce evolu- 
tion and their meaning for our current 
knowledge in biology, conservation, medicine, 
agriculture, and related sciences. Students will 
also consider the effect(s) that society's 
awareness of evolution has had on social insti- 
tutions such as law, literature, politics, and 
education. 
Science/Math 

HU 390 

Mass Media and the Arts 

3 credits, 3 hours 

A wide range of media are examined: televi- 
sion (sit-coms and reality TV), movies 
(comedies and adventure), advertising (print 
and TV), and news (local and national tele- 
casts). An underlying assumption in this 
course is that a key aspect of all media is their 
focus on the production of meaning through 
language, through images, and through tech- 
nology itself. The media is investigated 
through the eyes of contemporary theory in 
order to test the theory's usefulness as a tool in 
understanding media. Students develop a 
variety of critical tools to interpret mass 
media. 
Social Science 



162 



The University of ttie Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



HU 392 

American Musical Tlieater 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Explores aspects and accomplishments of the 

American musical theater from the '20s to the 

'80s. Emphasizes the social, political, and 

psychological elements ranging from 

Gershwin to Sondheim, to offer entertainment 

with a serious message. 

Not open to students who have reeeived credit 

form 3 12 A. 

Humanities 

HU393 
Afro-American Culture 

3 credits, 3 hours 

A survey of some of the most important Afro- 
American contributions to American culture, 
with special attention to the 20th century and 
to the arts. Among those whose work will be 
discussed are W. E. B. DuBois. Duke 
Ellington, Langston Hughes, and Paul 
Robeson. 
Social Science I Humanities 

HU394 

Play, Performance, and Literature 

3 credits, 3 hours 

The focus of this course is the relationship 

between theories of play and performance and 

culture and the arts. The course draws upon 

current thought in anthropology, sociology, art 

criticism, and literary/dramatic performance 

theory (e.g. Barthes, Brecht, Cage, and 

others). 

Humanities ■ 

HU 410 
The Uncanny 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Treats the theme of the uncanny as it has been 
represented principally in literature and the 
visual arts, from Poe and Hoffmann down to 
Kafka and recent cinema. The point of depar- 
ture is Freud's essay on the subject. 
Literature/Humanities 

HU 411 A 
Renaissance Literature 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Works by Boccaccio, Machiavelli, Erasmus, 
Rabelais, Cervantes, Jon,son, Calderon, and 
others are read to explore the remarkable con- 
tribution of these writers and to develop an 
understanding and appreciation of the 
Renaissance. 
Literature 



HU 411 
Shakespeare 

3 credits, 3 hours 

The dramatic works of the supreme writer of 
the English Renaissance-Shakespeare. A 
selection of his comedies, histories, tragedies, 
and romances are read. Focuses on the plays 
not only as literary accomplishments but also 
as theatrical performances existing in three- 
dimensional space. Concerned both with the 
parameters of the original Renaissance stage 
and with modem translations and transforma- 
tions of the plays. 
Literature 

HU412 

Detective Film and Fiction 

3 credits, 3 hours 

An examination of the genre known as hard- 
boiled detective fiction as it developed in 
literature and then was extended by feature 
films. Among the authors to be considered are 
Dashiell Hammett, Raymond Chandler, and 
Ross MacDonald; among the films are The 
Maltese Falcon, The Big Sleep, and The Long 
Goodbye. 
Literature 

HU413 

Literature and Film: From Text to 

Screen 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Explores the conceptual and technical leaps 
between the written text and its transformation 
to a cinematic text on the screen. Students 
examine what happens to plot, characteriza- 
tion, and bound and free description when a 
narrative text is converted to an audiovisual 
presentation. In certain examples, the transfor- 
mation of narrative structure is traced from the 
novel to the screenplay to the finished film. 
Students gain insights into the relafionships 
between written and filmed dialogue, between 
written description and cinematic mise-en- 
scene, between the novel's omniscient narrator 
and the film's voice-over. 
Literature 

HU414A 

The Big, Fat, Famous Novel 

3 credits, 3 hours 

We will read three of the world's best and 
most important novels: Tolstoy's War and 
Peace, Melville's Moby Dick, and Joyce's 
Ulysses. Each provides great pleasure to the 
serious reader and much material for intense 
discussion. Each novel has the equivalent of 
its own little course, about one month long. 
Literature 



HU 414 B 

19th Century Novel 

3 credits. 3 hours 

Study of some of the most admired, best-loved 
books of the world, written in the heyday of 
the novel, the 19th century: Crime and 
Punishment by Dostoevsky, Madame Bovary 
by Flaubert, Wuthering Heights by Bronte, 
Great Expectations by Dickens. Portrait of a 
Lady by James. This is a course for people 
who love to read. 
Literature 

HU 415 A 
Modern Poetry 

3 credits. 3 hours 

Reading and interprefing major American and 
European poets of the late 19th and early 20th 
centuries, such as Yeats. Eliot. Williams, 
Stevens. Rilke. and Montale. Attenfion is 
given to understanding each poet's style and 
its evolution. Aesthetic theory and the function 
of poetry as a social force in the modem worid 
are also discussed. 
Literature 

HU 415 B 
Contemporary Poetry 

3 credits. 3 hours 

Beginning with the Beats, the major schools 
of contemporary poetic practice such as the 
deep image, language/action, confessional 
poetry, new formalism, and projectivism are. 
addressed. The effects of feminism, sexual 
orientation, and racial idenfity on contempo- 
rary poetry are also examined. 
Literature 

HU416A 
Contemporary Novel 

3 credits, 3 hours 

A range of contemporary novels from writers 

who have made an impact since the 1970s. 

Issues of form and style, the relationship of 

the contemporary novel with the past, and the 

nature of narrative are addressed. 

Literature 



Ttie University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



163 



HU417 

Art of Song Lyric 

3 credits, 3 hours 

A study of how contemporary song lyrics 
developed from the tradition of lyric poetry 
and folk ballads. Line-by-line analysis of 
famous lyric poems from literary history will 
be conducted. Popular songs of the past 50 
years are used in the discussion of the prob- 
lems and challenges of putting words to 
music, with special attention paid to Bob 
Dylan. Other artists include Billie Holiday. 
Simon and Garfunkel, the Mamas and the 
Papas, the Rolling Stones. Led Zeppelin, and 
Stevie Wonder. There is a substantial writing 
requirement: students may elect to study 
poetry, librettos, or song lyrics, or to write 
original song lyrics of their own. 
Lilemture 

HU 419 

American Modernists 

3 credits. 3 hours 

In reading and discussing key works of three 
American novelists-Fitzgerald, Hemingway, 
and Faulkner-the student considers to what 
extent and how they reflect such modernist 
concerns as style, language, narrative point of 
view, myth, psychology, and history. In addi- 
tion, students lead discussions of selected 
short fiction by Hemingway and Faulkner sup- 
ported by research into criticism conducted at 
a major research library, and finish the course 
with an essay on one additional major work by 
the writers studied. 
Literature 

HU 420 
Major Writers 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Focuses on the life and work of a single 

important writer. Among the authors who have 

received this intense examination have been 

James Joyce, Samuel Beckett, and Emily 

Dickinson. 

Literature 

HU421 

On tlie Nature of Poetry and Art 

3 credits. 3 hours 

An exploratory course on the nature of poetry 
and art in which a variety of texts will be 
used — literature, philosophy, art, letters, criti- 
cism. We contend with some major figures, 
including Wallace Stevens, Rilke, Eliot, 
Giacometti, Monet, and Van Gogh. 
Contemporary artists such as Sidney 
Goodman. Warren Rohrer, Ray Metzger, and 
Tom Chimes are discussed; some may them- 
selves join in our discussion. 
Literature 



HU 422 

American Politics and Culture: 

1945-1975 

3 credits, 3 hours 

The interaction of politics and culture from 
1945 until 1975. Course materials include fic- 
tion, film, poetry, and journalism. 
Social Science I L iterative 

HU 423 

Literature in Opera of the 20th 

Century 

3 credits, 3 hours 

A study of 20th century opera's treatment of 

major literature. 

Literature 

HU 424 

Latin American Literature 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Latin American literature has had tremendous 
influence not only upon post-war European 
and American literature but upon other arts as 
well. Examines the major exponents of Latin 
American literature. Traces the origins of style 
and shows how Latin Americans began both to 
define themselves and to understand their 
landscape through literature. The focus is on 
the writers of the so-called "boom" who man- 
aged to assimilate the tradition and be 
completely new and original. 
Literature 

HU428 

Portraits of the Artist 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Primarily a literature course, with excursions 
into the visual and musical arts. Explores the 
ways some major artists investigate, in their 
art, what it is to be an artist. Readings/view- 
ings will include: novels by James Joyce. 
Virginia Woolf, and Don DeLillo; plays by 
Samuel Beckett, Sam Shepard, and Stephen 
Sondheim: plus stories, poems, paintings, and 
photographs by various artists; and a film by 
Federico Fellini. 
Literature 

HU 440 

Wagner and the Ring Cycle 

3 credits, 3 hours 

A detailed examination of Richard Wagner's 
gigantic four-opera cycle of music dramas, 
The Ring of the Nibehmgei}. a crowning 
achievement of Romanticism. Wagner's goal 
of combining all the arts remains a funda- 
mental inspiration in film, theater, and 
pertbrmance art today. No previous musical 
training or knowledge is assumed. 
Humanities 



HU442 

Abstract Expressionism 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Abstract Expressionism was the most impor- 
tant movement in post- World War II 
American art. This course surveys its origins, 
accomplishments, and decline. 
HimwnitiesIA rt History 

HU448A 

American Art Since 1945 

3 credits, 3 hours 

In 1945. Worid War II ended and the focus of 
modern art shifted from Paris to New York 
City. The course begins with Abstract 
Expressionism; studies other major American 
styles, such as pop art and minimalism; and 
concludes with postmodernist developments 
such as performance and decoration by artists. 
HumunitieslArt History 

HU 448 B 

European Art Since 1945 

3 credits. 3 hours 

Art since World War II has been dominated by 
the New York market and by the issue of 
abstraction; in Europe, however, artists con- 
tinued to use the human figure as a vehicle for 
social and ethical concerns, and in the last 10 
years their engagement has become a model 
for younger artists in both Europe and 
America. The course examines crafts and 
book arts as well as fine arts; it also makes use 
of plays and films. 
Humanities/A rt History 

HU449 

Diaghilev and the Ballet Russes 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Investigates the role of the impresario Serge 
Diaghilev and his Ballet Russes in both 
shaping and echoing the course of the artistic 
revolution in Paris from 1909-1929. The 
Ballet Russes existed for only 20 years, but in 
that brief period it transformed ballet into a 
vital art, creating such vanguard pieces as 
Firebird, Petrouchka, and L'Apres-Midi d'un 
Faune, and brought to dance the riches of 
other arts as it forged partnerships between the 
most important composers, painters, and poets 
of the day. Special emphasis is placed on the 
interrelationships between various artists, 
composers, choreographers, and writers. 
Humanities 



164 



Ttie University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



HU450 
Arts of India 

3 credits. 3 hours 

Painting, sculpture, and architecture from the 
Indus Valley civilization of the second millen- 
nium B.C. through the different periods of 
Buddhist. Hindu, and Islamic dominance to 
the Rajput painting of the 1 8th century A.D. 
The different art styles are related to their his- 
torical, religious, and social backgrounds. 
HumanitiesIA n History 

HU451 
Arts of Islam 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Architecture, architectural decoration, callig- 
raphy, book illustration, textile, and ceramic 
art of the Middle Eastern countries from the 
beginning of the Islamic era (seventh to 18th 
centuries A.D. ). A study of the impact of 
Islamic religion on the character of Islamic art 
and architecture and various regional styles 
within this unified visual mode of expression. 
From time to time Islamic and Christian cul- 
tures are compared to understand better their 
similarities and differences. 
HumanitieslArl History 

HU452 

Topics in Design 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Topics vary from aesthetic issues, such as the 
significance of organic form, to social issues, 
such as the influence of design on social 
change and the impact of design on the natural 
environment. The areas of design studied also 
vary from tools, furniture, and electronics to 
machinery, transportation, and the design of 
the community. 
HumanitieslArt History 

HU453 
Arts of Japan 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Painting, sculpuire, architecture, and minor arts 
of Japan from the Neolithic period to the 1 8th 
century A.D. The emergence and the develop- 
ment of a unique national style from an art world 
dominated by Chinese influence. The develop- 
ment of painting from the medieval Yamoto-e 
narrative scrolls through the 15th cenOiry. The 
evolution of various architecuiral styles from the 
great Buddhist temples of the seventh cenmry to 
the majestic casdes of the 1 7th century. In sculp- 
hire and pottery, the technical improvements and 
the change of aesthetic values from the Jomon 
andYayoi phases to the porcelains of the 17th 
century are analyzed. A brief historical and social 
background of Japan accompanies the study of 
the various art styles. Special attention is given 
to the influence of Zen Buddhism on Japanese 
culture. 
HumanitieslArt History 



HU456 
Major Artists 

3 credits. 3 hours 

Concentrates on the work of a single artist or a 
group of artists. Among the artists who have 
come under this intense investigation have 
been Donatello, Michelangelo, Rembrandt, 
and Picasso; others may be chosen in the 
future. 
HumanitieslArt History 

HU462 

American Social Values 

3 credits, 3 hours 

The moral foundation of American culture. 
Examines the primary American value orien- 
tations-equality and individualism-and 
compares them with those of other societies: 
considers their relations to religion and polit- 
ical ideologies; and assesses their influence on 
contemporary social issues like moral decline 
and tolerance of differences. 
Social Science 

HU463 

Middle Eastern Arts and Culture 

3 credits. 3 hours 

An introduction to the arts and culture of the 
Middle East through the perspective of anthro- 
pology and art history. Examines design, 
symbols, and techniques of Middle Eastern 
art, particularly painting, architecture, 
ceramics, glassware, textiles, and metal work. 
These arts are examined in their social, cul- 
tural, and historical context, which includes 
the role of the artist and craftsman in Middle 
Eastern society; the influence of Islam on 
ritual and symbol; the influence of environ- 
ment on materials and architecture; 
urban-rural traditions; trade patterns and 
market organization; and diffusion of 
design and materials. 
Social SciencelHumanitieslArt History 

HU 464 

The Holocaust 

3 credits. 3 hours 

The Holocaust is a watershed event in modem 

history. This traumatic episode left indelible 

marks on Western society. It was caused by 

factors that still exist in the worid. Examines 

the history that led to the Holocaust, and 

attempts to understand what happened and 

what meaning it has for us today. 

Social Science . ■ . 



HU 466, HU 467 
Comparative Religion I, II 

3 credits, 3 hours 

A study of the world's major religions through 
their historical development, beliefs, sacred 
literamre, and the works of contemporary 
writers. The tirst semester is concerned with 
Eastern religions such as Hinduism, 
Buddhism, and Taoism; the second semester 
deals with Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. 
Social Science 

HU474 

Contemporary Philosophy 

3 credits. 3 hours 

An examination of some of the problems 
occupying today's philosophers and the strate- 
gies they have devised in approaching them. 
Humanities 

HU 475 

Freud and Mahler 

3 credits. 3 hours 

This course examines and discusses the 'theo- 
ries of Sigmund Freud. All basic areas will be 
included, beginning with his work on dreams 
(c. 1890). aspects of psychoanalysis, the 
nature of the person, and his rather pessimistic 
attitude regarding the prospects for the sur- 
vival of the human species. The class will also 
listen to the work of the great Viennese com- 
poser Gustav Mahler Freud and Mahler were 
not only contemporaries and soul mates, but 
Mahler saw Freud as a therapist, in what has 
since become a famous session. 
Himianities 

HU 478 
Aesthetics Seminar 

3 credits. 3 hours 

Advanced philosophic problems related to 
works of art and discourse about works of art. 
Students review the analytic method of philo- 
sophic inquiry and discuss the philosophy 
of Wittgenstein and other 20th century 
philosophers. 
Humanities 

HU480 

Psychology of Creativity 

3 credits. 3 hours 

The problems involved in defining and 
attempting to measure creativity. The course is 
developmentally oriented, focusing on rela- 
tionships between creativity and normal 
growth and development, and intelligence and 
personality. Problems that the artist encoun- 
ters with productivity are explored, as well as 
the values of society toward creativity and the 
artist. 

Prerequisite: HU 181 A or B. 
Social Science 



The University of the Aits Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



165 



HU 481 A/B 
Physics 

3 credits, 3 hours 

An introductory college physics course. The 
first semester covers kinematics, dynamics, 
energy, structural analysis, and waves: the 
second semester concentrates on a study of 
light, electricity, and magnetism. Both semes- 
ters include frequent references to 
architecture, design, and the fine arts. 
Competence in algebra is required. 
SciencelMath 

HU483 

Theories of Personality 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Introduces the study of personality and how 
patterns of behavior, interaction, perception, 
and response are understood by a broad 
variety of theorists. Quesfions of nature versus 
nurture, whether the past impacts the present, 
and what defines mental health are discussed. 
Psychodynamic, cognitive, humanistic, and 
behavioral approaches are compared and 
contrasted. 

Prerequisites: HUI8IA and HU 181 B; or 
HUlSlAorB and one of the following: HV 374. 
HU378, HU384. HU480. HV484. MM 360. 
Social Science 

HU484 

Educational Psychology 

3 credits, 3 hours 

An introduction to educational psychology for 
potential educators. The basic principles of 
learning theory and education are presented 
and critically examined. Using a psychosocial 
orientation, the developmental stages of the 
human life cycle are explored, as well as the 
needs of a variety of special populations, e.g. 
those with learning disabilities or physical dis- 
abilities. Considerable attention is given to 
increasing awareness and understanding 
of communication, group dynamics, and 
organizational behavior. 
Social Science 

HU492 

Vienna and Berlin: 1890-1925 

3 credits, 3 hours 

At the beginning of the 20th century, Vienna 
and Beriin were important centers during one 
of the richest periods in the cultural and 
artistic history of the Western worid. Much of 
the science and art of this century was given 
its focus and thrust by the men of genius 
working in these two cifies. In this course, stu- 
dents examine the works of Einstein, Freud, 
Mahler, Schoenberg, Wittgenstein, Kafka, and 
the German Expressionists. An interdiscipli- 
nary course involving the visual, musical, and 
literary arts, as well as philosophy. 
Humanities 



HU495 

Dante in the Modern World 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Dante's Divine Comedy has been highly intlu- 
endal on art, music, and drama from its own 
time to the present. The shaping power of the 
poet's journey in his search for answers to 
ulfimate questions, and his quest for order and 
its reflection in his art continue to inspire reac- 
tions from fellow artists. The course considers 
a number of works reflecfing this influence in 
several media. Concentration is on the 
Inferno, but consideration of Paradiso and 
Purgatorio may also be included. 
Literature 

HU 497 

Women and Sex Roles 

3 credits, 3 hours 

An introducfion to the history of women and 
to theories of gender An interdisciplinary 
course combining history, literature, and the 
visual arts. Slide lectures on images of woman 
in art, myth, and religion, from ancient times 
to modem. Economic and historical factors 
affecting how women have lived. Definitions 
of masculinity and femininity. The nature-nur- 
ture debate over hormonal differences. 
Literature 

HU 999 
Independent Study 

1-3 credits, 1-3 hours 

Independent study considers a particular issue 
of interest to the student and one or more fac- 
ulty that is not covered in a regular course. 
Prior approval by the Director of Liberal Arts 
is required. 



Industrial Design 



ID 113 
Freshman ID 

1.5 credits, 3 hours 

This course introduces Foundation students to 
the issues surrounding the industrial design 
profession and highlights its importance in 
informing culture and shaping the way we 
live. The fundamental skills required to sup- 
port the process of concept ideation, design 
development, and presentation of products and 
furniture are introduced through in-class exer- 
cises, lectures by visiting professionals, and 
direct involvement in relevant activities within 
the Industrial Design department itself. 

ID 200 A/B 

Studio 1: Projects Studio 

3 credits, 6 hours 

Formal introduction to the conceptual and 
practical understanding of design and three- 
dimensional problem-solving processes. This 
studio provides focused fundamental design 
instruction and integrated experiences cov- 
ering a wide range of subjects including the 
tools, processes, and languages of design. 
Emphasis is on the development of three- 
dimensional model-making skills, problem 
solving, creative thinking, and their applica- 
tion to problems of design. 
Prerequisite: Completion of the Foundation pro- 
gram or permission of the instructor by 
portfolio review. 

ID 214 

Materials and Processes Seminar 

3 credits, 3 hours 

A hands-on seminar course introducing the 
student to the nature of materials used in 
industrial products and the various processes 
by which they are formed. Films, lectures, and 
field trips familiarize students with traditional 
processing of wood, metal, and plastic mate- 
rials as well as emerging developments in 
advanced fabrication processes such as injec- 
tion molding, laser cutting, and 
stereolithography. Emphasis is on the study of 
material characteristics and the appropriate 
use of manufacturing methods. The course 
includes an introduction to technical informa- 
tion, research, design specification writing, 
and professional communications. 
Prerequisite: Completion of the Foundation pro- 
gram or permission of the instructor by 
portfolio review. 



166 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



ID 220 A/B 

Studio 2: Techniques 

3 credits, 6 hours 

This studio will assist the student in acquiring 
essential two- and three-dimensional represen- 
tational skills to support the process of design, 
including conceptualization, production, and 
presentation. It is taught in a collaborative 
manner; the instructors conduct projects indi- 
vidually or as a team in order to provide 
instruction and experiences over a wide range 
of subjects, including the tools, processes, and 
languages of conceptual drawing and mod- 
eling, rendering and detailing, using both the 
computer and traditional media as a means to 
assist design and control production. Students 
learn to apply these techniques to design prob- 
lems addressed in ID 200 A/B. 
Prerequisite: Completion of the Foundation pro- 
pain or permission of the instructor by 
portfolio revie)f. 

ID 290 

Design Issues Seminar 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Designed to assist the student in developing an 
understanding of the major issues of design in 
modern society. Discussions range from issues 
such as the ecological responsibility of 
designers to the contributions of individual 
designers and design organizations throughout 
the history of the discipline. Assignments 
include research and demonstration projects 
that explore ideas and illuminate ethical, prac- 
tical, and moral issues with which designers 
should be concerned. Students prepare infor- 
mation and present their views on issues 
through written, oral, and visual means. 
Prerequisite: Completion of the Foundation pro- 
gram or permission of the instructor by 
portfolio review. 



ID 300 A/B 

Studio 3: Projects Studio 

3 credits, 6 hours 

The first semester introduces problems of 
design from a highly conceptual point of view 
with an emphasis on user interface, informa- 
tion technology, and areas of use. In the 
second semester, the students apply this 
humanistic understanding to develop more 
complex products involving mechanical tech- 
nology and systems. Emphasis is on the ability 
to apply the process of design to both hypo- 
thetical and real problems while developing an 
appreciation of meaningful form and the 
appropriate use of technology to meet human 
needs. Students discover relevant knowledge 
and apply it to practical problems of design- 
many brought to the studio by industry. 
Visiting experts also bring knowledge of cur- 
rent design, marketing, and manufacturing 
practices into studio projects organized to 
explore the nature of different product types in 
different industries. 
Prerequisites: ID 200 B. ID 220 B. and ID 290. 

ID 312 
Architectonics 

3 credits, 6 hours 

Visual principles for structuring and ordering 
architectural space. Introduction to formal 
issues as applied to interior installations and 
exhibition design will be developed through 
drawing, model-building skills, and other rep- 
resentational means such as computer-aided 
drafting. This course will develop concepts 
through analytical studies of objects/spaces 
and will culminate in an actual built/altered 
environment. 

ID 320 A/B 

Studio 4: Techniques 

3 credits, 6 hours 

Assists the student in developing graphic com- 
munication skills using computational media 
and applying these skills to both two- and 
three-dimensional images and presentations. 
The student is taught to conceptualize, 
develop, detail, present, and communicate 
design ideas through graphic design, computer 
imaging, three-dimensional computer mod- 
eling, basic animation, and interactive design 
presentation. The first semester focuses on 
integrating graphic software and the develop- 
ment of printed presentations. The second 
semester focuses on the development of inter- 
active digital presentations. 
Prerequisites: ID 200 B. ID 220 B. and ID 290. 



ID 326 

Human Factors Seminar 

3 credits, 3 hours 

The object of this research-intensive course is 
to develop the ability to apply technology 
effectively to meet human needs through the 
integration of human engineering principles in 
the design of products and equipment. Human 
anatomy, anthropometrics, and the strength of 
body components are considered, as are sen- 
sory systems, human perception, and 
psychology. Lectures are complemented by 
laboratory experiments designed to teach stu- 
dents methods of testing and evaluadng their 
own product design concepts in human terms. 
Concepts of scientific writing and reporting 
are demonstrated through the documentation 
of coursework. 

Prerequisites: ID300A.ID214. ID 320.4, 
and ID 327. 

ID 327 

Design Semantics Seminar 

3 credits, 3 hours 

This seminar addresses design as a languaging 
process of social interaction. Semantic princi- 
ples and design vocabulary are introduced 
through lectures, weekly readings, discus- 
sions, and exercises. Students work on 
individual as well as team-based projects to 
increase the competence of translating these 
ideas, concepts, and principles into design 
practices, applying replicable design methods 
toward proposing particular products whose 
meanings matter and whose use is dominated 
by facets of human understanding. 
Prerequisites: ID 200 B. ID 220 B. 
and ID 290. 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



167 



ID 400 A/B 

Studio 5: Projects Studio 

3 credits. 6 hours 

In these senior design studio courses, the cur- 
ricukim focuses on a highly critical and 
responsible position in formulating new direc- 
tions into product realization. 

Students are encouraged through critical 
discourse and research on historical and con- 
temporary cultural shifts to formulate their 
own ideology. Investigations into the social, 
ergonomic and ecological consequences of 
product development are followed by a spe- 
cific program of context, abstractions and 
conceptual studies, physical and material 
experimentation, and the research of tech- 
niques of construction. Development of 
manual skills, highly communicative design 
drawings, sketch models, computer modeling, 
prototypes, and one-off objects are all 
involved in the process. 

Industry-sponsored projects of international 
caliber give opportunities for "client interac- 
tion" from initial contact and proposals to 
final presentadons of projects. One semester is 
dedicated to production furniture design for 
the new domesticity. The other semester is 
dedicated to product design. A highly aca- 
demic and theoretical thesis project runs 
simultaneously with a highly pragmatic 
product development studio. 
Prerequisites: ID 300 B. ID 320 B. ID 326. 
and ID 327. 

ID 420 A/B 

Studio 6: Professional 

Communication 

3 credits. 6 hours 

Refines the students' written, verbal, and 
visual presentation skills, and assists them in 
developing communication materials for their 
senior theses and industry-sponsored projects. 
Intensive group critique of individual presen- 
tations prepared outside of class. Students 
develop self-promotion, presentation, and cor- 
respondence materials utilizing service 
bureaus and contemporary technologies such 
as digital files, fax and the World Wide Web to 
prepare and transmit this information. 
Prerequisites: ID 300 B. ID 320 B. ID 326. 
and ID 327. 



ID 490 A 

Design Theory Seminar 

3 credits, 3 hours 

In this industrial design seminar, students will 
investigate advanced design philosophies, 
issues, and pedagogy, from a historic as well 
as contemporary international design context. 
Students study various definitions of design, 
explore design theories and issues, and con- 
sider theoretical relafionships with other 
applied arts. 

Prerequisites: ID 300 B, ID 320 B, ID 326. 
and ID 327. 

ID 490 B 

Design Practice Seminar 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Exposes the student to industrial design pro- 
fessional practice through discussion, lectures, 
and research. The following subjects are 
addressed: 

1. Running a practice 

2. Legalities and contracts 

3. Publicadons 

4. Exhibidng -^ 

5. Client interacdon 

6. Portfolio 

Visitors represent a broad spectrum of the 
design community from across the United 
States, including design shop owners, design 
curators from galleries or museums, industrial 
design entrepreneurs, and copynght lawyers. 
Prerequisites: ID 300 B. ID 320 B. ID 326. 
and ID 327. 

IN 440 

Design internship 

3 credits. 90 hours/semester 

Open to Graphic Design. Illustration, and Industrial 

Design majors only. 



Master of Industrial 
Design 

ID 600 

Design Seminar: 

Concepts and Contexts 

3 credits. 3 hours 

A seminar devoted to examining the shift in 
cultural, technological, material, and profes- 
sional landscapes that a graduate design 
candidate must navigate. Through readings, 
presentations, and discussions, students 
explore how these evolved contexts are 
changing the nature of design practice and 
thinking. Special emphasis is placed on devel- 
oping key concepts and ideas that inform the 
work that the students undertake throughout 
their program. The seminar works in parallel 
with the studio course; topics and themes cov- 
ered in the seminar are germane to the studio 
projects. 
With permission of instructor 

ID 601, ID 602 
Graduate Design Studio 

6 credits. 6 hours 

The major mulddisciplinary studio where 
design ideology, process, development, and 
production are emphasized through the inte- 
gration of critical issues that inform the design 
of products, systems, and environments. 
Issues discussed and studied are: human expe- 
rience and lifestyles: cultural and political 
issues; ergonomics; poetics; semantics; inter- 
activity; imagery; and form. The design 
process considers the above issues in the 
formulation of a design program: conceptual 
and abstract studies: physical and material 
investigations; simulated and physical 
representation; and the application of 
manufacturing processes. 
Coreqiiisite: ID 600. 

ID 620 

Advanced Design Methods 

3 credits. 3 hours 

As a complement to the studio course (ID 
601 ), this course helps to develop methodolo- 
gies for critical, social and cultural analysis, 
sU'ategies for design research, and the means 
for documenting that research and analysis. 
Students develop a common design process 
that provides the foundation for all subsequent 
MID work. The emphasis is on clear and con- 
vincing communication, a skill that is 
increasingly critical to designers as they work 
more and more with those outside of their own 
disciplines. Content for the course-work 
comes directiy from the studio projects 
themselves. 
Corequisite:ID601. 



168 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



ID 625 

Advanced Computer Applications 

3 credits. 3 hours 

A laboratory /practicum in the use of advanced 
computing capabihties with emphasis on 
three-dimensional computer modeling, ren- 
dering, animation, and human figure modeling 
to evaluate and present design solutions with 
attention to collaborative design support 
systems. 
With permission of instructor. 

ID 627 

Human Factors: Interactivity 

3 credits. 3 hours 

A seminar course that addresses human 
behavior through the interaction with manu- 
factured objects, environments and systems, 
and the ergonomic, functional, informational, 
aesthetic, and safety requirements encountered 
in the design of these products for human use. 
With permission of instructor 

ID 700 

ID Seminar: 

Professional Development 

3 credits. 3 hours 

A professional seminar/workshop that 
addresses the individual career interests of 
each degree candidate, especially as they 
relate to the smdent's thesis project. The 
product of this course is the formulation of a 
careei" plan and objectives tailored to each 
candidate, and the development of a portfolio, 
resume, and other documentation targeted 
toward the practical application of the candi- 
date's knowledge and skill. . 
Prerequisite: ID 710. 

ID 710, ID 711 

Advanced Project Tutorial I, II 

6 credits. 6 hours 

Primary studio/practicums in which design 
concepts are explored and skills, techniques, 
tools, and products are developed, demon- 
strated, and tested related to the thesis. 
Individual weekly meetings are scheduled 
with faculty and with outside advisors as dic- 
tated by thesis project objectives and 
sponsorship. A faculty-monitored educational 
practicum in a professional or industry setting 
may be arranged to fulfill preplanned project 
and career objectives. 
Prerequisite: ID 602. 



ID 749 

Masters Thesis Documentation 

6 credits. 6 hours 

A tutorial providing the opportunity for indi- 
vidual candidates to develop and present their 
theses in a manner that directly reflects their 
career objectives. The thesis project and docu- 
ment must exhibit an in-depth exploration of 
an appro\'ed topic, which addresses an area of 
importance to the Industrial Design field and 
contributes to the body of know ledge per- 
taining to that area. It may be carried out 
under industry sponsorship, as part of a 
research project, or independently based. 
Prerequisite: ID 602. 



Illustration 



IL 100 

Foundation Illustration 

1.5 credits. 3 hours 

Within the context of illustration assignments, 
students are introduced to a variety of media, 
methods, styles, and techniques used to create 
both black-and-white and color illustrations. 
Includes conceptual, perceptual, and technical 
problems. The development of narrative skills, 
logical steps to problem solving, research, and 
creative thinking will also be covered. Guest 
Illustrators offer insight into the many ways 
artists are working in the field. 

IL200A/B 
Pictorial Foundation 

3 credits. 6 hours 

Introduction to drawing and painfing skills as 
they relate to illustration. Objective visual per- 
cepUon, clarity in drawing, and technical 
facility are stressed. Smdents are exposed to 
visual communications, strategies, and design 
concepts through exposure to art history and 
the field of contemporary illustration. 
Prerequisite: FP III. 

IL 202 A/B 
Figure Anatomy 

3 credits, 2 hours (lecture), 
3 hours (drawing lab) 

Focus on the investigation and application of 
line, plane, mass. light and shade, shadow, 
perspective, anatomy, and proportion as they 
relate to figure drawing. Weekly sessions 
include a lecture, demonstrations from the 
skeleton, and drawing from life. 
Prerequisite: FP III. 

IL204 
Typography 

3 credits, 6 hours 

Beginning studies in the form, use, nomencla- 
ture, and history of typography. Individual 
letters, word formations, text arrangements, 
type combined with imagery, and the applica- 
tion of type to simple communication 
exercises will be addressed. Use of Macintosh 
computer for generating type and industry- 
accepted software will be used. 
Prerequisite: FP 121. 



The University of the Ans Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



169 



IL205 

Drawing for Animators 

3 credits, 6 hours 

Focuses on introducing and developing the 
skills and disciplines needed for good figura- 
tive animation drawing. The primary issues of 
anatomical figure drawing are covered with a 
strong emphasis on the structure and solidity 
of the figure, good proportions, and specific 
movement and gesture as they relate to the 
model. Topics also covered: two-dimensional 
versus three-dimensional ways of translating 
form; how perspective and viewpoint are 
used with the figure and their effect on scale; 
exaggerated foreshortening techniques; dia- 
grammatic and expressive line quality; facial 
expressions; hand and foot studies; capturing 
movement through gesture; and introduction 
to animal drawing for animation. 
Prerequisite: FP II I. 

IL300A/B 
Illustration Methods 

3 credits, 6 hours 

The development of narrative and conceptual 
imagery, pictorial illusion, space, and their 
combined potential for communicadon. 
Procedures focus on developing visual aware- 
ness, personal imagery, and conceptual 
directions. Direct drawing situadons and pho- 
tographic reference (existing or student- 
produced) also serve as source material for 
pictorial development. Various media and 
technical procedures are explored. The history 
of the Golden Age of American Illustration is 
covered. Assignments and lectures focus on 
the requirements of applied illustration. 
Prerequisite: IL 200 B. 

IL301 

Design Methods 

3 credits, 6 hours 

Within the context of design/illustration proj- 
ects, a basic understanding of how artwork is 
reproduced in commercial print media. 
Emphasis is on the relationship between elec- 
tronic media and production techniques. 
Specific programs udlized include: 
QuarkXPress, Adobe Illustrator, and Adobe 
PhotoShop. 
Prerequisite: IL 204. 

IL302 

Figurative Communication 

3 credits, 6 hours 

Emphasis is on working from life. The course 

focuses on the use of the figure and or sdll life 

objects to communicate concepts in the 

figurative context. Drawing and painting 

media are explored. 

Prerequisite: IL 202 B. 



IL 303 . 
Figure Utilization 

3 credits, 6 hours 

Studies of the figure in narrative contexts are 
explored, as is work from single and grouped 
models, nude and costumed. Concentration on 
developing composidons and concepts from 
different and often combined resources. 
Drawing and painting techniques are utilized. 
Prerequisite: IL 302. 

IL304 
Sequential Format 

3 credits, 6 hours 

Course focuses on sequendal formats. 

Potential areas of inquiry include brochures, 

direct-mail pieces, simple animations, slide 

presentations, multi-page spreads, and identity 

programs. 

Prerequisite: IL 301. 

IL 310 

Children's Book Illustration 

3 credits, 6 hours 

The design and illustradon of children's 

books. Emphasis on the stages of development 

of a book from manuscript through dummy 

design to finished art. Professional practice, 

and working with editors and art directors are 

discussed. Students become familiar with the 

work of past and present book illustration and 

design. 

Prerequisite: FP 1 1 1. Juniors and Seniors preferred. 

IL 400 A/B 
Illustration 

3 credits, 6 hours 

Assignments revolve around specific areas of 
illustradon-advertising, book, documentary, 
editorial, and insdtutional. Emphasis is on 
solutions, both practical and relevant, and the 
type and quality of finish for professional 
needs and demands. A senior thesis project 
(Ely Competition) is incorporated in the 
fall/spring semesters. 
Prerequisite: IL 300 B. 

IL 402 

Communication Worl<shop 

1.5 credits, 3 hours 

Structured as a design studio, the workshop 
brings Graphic Design and Illustration majors 
and their respective faculty together to pro- 
duce posters for School of Theater Arts 
productions. Students are challenged with 
real-life, professional design studio experi- 
ences: working with a client on a deadline 
from concept and design through production 
in the University's Borowsky Center for 
Publicadon Arts. 

Junior and Senior Graphic Design and Illustration 
majors only, approved by faculty advisors. 



IL 403 A/B 
Senior Portfolio 

3 credits, 6 hours 

Development of a portfolio based on the stu- 
dent's personal interests, abilities, and target 
markets. Students focus on a freelance or 
studio orientation and develop over the year a 
working portfolio for presentation at the end 
of the spring term. In addidon to the portfolio, 
the course offers instrucdon in marketing and 
promodon, business pracdces and procedures, 
resume writing, taxes, and small business 
requirements as they relate to artists. The 
course culminates in The University of the 
Arts' Portfolio Day at the Society of 
Illustrators in New York at the end of the 
semester. 

Prerequisite: IL 300 B. 
Corequisite:IL400AIB. 

IL 404 

Illustration Workshop: 

Personal Viewpoint 

3 credits, 6 hours 

This special elective course is offered by the 
Illustration Department for qualified Junior 
and Senior Illustration majors. The 
Department invites three of America's most 
accomplished illustrators to share their talent, 
insights, and expertise by finding and empha- 
sizing the personal conceptual viewpoint of 
each student. The goal is to meld that identity 
with each student's developing technique to 
create the greater vision of the artist through 
illustradon as a self-expressive art form. Each 
of the three faculty presents his or her work 
and answers questions in an open forum, and 
then teaches an intensive four-week long part 
of the course. The artists give lectures, tech- 
nical demonstrations, and studio assignments 
and students work through a demanding 
process to produce finished illusQ-ations. This 
flexible curriculum also allows for timely 
illustradon issues to be covered as they 
develop in the field. 
Prerequisite: IL 300 A, Junior ai\d Senior 
Illustration majors only, by portfolio review. 

IN 440 

Design Internship 

3 credits, 90 hours/semester 

Open to Graphic Design. Illustration, and Industrial 

Design majors only. 



170 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



Internships 



Intepiships are a valuable part of a stu- 
dent's academic experience. By 
reinforcing and expanding classroom 
theory and practice, internships enable 
students to test career choices and gain a 
greater understanding of the workplace 
through this initial entiy into the profes- 
sional world. The ultimate goal of the 
internship is to assist students in testing 
and expanding their professional skills 
and knowledge, and enabling them to 
make informed career decisions. 

Students applying for an internship 
must meet the following eligibility 
requirements: junior or senior level in a 
BS or BFA program, a 2.5 cumulative 
grade-point average, and be registered 
for no more than 18 credits, including 
those from the Internship during the 
semester No more than six Internship 
credits may be credited toward a BS or 
BFA degree. 

CM 499 

Communication Internship 

1 .5 credits, 90 hours/semester 
Professional internship with a media organiza- 
tion or producer. Student needs to gain 
approval for internship from advisor, meet 
periodically for supervisory discussions, and 
complete a short, reflective essay at the end of 
the internship. 
Open to Communication majors only. 

DA 499 
Internship 

3-12 credits. 90-360 hours/semester 
Internships are a valuable part of a student's 
academic experience. By reinforcing and 
expanding classroom theory and practice, 
internships enable students to test career 
choices and gain a greater understanding of 
the workplace through this initial entry into 
the professional world. The ultimate goal of 
the internship is to assist students in testing 
and expanding their professional skills and 
knowledge, and enabling them to make 
informed career decisions. 
Open only to Junior and Senior Dance majors. 

IN 440 

Design Internship 

3 credits, 90 hours/semester 

Open to Graphic Design, Illustration, and Industrial 

Design majors only. 

IN 449 

Crafts/Fine Arts Internship 

3 credits, 90 hours/semester 

Open to Crafts and Fine A rts majors only. 



MM 499 

Multimedia Internship 

3 credits, 90 hours/semester 

Students are placed with regional companies 

to expose them to a real work environment in 

the fields of multimedia, web design, and 

information. 

Open to Multimedia majors only. 

MS 759 

Graduate Museum Internship 

3 credits. 90 hours/semester 
A three-month, supervised practicum in a 
cooperating museum. Taken in a cooperating 
museum, the internship represents full-time 
employment equivalency under the mentor- 
ship of a professional museum educator 
Provides practical on-site experience, in which 
the intern is integrated into the museum staff, 
assuming professional-level responsibilities 
and experience. A University professor also 
observes, advises, and assesses the student 
during the internship. 
Prerequisite for Museum Exhibition Planning 
and Design majors: 15 credits in Museum Studies. 
Prerequisites for Museum Communication majors: 
MS 501, MS 508. MS 600. 
Prerequisites for Museum Education majors: 
MS 5 10, MS 501, and MS 508. 
Open to Museum Studies majors only 

MU 499 

Music Internship 

1-3 credits. 30-60 hours 
An opportunity to participate in a workplace 
environment during the academic year. 
Students earn internship credit by completing 
a minimum number of hours in the field 
during the semester, and by satisfying the 
requirements of the sponsor, such as atten- 
dance, punctuality, responsibility, 
professionalism, and tasks completed. 
Students may be assigned to recording stu- 
dios, radio stations, arts organizations, or with 
music publishers, entertainment attorneys, 
music therapists, or record producers. 

MU 620/621 

Graduate Professional Internship 

1 credit, 15 hours/semester 
Provides hands-on. sitting-in experience in a 
variety of professional settings-rehearsals, 
performances, meetings with producers, and 
in-studio projects such as recording, 
arranging, or project coordination. The pro- 
gram is developed by the graduate advisor and 
major teacher in conjunction with the student 
to select topics and experiences most relevant 
and beneficial to that particular suident's 
education. 

Prerequisite: Matriculation in the Master of Music 
program. 



PF 499 
Internship 

3 credits, 90 hours/semester 
Internship program in which the student is 
placed in one of several professional situa- 
tions. Placements in photography may include 
assisting in professional studios, practice in 
biomedical photography laboratories, and 
curatorial positions in galleries, among others. 
Placements in film and animation are spon- 
sored by local independent production houses 
and television stations, design firms, and free- 
lance animation artists; students of film may 
assist in location shooting, set production, 
editing, casting and scripting, and a myriad of 
other practical tasks. 

Prerequisite: PF 211 B (for Photo internships) : 
or PF2I0B (for Film/Video internships) : 
or PF2I2 B (for Animation internships) . 
Open to Media Arts majors only 

TH 449 
Internship 

3-12 credits, hours by assignment 
Hands-on involvement with a professional 
company. Placements may consist of adminis- 
trative or production support work, positions 
in assistance to directors, producers, stage 
managers or dramaturges, literary manage- 
ment, casting, understudying or performance, 
and may be outside of the Philadelphia area. 
Prerequisite Icorequisite: TH 419. 
Open 10 Theater A rts majors only 

WM499 
Internship 

3 credits, 6 hours 

Seniors are placed with companies to expose 

them to a real work environment in the field of 

media. Placements vary and may include local 

network-affiliated television stations or public 

broadcasting stations. A paper or journal 

chronicling the experience is required upon 

completion of the internship. 

Open to Seniors in Writing for Film and Television 

only. 



iity of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



171 



Master of Fine Arts in 
Ceramics, Painting, or 
Sculpture 

Each summer session will begin with a 
detailed review of the student's previous 
work, assessing progress, addressing 
problems, and planning the summer's 
work. Ongoing individual meetings with 
the studio mentor will be augmented by 
group critiques at the beginning, middle, 
and end of the summer session and by 
occasional group or individual critiques 
with visiting artists. Each summer's 
course concludes with planning for work 
to be continued on an independent study 
basis during the academic year. 
Independent studio work is assessed at 
weekend critiques held at periodic inter- 
vals and at the end of the fall and spring 
semesters. 

The following courses are open to students in 
the summer MFA program only. 

CR 610 
PT 610 
SC610 
Major Studio I 

6 credits. 10 hours 

Evaluation of the student's artistic involve- 
ment; projecting and testing options for the 
direction of the student's graduate work. 

CR611 
PT 611 
SC 611 
Major Studio II 

6 credits. 10 hours 

Further exploration of the options, with 
increased awareness of theoretical issues and 
personal vision. Greater focus in the student's 
work, with a view to completing the personal 
repertoire of skills and expression in the 
medium needed to undertake a thesis project. 
Prerequisites: CR610.PT blO.SC 610. 

CR710 

PT710 

SC710 ^ 

Major Studio III 

6 credits. 10 hours 

Planning and initiation of a sustained body of 
mature work to be presented in a thesis exhibi- 
tion during the following summer. 
Prerequisites: CR6I1.PT611.SC61 1. 



FA 610 
Studio Topics 

3 credits, 5 hours repeatable 
Brings together students from each of the 
major disciplines to explore studio issues 
common to all visual arts. 

FA 611 
Graduate Drawing 

3 credits, 5 hours 

Advanced studio develops and expands the 
student's visual language and skills while 
challenging his or her conceptual approach to 
drawing by examining and applying the use of 
materials and methods having historic and cul- 
tural origins. 

Open to all CAD graduate students upon 
portfolio approval. 

FA 612 

Professional Practices 

3 credits, 5 hours 

Designed to familiarize students with 
methods, practices, and professional standards 
in preparation for the thesis exhibition and 
eventual entry into the visual arts professions. 
Prerequisites: FA 610. FA 611. 

FA 691, FA 692 
Independent Studio I, II in 
Ceramics, Painting, or Sculpture 
Winter/Summer Critique 

3 credits per semester, 5 hours 
The Independent Studio is intended to assist 
the student in establishing independent pro- 
duction in his or her major discipline while 
acquiring the ability to integrate studio pro- 
duction with the demands of off-campus life. 
At the conclusion of Summer I and. subse- 
quently. Winter Critique I, the student and 
faculty mentor agree on a plan of work to be 
pursued during the off-campus semester, 
which will be a continuation of work begun in 
the previous semester. The student is required 
to propose a direction for his/her investiga- 
tions and to have access to off-campus studio 
space within which to carry out the proposal. 
Enrollment in the Independent Studio requires 
a commitment of 150 hours, equivalent to 10 
hours of studio activity per week during the 
15-week off-campus semester The suidio 
mentor meets with the student five times 
during the semester at three-week intervals, 
reviewing the student's progress for a one to 
two hour session. The first meeting is a group 
meeting held on campus and the next three are 
held as individual critiques at the student's 
studio. One meeting may take place at the 
mentor's studio. The last meeting is the final 
critique of the semester, which takes place at 
the Winter Critique held at the University. 
Corequisile: FA 695, FA 696. 



FA 695, FA 696 

Independent Writing Project I, II 

1.5 credits, 3 hours 

Informs the student's ongoing Independent 
Studio investigations undertaken during the 
fall and spring off-campus semesters. The stu- 
dent proposes an area of research intended as 
a continued examination of topics introduced 
during the previous summer seminars, 
Structure and Metaphor or Art and Society. 
The student is encouraged to explore through 
writing the range of issues emanating from 
seminar reading and discussion, and the rela- 
tionship of these external influences to the 
development of themes and directions being 
explored in the studio work. 
Corequisile: FA 691, FA 692. 

FA 781, FA 782 

Tfiesis Writing Project I, II 

1.5 credits. 3 hours 

Fall and spring off-campus semesters. 
Research for the Thesis Writing Project 
informs the student's second-year independent 
studio activity, which focuses on identifying 
and developing potential directions for the 
thesis exhibition and written thesis. The stu- 
dent considers issues raised during the 
previous summer's seminar that are particu- 
larly relevant to the more focused direction of 
his or her studio work. The student independ- 
ently formulates a proposal and bibliography 
for a formal paper to be based upon the more 
developed direction of his or her work. The 
range of issues considered for further investi- 
gation may include aesthetic, conceptual, 
technical, or visual culture issues as well as 
the relationship of the major work to other dis- 
ciplines. 
Corequisile: FA 783, FA 794. 



172 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



FA 793 

Thesis Preparation I 

3 credits. 5 hours 

Following the successful completion of 
Summer II and the MFA Candidacy Review, 
the student is declared a degree candidate and 
may begin independently producing a body of 
work intended for eventual presentation in the 
thesis exhibition following completion of 
Summer III. In consultation with the studio 
mentor, the student submits Thesis 
Preparation Plan I. identifying and describing 
a direction of investigation to be undertaken 
during the fall semester. The student is 
expected to identify specific issues to be 
addressed: intended focus of the work, consid- 
erations of technique, materials, scale, 
location, etc. The student must propose a per- 
sonal timetable for accomplishing the thesis 
and identify the sources that will be used in 
preparation for the exhibition. Enrollment in 
Thesis Preparation I and II requires a commit- 
ment of 150 hours, equivalent to 10 hours of 
studio activity per week during the 15- week 
off-campus semester. 
Coreqiiisite: FA 781. 

FA 794 

Thesis Preparation II 

3 credits. 5 hours 

In consultation with the studio mentor, thesis 
candidates propose further development of 
directions begun in studio work the previous 
semester by submitting Thesis Preparation 
Plan II for the spring semester to the mentor. 
Coreqiiisite: FA 782. 

FA 795 

Thesis Exhibition 

6 credits. 10 hours 

The MFA degree certifies that the artist has 
attained a high level of competence and inde- 
pendent judgment in the discipline and is 
qualified to stand with his/her mentors as a 
master artist. The thesis exhibition and accom- 
panying written thesis are intended to serve as 
a demonstration of this mastery. During the 
final semester, criticism-based research is 
undertaken as a continuation of the summer 
seminar in Criticism and is intended to assist 
the MFA candidate in completing the written 
component of the thesis requirements. 



GR691 

University Seminar: 

Structure and Metaphor 

3 credits, 3 hours 

An interdisciplinary seminar in which students 
from all graduate programs examine theoret- 
ical issues of structure and metaphor in 
relation to art and design. Topics include 
cognidon and perception, meaning and repre- 
sentation, and systems of organization and 
expression. 

(May he taken to satisfy Aesthetics and Art 
Criticism corequisites for the MAT program.) 
Graduate students only. 

GR692 

University Seminar: 

Art and Design in Society 

3 credits, 3 hours 

An interdisciplinary seminar in which students 
from all graduate programs examine theoret- 
ical issues relating to the place of art and 
design in society. Topics include the social 
role of the artist/designer, public policy and 
the arts, issues of post-modernism, and aes- 
thetic and ethical implications of emerging 
arts and communications technologies. 
(May be taken to satisfy Sociolog}'/Anthropology 
corequisites for the M.4T program.) 
Graduate students only 

GR791 

University Seminar: Criticism 

3 credits. 3 hours 

An interdisciplinary seminar in which 
advanced graduate students further examine 
the nature of image-making and design with 
particular attention to the theories and applica- 
tions of criticism. 
Graduate students only 



Multimedia 



MM 110, MM 111 
Visual Concepts I, II 

3 credits. 6 hours 

The fall semester covers fundamental visual 
concepts including point, line, shape, compo- 
sition, texture, color, and image. Although 
non-digital techniques are occasionally used, 
the mastery of digital tools is a primary 
aspect. Exercises require students to develop a 
vocabulary for discussing their work while at 
the same time learning a basic set of software 
tools. The spring semester continues with an 
introduction to the visual concepts of typog- 
raphy, series, sequence, and narrative. 
Prerequisite: Open to non-majors with permission 
of the instructor. 

MM 121 

Introduction to Interface Design 

3 credits. 3 hours 

The software interface represents the focal 
point of user interacfion with the various 
modes of multimedia communication. 
Readings by interface theorists will inform 
discussions on the evolution of the software 
interface, conceptual models, prototypes, 
interaction design, deliverables, and basic 
concepts of human-computer mteraction. 
Avenues for pursuing interactive media design 
in entertainment, publishing, and education 
will also be addressed. Current technologies, 
including the trend from soft to hard interfaces 
are studied, in terms of their potential short- 
and long-term influence on communication 
and multimedia. Basic methods for rapid pro- 
totyping and testing are considered. 
Prerequisite: Open to non-majors with permission 
of the instructor 

MM 130 
Information Concepts 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Emphasis is on the importance of organizing 
and communicating information in a digital 
worid. Students will acquire a basic under- 
standing of how computers operate and 
communicate with each other, as well as an 
understanding of the evolution of the personal 
computer and the industries that have spun out 
of this technology. Student assignments 
include readings, database projects, and 
written analysis. 

Prerequisite: Open to non-majors with permission 
of the instructor 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



173 



MM 150 

Collaboration and Spontaneity 

3 credits. 3 hours 

Through a series of exercises, class discus- 
sions, and readings, explores what it means to 
work as part of a team. Students learn to 
develop environments in which the creative 
process is encouraged to unfold. The basic 
assumptions that affect the formation of col- 
laborative groups, such as personal 
responsibility, authority relations, leadership 
issues, individual differences, competition, the 
development of norms, and the generation and 
uses of power are experienced, explicated, and 
examined. Students work within this collabo- 
rative environment to explore the connections 
between spontaneous verbal and nonverbal 
communications. 

Open to non-majors with permission of tiie 
instructor. 

MM 210 

Visual Concepts Studio 

3 credits. 6 hours 

Visual problem solving in a digital environ- 
ment. A project-based visual art/design studio 
that builds on skills developed in Visual 
Concepts II. This course allows students the 
time to concentrate on and refine the visual 
communications aspects of their craft through 
three fully realized pieces. Projects are 
assigned by the instructor, and conceived of 
and developed by the students. Projects may 
include but are not limited to: titling design 
and animation, visual interface design; 
graphic design; CD packaging design; poster 
and postcard design; digital painting and 
drawing, etc. 

Prerequisite: MM 111, or permission of the 
instructor. 

MM 219 

Introduction to Multimedia 

3 credits, 6 hours 

An introduction to the basic software environ- 
ments for digital interactivity. After 
concentrating on creating nonlinear texts, stu- 
dents investigate the integration of other 
media elements. Subjects include the use of 
buttons, screen navigation, transitions, basic 
scripting, and controlling sound and video. 



MM 221, MM 222 
Interactive Studio I, II 

3 credits. 6 hours 

Concepts and practical applications of interac- 
tivity. The first semester focuses on creating 
interactive media in low bandwidth environ- 
ments. Developed for HTML environments 
and their extensions for the Worid Wide Web. 
Interactive modes explored include but are not 
limited to reading, play, and conversation. 
Comprised of both lectures and practical exer- 
cises. Individual creativity is stressed as well 
as the understanding and use of interactive 
devices in the communication of ideas. Both 
collaborative and individual exercises will be 
assigned. The second semester focuses on 
high bandwidth applications. 
Prerequisite: MM 121 or permission of the 
instructor 

MM 223 
Interactive Narrative 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Introduces students to new ways of thinking 
about interactivity and storytelling. Students 
analyze how the interactive structure of an 
experience creates narrative. Short readings 
discussed in class range from Surrealist Dada 
and Fluxus language games to the experi- 
mental literature of Joyce and Burroughs to 
the literary theories of Barthes and Eco. 
Students examine contemporary examples of 
interactive media such as CD-ROMs, role- 
playing games, and Internet sites. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor 

MM 231 

Digital Storytelling 

3 credits, 6 hours 

This class explores how visual and aural lan- 
guages complement the verbal while 
providing instruction in the use of multimedia 
software. After collecting old photographs, 
movies, tape recordings, and meaningful 
objects, students create stories associated with 
them in digital form. 

MM 240 
Writing for Games 

3 credits, 3 hours 

A writing laboratory that allows students to 
develop competency in writing rule-based pro- 
cedural description as well as evocative story 
lines for games and user/play scenarios. 
Special emphasis will be placed on the differ- 
ences in writing required between game types 
(chance, puzzles, and strategies) as well as 
game genres such as role-playing, twitch, and 
games of perfect information. 
Prerequisite: HU HOB. 



MM 271 

Survey of Multimedia 

3 credits. 3 hours 

Examines the chronological evolution of dig- 
ital technology and its inevitable application 
by the aesthetic community. Beginning with 
the development of digital technology in the 
mid- 1940s, the course discusses the conver- 
gence of the scientific, military, and political 
environments that spawned the employment of 
digital technology, including the path that led 
to the digital dominance over analog. Includes 
the enhancement, exploitation, and embracing 
of digital technology by the corporate and aes- 
thetic communities, the invention of the 
personal computer and its ancillary products, 
and the application of digital technologies in 
fields as diverse as medicine, communica- 
tions, manufacturing, cognidve psychology, 
and in particular, the arts. Pioneers in all fields 
will be identified and examined. 
Prerequisite: HU 103 B. 
Discipline History IHmnanities 

MM 310, MM 311 
Multimedia Studio I, II 

3 credits, 6 hours 

The experience of producing complete multi- 
media works in a project-based environment. 
Lectures and meetings augment this studio 
course. Individual creativity is stressed as well 
as collaboration in the creation of works 
through individual and group projects. 
Assignments vary in scale, and focus on 
appropriate planning and information archi- 
tecture, as well as acquisition and creation of 
content in various media. Programming envi- 
ronments used include but are not limited to 
HTML. Lingo, and Java Script. Previously 
introduced concepts and technology are re- 
explored with an emphasis on integration and 
effectiveness in the communication of the con- 
cept of the piece. 

Prerequisite: MM 222 or MM 219. or permission of 
the instructor 

MM 320 

Advanced Interface Seminar 

3 credits. 3 hours 
A seminar that builds on MM 121 
(Introduction to Interface Design). Focuses on 
the issues involved in creating user interfaces 
in today's development platforms (hardware, 
software, input devices, cell phones, etc.). 
Lectures, discussions, readings, research, and 
writing constitute the body of this course. In 
addition to current interface trends, the 
process of developing the interfaces of 
tomorrow is addressed. 
Prerequisite: MM 222, or permission of the 
instructor 



174 



The University of the Arts Undergi^duale and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



MM 340 

Interactive Programming 

3 credits. 3 hours 

Introductory programming dealing with cre- 
ating interactive apphcations. The focus of 
this course will be on client and server side 
programming languages. Students will create 
applications in each of the languages taught. 
The Internet as a programmable en\'ironment 
is stressed. This is primarily a lecture course 
supplemented with practical introductory pro- 
gramming exercises and exams. 
Prerequisites: MM 222, or permission of the 
instructor, and completion of Game Design minor 
requirements. 

MM 341 

Programming for Games 

3 credits, 6 hours 

An introduction to programing for interactive 
game environments. Students learn techniques 
and theory through exercises and applications 
that they construct. The programming lan- 
guage studied can change each semester and 
may include: FlashAction Scripting, 
Advanced Lingo for Games, C++, or Java. 
Prerequisite: MM 221, or permission of instructor. 

MM 342 
Game Play 

3 credits, 3 hours 

A lecture-based focus on the human behavior 
in the how and why of play and creativity. 
Course material examines the relationship 
between creativity and play, the effects of 
reward and punishment, cultural notions of 
play, and the integration of play with design 
techniques that will enhance sustainability of 
play. Students examine the differences 
between informed and uninformed play as 
well as the phenomenon of flow. 

MM 344 

Game Design Thesis Project 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Students complete a fully marketable game 

prototype. Students and instructor examine 

how the gaming industry functions as well as 

research and develop an individual work. 

Special attention is paid to preparing to enter 

the field. 

Prerequisite: Completion of Game Design minor 

requirements. 



MM 350 
Business Seminar 

2 credits, 2 hours 

A seminar that focuses on the professional 
implications of pursuing a career in multi- 
media's various industries. Taught by a guest 
lecturer. Lectures, discussions, readings, 
research, writings, and presentations consti- 
tute this course. Assignments include the 
creation of both a vita and resume in addition 
to a portfolio. Professional practice is stressed. 
Topics such as portfolio presentation, self-pro- 
motion, financials, interviewing, and firm 
research will be addressed. 
Prerequisite: MM 310. or permission of the 
instructor 

MM 360 

Psychology of Human/Computer 

Interaction 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Students explore the ways humans interact 
with computers. How do humans treat com- 
puters? Why? Should we interact with them 
the same way we do with other humans? The 
reasons behind why some computer interfaces 
work and some don't will be discussed in 
depth. Should computers be able to perceive 
our emotions? Or should computers them- 
selves have emotions'? The final for this course 
will allow students to take part in designing an 
original interface solution. 
Social Science 

MM 370 

E-Music Thesis Project 

3 credits, 3 hours 

A culminating course for students in the e- 
music minor in which they develop an 
application. Students develop a proposal for 
an application and carry the idea through 
research implementation, execution, and pres- 
entation. With the consent of the instructor, 
projects may be the work of one student or 
that of a group of students, be in a variety of 
shapes, and in a variety of media. 
Prerequisite: Completion of E-music minor 
requirements. 



MM 410, MM 411 
Senior Studio I, II 

4 credits, 8 hours 

Studio courses that make use of all the stu- 
dents" previous instruction. Consists of a 
six-hour studio component and a two-hour cri- 
tique component. One project completed each 
semester. Students will be prepared on the first 
day of each semester with a proposal that 
includes but is not limited to a schedule, map. 
research, executive summary, and supporting 
documentation. Projects can be collaborative 
or individual. Students are encouraged to try 
both over the course of the year. 
Prerequisite: MM 311. 
Open only to Multimedia majors. 

MM 440 

Innovative Interfaces 

3 credits. 6 hours 

The notion of digital environment transcends 
the concept of a computer, as we know it. 
These addresses and environments, although 
supported by digital technology, are non-com- 
puter-like in many respects. Building these 
environments calls for changes in the choice 
of interaction devices (using touch, voice, ges- 
tures, and possibly just user's intent as a basis 
for interaction), shape and size of computers 
(no boxes, but interactive surfaces), their loca- 
tion (floor, wall, pocket), as well as a change 
in content structure. Using cross-disciplinary 
data from cognitive and computer sciences 
and social psychology, the students in this 
research/studio course focus primarily on the 
design and development of innovative ways of 
interacting with digital technology. 
Prerequisite: MM 222. or permission of the 
instructor 

MM 470. MM 471 

Issues in Multimedia Seminar I, II 

1.5 credits, 1.5 hours 

These courses serve as vehicles for discussion 
of current topics in multimedia. Special atten- 
tion is paid to the discussion of emerging 
technologies and criteria for evaluating their 
effectiveness, appropriate use, and potential. 
Ethical issues surrounding new media are dis- 
cussed. 



Tlie University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



175 



MM 472 

Special Projects in Multimedia 

3 credits, 3 hours 

This seminar is designed to give students, 
direct contact with their soon-to-be peers in 
the various multimedia industries. The multi- 
media industries that may be covered include 
but are not limited to: fine art, interface 
design, installation art, game design, and elec- 
tronic music. Timely and relevant issues 
concerning the craft, thought, and professional 
expectations of a multimedia artist/designer 
will be the content of this course. Topics 
related to the multimedia industries in general 
and the instructor's specific industry experi- 
ence will be discussed. Readings, discussion, 
and a practical presentation or project will 
make up the body of this course. 
Prerequisite: MM 350. or permission of the 
instructor. 
Open only to Multimedia majors. 

MM 499 

Multimedia Internship 

3 credits, 90 hours/semester 

Students are placed with regional companies 

to expose them to a real work environment in 

the fields of multimedia, web design and 

information. 



Museum Studies 



MS 501 

Museum Seminar: The Museum 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Lecture/seminar course exploring the history, 
organization, and operation of the museum as 
a cultural/educational institution, an economic 
entity, and a management enterprise. Visiting 
lecturers bring a wide range of knowledge and 
practices from their respective institutions and 
consultancies to provide the student with 
insight into the differences between museums 
of different types, sizes, and missions. The 
course provides students with an overall 
understanding of the museum as an institution 
and an introduction to the many roles played 
by museum professionals. 
Prerequisite: Upperclass undergraduate or graduate 
standing. 

MS 502 

Museum Seminar: The Exhibition 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Lecture/seminar course exploring the philos- 
ophy and history of museum exhibitions and 
the development of the museum exhibition 
form. Visiting lecturers bring a wide range of 
knowledge and practices from their respective 
professional disciplines and provide insight 
into museum exhibition practice. Provides stu- 
dents with an overall understanding of the role 
exhibitions can and do play in public institu- 
tions. Offered in the evening. Priority for 
enrollment is given to graduate stadents in the 
Museum Education, Museum 
Communication, and MEPD programs. 
Prerequisite: Upperclass undergraduate or graduate 
standing. 

MS 508 

The Museum Audience 

3 credits, 3 hours ' 

Lecture course focusing on museum commu- 
nications and learning, identifying the 
characteristics of the museum visitor, the ways 
in which visitors experience museum exhibi- 
tions, cognitive and affective behavior, the 
relationship of museum exhibitions and edu- 
cational programming, and the impact of 
museum visitor studies on the planning and 
design of museum exhibitions and the envi- 
ronment. 

Prerequisite: Upperclass undergraduate or graduate 
.•itaiiding. 



MS 510 

Museum Education Practicum 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Develops the practiced insight and skills 
needed as a professional in a museum environ- 
ment with all age groups. Provides 
opportunities for preliminary observations and 
experience with professional museum educa- 
tors and directors. The seminar is conducted in 
conjunction with museum visits and visiting 
lecturers. Through this process, students study 
dynamic teaching techniques, which explore 
and interpret information, concepts, and cul- 
tural values of a museum collection. Hands-on 
techniques and experiences with curriculum 
development and methodology prepare stu- 
dents for research and internships. 

MS 600 
Museology 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Introduction to the social and cultural theory 
underlying museum practice. The museum is 
studied as a dynamic institution. Its structure 
and functions are examined in the context of 
political, economic, and social change. A sem- 
inar/lecture course, students study the writings 
of the founders of modern museum theory 
focusing on the development of museums and 
their service to the public, learning as a central 
focus of contemporary museums, and the shift 
from private to public support and responsi- 
bility for museums. 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing, or admission to a 
Museum Studies program. 

MS 601 

Issues in Museums Seminar 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Presents and discusses current political and 
social issues, which may unexpectedly and 
sometimes problematically affect museum 
practice, particularly in the public areas of 
exhibition, programming, and publications. 
Recent examples would include controversial 
exhibits: legal, gender, race, cuhural, and reli- 
gious issues impacting museums: and the 
public right to participate in the museum 
experience as an active contributor. Museum 
scholars, specialists, and university faculty 
offer in-depth examination of current topics. 
Students complete projects designed to 
develop professional ability to deal with 
emerging debates in the museum profession 
and the knowledge of the impact of politics 
and the mass culture on museum policies and 
practices. 
Prerequisite: MS 600. 



176 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



MS 602 

Museum Governance: Legal Issues, 

Ethics and Museums 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Legal status of the museum and its obligations 
to the public, governance, staffing, and policy- 
making as a nonprofit organization. 
Establishing collections policies, laws, regula- 
rions, conventions, and codes that affect 
acquisidons, deaccessions, loans, and collec- 
tions care. The case study method is used to 
examine the issues, the law. and the decisions 
that affect today's museums. State, federal, 
and international legislation, common law, 
and the applications of administrative law in 
museums are examined. Examines the com- 
plex reladons of museums and museum 
professionals with trustees, collectors, donors, 
dealers, outside interest groups, and artists. 
Prerequisite: MS 600. 

MS 610 A/B 

Museum Exhibition Design Studio 

6 credits. 12 hours 

The primary vehicle for exploring and devel- 
oping museum exhibition planning, design, 
project organizadon, and presentation skills 
and techniques. 
Prerequisite: Admission to MEPD program. 

MS 615 

Educational Programming for 

Museums and Alternative Sites 

3 credits. 3 hours 

Prepares museum educators for the develop- 
ment of educational programs and plans for 
diverse types of museums and alternative 
learning sites. Exposes students to current 
issues and trends in museum education such 
as interdisciplinary and integrated learning, 
and issues of diversity. Methods of inter- 
predng works of art. artifacts, and collections 
are studied. Extensive "theory into practice" 
component provides students with the oppor- 
tunity to apply theory to actual permanent 
coUecdon and temporary exhibition projects at 
area museums. 
Prerequisite: MS 508. 



MS 619 

Video, Film, and Technology for 

Museum Interpretation 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Students become familiar with important his- 
torical, philosophical, and site-based 
interpretive uses of media in museum settings 
through a pracdcum that includes analysis of 
media (video, film, and technology) in trans- 
ferring knowledge and information in the 
museum environment. Relates the artisdc, his- 
torical, and content to the techniques of a 
variety of moving image and multimedia 
approaches. Research, planning, supervision, 
outsourcing, and execution of media pieces 
for museum environments are explored. 
Prerequisite: Admission to a Museum Studies pro- 
gram and computer literacy. 

MS 620 A 
Museum Graphics 

1.5 credits. 3 hours 

Writing, design, and production of museum 
graphic components. Graphic Design is 
defined as any visual information in museums 
that is two-dimensional rather than three. 
Corequisite: EM 21 1 or competence in computer 
desktop applications. 

MS 620 B 
Museum Lighting 

1.5 credits, 3 hours 

A lecture/demonstration/workshop course 
dealing with the use of lighting and color in 
the museum environment. 
Prerequisite: Admission to a Museum Studies pro- 
gram, or MS 620 A. 

MS 621 

Publications, Public Relations, 

and Marlceting 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Organizational principles and practices as they 
relate to the processes of public relations and 
museum communication (primarily print 
media). Topics include public relations, inter- 
pretive and informational publications, 
advertising, identity, audience development, 
and marketing. Addresses the use and creation 
of publications, marketing plans, instimtion 
and exhibition-based public relations, the cre- 
ation of effective identity programs, and 
audience development through membership 
and outreach programs. In a workshop setting, 
students learn to create effective publications 
and print media, and discuss Web-based com- 
munication. Students work under the guidance 
of a university professor and visiting experts 
in the museum field. 
Prerequisite: MS 620 A or equivalent experience. 



MS 622 

Media for Museum Communication 

3 credits. 3 hours 

Laboratory/workshop course on utilization of 
appropriate technological media, with 
emphasis on the creation of visitor interaction. 
Prerequisite: Admission to museum programs. 
Computer literacy, familiarity mth Macintosh 
System 9 required. 

MS 623 A 

Exhibition Materials and Methods 

1 .5 credits. 3 hours 

Demonstration/studio course directed at the 
problems of working with basic materials, 
methods, and tools of exhibition fabrication 
and study of the characteristics of these mate- 
rials, methods, and tools. 
Prerequisite: Admission to a .Museum Studies pro- 
gram, or MS 620 AIB. 

MS 623 B 

Exhibition Materials and Methods 

1.5 credits. 3 hours 

Demonstration/studio course directed at the 
problems of exhibit production, the choice of 
materials and methods, suppliers of materials 
and services, and the use of CAD (computer- 
aided design). 
Prerequisite: MS 623 A . 

MS 648 

Graduate Museum Project 

3 credits. 3 hours 

Culminating research project concerning 
museum studies, management, and education. 
The project is completed in one semester and 
includes the study of research in the field, a 
team project with the Museum Exhibition and 
Planning program, and an individual project 
related to the student's main area of interest 
within the museum profession. Provides 
preparatory research for the culminating 
museum internship (MS 658). 
Prelcorequisites: MS 510. MS 622. MS 501 , and 
MS 508 (except MEPD students) . 



The University of tiie Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



177 



MS 650 

Development, Fundraising, and 

Grantsmanship 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Introduction to the organizational develop- 
ment principles as they relate to fundraising 
and grant writing process. Addresses the 
changing nature of funding for contemporary 
museums, and sources of funds. The need and 
methods for developing new forms of public 
programming and communication to achieve 
direct public support of the museum will be 
addressed. In a workshop setting, students 
learn current techniques for formulating insti- 
tutional funding requests under the guidance 
of an instructor and visiting experts in the 
museum field. Students will acquire profes- 
sional knowledge of museum practices in 
development and revenue generation; and 
skills in developing a master plan and carrying 
out its elements for specific institutions and 
for specific funding objectives. 
Prerequisite: MS 501 or MS 600. 

MS 651 

Collections Management and 

Computer Applications in Museums 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Students acquire the skills and knowledge 
necessary to develop, implement, and super- 
vise collections management projects. 
Emphasizes data processing applications 
related to collections management, documen- 
tation, and other museum functions, including 
collections administration, loans requests, 
rights and reproductions, exhibition planning 
and design, publications, collections security, 
and project management. Topics include mul- 
timedia and digital imaging, graphics, and 
database development and processing stan- 
dards. Instruction in computer languages, 
database development and use, and digital 
imaging. Word processing experience and 
access to a computer are expected. Database 
management experience is helpful. 
Prereqiiisiles: MS 600, and a general level of com- 
puter competence. 



MS 658 

Museum Education Internship 

6 credits (or 3 credits per semester for 
Museum Education students) 
Taken in a cooperating museum, the internship 
represents full-time employment equivalency 
under the mentorship of a professional 
museum educator. It is intended to provide 
practical on-site experience in which the 
intern is integrated into the museum staff, 
assuming professional-level responsibilities 
and experience. A University professor also 
observes, advises, and assesses the student 
during the internship. 
Prerequisites: MS 510. MS 501, MS 508. 

MS 710 

Museum Exhibition Design Studio 

6 credits. 6 hours 

The primary vehicle for exploring and 

developing museum exhibition planning, 

design, project organization, and presentation 

skills and techniques. 

Prerequisites: MS 501 and MS610B. 

MS 740 
Thesis Research 

3 credits. 3 hours 

Examines the principal approaches to 
research. The nature of appropriate research 
methods for selected thesis topics; the 
approaches and benefits of various methodolo- 
gies; and the steps in research design. Students 
identify a research problem, design a study, 
collect and analyze data, compile, interpret, 
and report the results. 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing, and completion 
of or eiuvllment in MS 501 , MS 502, MS 600, 
or MS 648. 

MS 749 A/B 
Thesis Development 

6 credits (or 3 credits per semester for 
MEPD students) 

3 credits (or 1.5 credits per semester for 
Museum Communication students) 
Independent research and design in an area 
supporting the student's career objectives and 
interests. 

Prerequisites for MEPD students: MS 502 and 
MS610AIB. 

Prerequisites for Museutn Communication stu- 
dents: MS 501, MS 508, MS 600. 



MS 759 

Graduate Museum Internship 

3 credits, 90 hours/semester 
A three-month supervised practicum in a 
cooperating museum, the internship represents 
full-time employment equivalency under the 
mentorship of a professional museum edu- 
cator. Provides practical on-site experience, in 
which the intern is integrated into the museum 
staff, assuming professional-level responsibili- 
ties and experience. A University professor 
also observes, advises, and asses.ses the stu- 
dent during the internship. 
Prerequisite for Museum Exhibition Planning 
and Design: 15 credits in Museum Studies. 
Prerequisites for Museimi Communication: MS 
501, MS 508, and MS 600. 
Prerequisites for Museum Education Students: 
MS510,MS501,andMS508. 
Open to Museum Studies majors only. 



178 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



Music 



WIU 007 A/B 

Introduction to Music Theory 

3 credits, 4.5 hours 

Fundamentals of music theory, designed to 
introduce students to the basic principles of 
theory and harmony. 

MU 010, MU 020, MU 030 
Jury Examination 

credits 

MU 040 
Senior Recital 

credits 

MU 100 

Major Worl<shop 

1 credit, 1.5 hours 

Students, grouped by major, learn and practice 
aspects of performance including technique, 
literature, sight-reading, and improvisation. 
Students perform individually and in groups. 
Open to Music majors only. 

MU 103 A/B 
Musicianship I, II 

3 credits, 3 hours 

The establishment of fundamental skills 
through the singing and recognition of dia- 
tonic materials, i.e., scales, intervals, triads, 
and seventh chords, both as isolated phe- 
nomena and in musical contexts. Solfeggio 
performance of diatonic melodies and 
rhythmic performance in all basic meters are 
emphasized, as well as the dictation of these 
materials. 
Permission of instructor is required. 

MU 107 A/B 
Music Theory I, II 

3 credits. 3 hours 

An introduction to basic theory. Includes the 

study of scales, intervals, chords of various 

types, harmonic progression, and the analysis 

of small musical forms. 

Permission of instructor is required. 

MU 111 A/B 

Composition Class for Non-Majors 

1 credit. 1 hour 

Students develop basic skills in various 
aspects of composition, including form, 
melody, harmony, rhythm, color, texture, 
notation, improvisation, and orchestration. 



MU 113 

Freshman Improvisation 

1 credit. 1 .5 hours 

Introductory-level jazz improvisation dealing 
with linear, melodic, harmonic, and rhythmic 
fundamentals of improvisation, as well as the 
interactive and group aspects. Lecture and 
skills development with a performance base. 
Open to Music majors only. 

MU 115, MU 116 

Music Technology Survey 

1 credit. 1 hour 

Provides students with a working knowledge 
of music technology practices, definitions, and 
concepts. Through both lecture and lab 
classes, students become familiar with a cross- 
section of hardware and software currently in 
use by the school and working professionals. 

MU 121 
Calligraphy 

1 credit. 1 hour 

Professional methods of musical score and 
part preparation, both in the traditional way 
with paper and pen, and with computer pro- 
grams. An elective for all majors. 
Prerequisite: MU 107 B or permission of instructor 

MU 123 A/B 

Guitar Class for Non-Majors 

1 credit, 1 hour 

One hour class of instruction in contemporary 
guitar. Course covers basic technique 
including fingering, scales, chords, and 
chord melodies. 

MU 124 A/B 

Drum Class for Non-Majors 

1 credit. 1 hour 

Drum set instnjction in basic technique and 
contemporary styles including rock, jazz, 
and Latin. 

MU 125 A/B 

Brass Class for Non-Majors 

1 credit, 1 hour 

Designed for students with little or no experi- 
ence or formal training. Students will learn 
basic breathing, embouchure, and reading 
techniques. 

MU 126 A/B 

Saxophone Class for Non-Majors 

1 credit, 1 hour 

Introductory class in saxophone techniques, 
embouchure, sound production, breathing, fin- 
gering, and literature. 



MU 127 A/B 

Flute Class for Non-Majors 

1 credit. 1 hour 

Provides the student with a solid introduction 
to tone and technique development and reper- 
toire for the flute. 

MU 130 A/B 

Piano Class for Non-Majors 

1 credit. 1 hour 

Instruction in traditional beginning piano. 
Coursework includes basic technique 
including scales, chords, and chord melodies. 

MU 131 A/B 
Class Piano I, II 

1 credit, 1 hour 

Introductory and elementary keyboard 
training using theoretical, harmonic, and tech- 
nical concepts in practical keyboard 
application: transposition, melody harmoniza- 
tion, elementary improvisation, technique, and 
repertoire. 
Open to Music majors only 

MU 139, MU 140 
Styles and Diction 

1 credit, 1 hour 

Required of all vocal majors. Students prac- 
tice English and Italian diction, and perform 
for faculty and guests in a variety of musical 
styles. 
Open to Music majors only 

MU 141 A/B 

Voice Class for Non-Majors 

1 credit. 1 hour 

Voice instruction using traditional methods. 
Course covers proper technique of breathing, 
support, focus of tone, production of clear 
vocal line, and some musical interpretation 
of literature. 

MU 149 A/B 
Aural Concepts 

3 credits, 3 hours 

For non-Music majors. An introduction to the 
use of music and sound as components of 
multimedia and their potential for enhancing 
communication. Recognizing the special 
background and needs of the non-music major 
student, examines the fundamentals of music 
and sound, their potential relationship to the 
visual image, and the technology necessary to 
implement that relationship. 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 179 



MU 151 A/B 

Introduction - Music Education 

1 credit. 1 hour 

A two-semester sequence required of all stu- 
dents in the MATPREP program, and open to 
any student interested in exploring Music 
Education as a career option. Survey course 
designed to provide an overview of music 
teaching- past, present, and future, and to 
serve as an introduction to the philosophy, 
methodology, and professional role of the 
music teacher. i 

Open to Music majors only. 

MU 190 A/B 

Applied Instruction Non-Majors 

1.5 credits, 0.5 hour 

Private instruction in all instrumental, vocal, 

and composition areas. 

Permission of instructor is required. 

MU 191 A/B - MU 591 A/B 
Applied Major Instruction: Voice 

3 credits, 1 hour 

Private instruction in voice. 

Open to Music majors only. 

MU 192 A/B - MU 592 A/B 
Applied Major Instruction: 
Instrumental 

3 credits, 1 hour 

Private instruction in instrumental area. 

Open to Music majors only. 

MU 193 A/B - MU 593 A/B 
Applied Major Instruction: 
Composition 

3 credits, 1 hour 

Private instruction in composition. 

Open to Music majors only. 

MU 208 A/B 
JazzTheory I, II 

3 credits. 3 hours 

A study of diatonic and chromatic theory as 
related to jazz and contemporary music. 
Prerequisite: MU 107 B or permission of instructor 

MU 209 A/B 

Jazz Ear Training I, II 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Melodic, harmonic, and rhythmic aural skill 

development in the jazz and contemporary 

music idioms. 

Prerequisite: MU 103 B or permission of instructor 



MU 213 A/B 

Jazz Improvisation I, II 

2 credits. 3 hours 

The application of improvisational techniques 
encompassing all standard forms and styles. 
Performance practices are related to the indi- 
vidual student's abiUties. background, and 
experience. Coursework includes solo tran- 
scription and analysis, a comparison of 
improvisational methods, and a survey of edu- 
cational resources. 

Prerequisites: MU 103 B and MU 107 B, or permis- 
sion of instructor 
Open to Music majors only 

MU 232 A/B 

Class Jazz Piano!, II 

1 credit. I hour 

Harmonic concepts in keyboard application 
for jazz and contemporary music, chord 
voicings for popular tunes, standards, and 
original harmonizations. 
Prerequisite: MU 131 B. 
Open to Music majors only 

MU 241 A/B 

Vocal Styles and Diction I, II 

2 credits, 2 hours 

Brings together Vocal majors to expose them 
to the wide variety of literature and styles 
required of professionals. Students perform 
and are critiqued by faculty and guests. 
English, Italian, French, and German diction 
are studied. 

Prerequisites: MU 13 1 B and MU 140. 
Open to Vocal majors only. 

MU 254 

Basic Conducting 

2 credits, 2 hours 

A study of fundamental conducting skills and 
techniques with emphasis upon physical 
aspects of conducting, score reading and 
preparation, and rehearsal principles. 
Open to Music majors only 

MU 257 A/B 
LabTeaching/Practicum I, II 

2 credits, 2 hours 

Observation and introduction to teaching in 

the schools. Course includes field experience 

as well as classroom seminars. 

Open to Music majors only. 



MU 301 A/B 
Music History I, II 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Designed to define the major style periods 
from ancient Greece to the present in terms of 
their philosophies, accomplishments, and 
interrelationships. Composers, performers, 
and theorists are examined in the context of 
musical literature with emphasis upon styles, 
forms, and techniques of composifion as they 
evolve and change. The sequence puts into 
historical perspective the materials presented 
in the Music Theory courses. Through lis- 
tening assignments, students are expected to 
further develop their aural skills and knowl- 
edge of musical literature. 
Discipline History I Humanities 

MU 306 A/B 

History of Rock Music 

3 credits. 3 hours 

The history of Rock from its inception in the 

1950s to the present. Beginning with the 

important antecedents of Rock and Roll, the 

course historically traces the various styles 

that evolved from that time to the present. 

There are live demonstrations and illustrations 

by guests in class. May be taken for elective 

credit. 

Humanities 

MU 307 A/B 
Advanced jazz Theory 
and Ear Training 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Practical study of jazz and pop theory com- 
bined with an advanced ear-training program, 
emphasizing performance application. 
Students are required to bring their instru- 
ments to class. Coursework includes 
recognidon, writing, dictafion, and sight 
reading of advanced chords, chord additions 
and alteraUons, chord substitutions, progres- 
sions, and rhythm. 
Prerequisite: MU 208 B. 
Open to Music majors only 

MU 308 A/B 

Analysis and Composition of 

Contemporary Music 

1.5 credits, 1.5 hours 

Examination of compositional techniques 
used in pop songs, jingles, soundtracks, and 
underscores for radio, TV, records, films, 
shows and industrials. Students investigate the 
ways in which music serves to enhance the 
overall goals of the product or project. 
Musical analysis demonstrates how each style 
is created. Students produce their own musical 
compositions in each media context. 
Prerequisite: MU 208 B. 
Open to Music majors only 



i8o 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



MU 309 

Advanced Rhythmic Skills 

1 credits, 1.5 hours 

This is a skills-based class intended to 
advance the student's rhythmic understanding 
and performance abilities as applied to solo 
and sectional playing and singing, as well as 
improvisation, reading, arranging, tran- 
scribing, and composing. Subject matter is 
derived from and applies to comtemporary 
American and Latin popular and art music. 
Prerequisites: MU 208 B.MU 209 B and 
MU213B. 

MU 310, MU 311 
Transcription and Analysis 

1 credit, 1.5 hours 

Designed to advance the skills of ear training, 
theory, and improvisation using transcription, 
analysis, and composition. Students transcribe 
and compose melodies, rhythms, harmonies 
and arrangements, in increasingly complex 
forms. The musical theory underlying each 
piece is discussed and sometimes performed 
and used as a basis for further work. 
Prerequisites: MU 208 B. MU209 B, ami MU 2)3 B 

MU 313 A/B 

Jazz Improvisation III, IV 

2 credits, 2 hours 
Continuation of MU 2 1 3 A/B . 
Prerequisite: MU 213 B. 

Open to Music majors only. 

MU 315 A/B 
Jazz Arranging 1, 11 

2 credits, 2 hours 

A functional approach to ensemble scoring 
including score analysis, combo arranging, 
arranging for mixed instrumentation, musical 
settings for vocalists, string writing, writing 
for pop recording, and special techniques for 
multi-track recording. 
Prerequisites: MU 208 B and MU209B. 

MU317A 
Orchestration 1 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Introduction to instrumentation, designed to 
acquaint the student with ranges, transposi- 
tions, functions, and characteristics of 
individual instruments and voices. Aural and 
score analysis provide the basis for under- 
standing of vocal and instrumental treatments 
in small and large ensembles. Written orches- 
trations are required. 
Prerequisite: MU 208 B. 
Open to Music majors only. 



MU 317 B 
Orchestration 11 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Primarily intended for composers, this course 

presents an analytical history of orchestration. 

Coursework culminates in a large project that 

is scored and critiqued. Composers 

are encouraged to orchestrate their own 

compositions. 

Prerequisite: MU 208 B and MU 317 A. 

Open to Music majors only 

MU 331 A/B 

Advanced Piano and Accompanying 

1 credit, 1 hour 

Designed for all music majors, this course 
continues in the development of piano tech- 
niques with an emphasis on learning 
self-accompaniment. Literature from all vocal 
areas is practiced including oratorio, musical 
theater, jazz, opera, and contemporary. 
Students also accompany other singers. 
Prerequisite: MU232 B. 

MU 341 A/B 

Vocal Styles and Diction Ml, IV 

2 credits, 2 hours 
Continuation ofMU 241 A/B. 
Prerequisite: MU 241 B. 

MU 344 A/B 
Opera Staging 1, 11 

2 credits, 3 hours 

The interpretation and pertbrmance of opera 

roles. Technical and artistic preparation for 

public performance from workshops to major 

productions of full operas. 

Permission of instructor is required. 

MU 347 A/B 

Advanced Sight Reading 

1 credit, 1 hour 

An advanced music reading course designed 
to further develop the student's music reading, 
writing, recognition, and inner-ear skills. 
Prerequisite: MU 209 Bar TH 2^2 B. 

MU 348 A/B 
Vocal Improvisation 

2 credits, 2 hours 

Develops improvisation skills for vocal 
majors through the study of advanced vocal 
techniques, transcription, theory and analysis, 
and metric concepts. 

Open to Music majors only, or with permission 
of instructor 



MU 356 A/B 

Music Teaching Sl<ills 1, 11 

1 credit. 1 hour 

Incorporates advanced skills in functional 
piano, guitar, recorder, writing/arranging for 
elementary classroom ensembles, handbells, 
establishment of classroom environment. 
Projects include arranging, pertbrming, and 
simulated teaching. 
Open to Music majors only 

MU390 

Introduction to Acoustics 

3 credit. 3 hours 

This course deals with the physical nature of 
sound, the reception and perception of sound, 
theories of consonance and dissonance, scales 
tunings and temperaments, the acoustic prop- 
erties of musical instruments, electronic 
instruments and the voice, sound reinforce- 
ment, and environmental considerations. 
Open to all students. 
Science/Math 

MU 401 A 
Jazz History 

3 credits. 3 hours 

Study of jazz from its African and European 
roots through its emergence at the turn of the 
20th century as a unique and distinctive 
American art form. The various styles of jazz 
are studied (ragtime. New Orieans Dixieland, 
Chicago style, swing, be-bop, cool, hard bop, 
free-form, third stream), including their effect 
on the popular music with which jazz has 
coexisted. An in-depth study of the primary 
exponents of the various styles. Audio and 
video materials are used to provide students 
with a better understanding of jazz and its 
influences on the music industry. 
Prerequisites: MU 208 B. MU 209 B. and 
MU2I3 B, or permission of the instructor 
Discipline History /Humanities 

MU 401 B 

American Music History 

3 credits, 3 hours 

The development of both classical and popular 
American musical styles from the 17th to the 
20th century. Recordings and films as well as 
in-class performances will help bring to life 
the music of our American past. Students gain 
a clear understanding of the social, historical 
and musical time line that evolved into our 
current musical environment. 
Humanities/Art History 



The University of tiie Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



181 



MU402 
World Music 

3 credits, 3 hours 

The classical and folk music of various coun- 
tries in Asia. Indonesia, the Middle East, 
Africa, and the Western Hemisphere. Course 
open to all University students, which may be 
taken for Music or Liberal Arts credit. 
Humanities 

MU406 

Advanced Rhythmic Theory 

and Practice 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Study of the rhythmic theories and practices 

of such composers as Hindemith, Messiaen, 

Stravinsky, Carter, Reich, Bartok, and 

Babbitt, as well as other contemporary and 

jazz composers. 

Prerequisites: MU 208 B, MU 209 B. and MU 213 B. 

Open to Music majors only. 

MU408 

Form and Analysis 

3 credits, 3 hours 

This course serves as a continuation of the 
theory work of the freshman year. It is an 
enhanced study of classical theory designed to 
prepare students for graduate work and for the 
teacher certification examinations. The 
emphasis is on harmonic forms and those built 
upon ostinati principles. The literature for 
study is drawn from all musical periods. 
Prerequisite: MU 107 B. 

MU 409 
Contrapuntal Theory and Analysis 

3 credits, 3 hours 

A continuation of freshman theory courses 
taken by instrumental, vocal, and composidon 
majors. It is designed to enhance basic clas- 
sical theory skills; to prepare for graduate 
level theory work; and to meet the require- 
ments on the theory portions of the teacher 
certification examination. The course centers 
on contrapuntal organization and contrapuntal 
devices. The literature is drawn from all 
musical periods. Harmony, rhythm, melody, 
and timbre are discussed as they relate to 
specific compositions. Requirements include 
analytical study, out-of-class listening and 
research, and written contrapuntal 
assignments. 
Prerequisites: MU 107 A and MU 107 B. 



MU411 

2oth Century Music 

3 credits, 3 hours 

A study and analysis of the music of the first 

half of the 20th century, by composers such as 

Schonberg, Berg, Webern, Stravinsky, 

Hindemith, Varese, Bartok, Copland, and 

Messiaen. 

Prerequisites: MU 208 B. MU209 B. and MU 213 B 

or permission of the instructor. 

Humanities 

MU413 A/B 
Recording!, II 

2 credits, 2 hours 

Study of the recording process and the many 
facets of the recording studio. Designed to 
familiarize the student with conventional and 
creative recording techniques through prac- 
tical experience in the studio. 

MU 415 A/B 

Introduction to MIDI and 
Electronic Technology 

3 credits. 3 hours 

Detailed, applied examination of the use of 
microcomputers in the present-day composi- 
tion environment. The course includes the 
uses of the computer, the language of MIDI, 
sequencing, FM and other types of synthesis, 
and a survey of currently available music soft- 
ware packages. Students are strongly 
encouraged to engage in independent work 
based on their own compositional interests. 
No prior computer or synthesis experience is 
needed. 

MU 416 A/B 
MIDI Synthesis i, II 

1.5 credits. 0.75 hour 

Students become proficient at the skills neces- 
sary to work creatively in the MIDI studio. 
Current synthesis methods and programming 
of original sounds and drum machines; sam- 
pling procedures; collecting and editing 
original samples; MIDI studio recording 
processes; the use of sync codes. 
Prerequisite: MU 415 B. 

MU 417 A/B 
Opera Literature 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Survey of operatic styles and genres. 
Emphasis on the cultural and social contexts 
of a wide diversity of operas, and upon char- 
acter analysis. Intensive examination of 
complete operas. 

Open to all University students for free elective or 
Liberal Arts credit. 
Humanities 



MU 420 A 
Business of Music 

2 credits. 2 hours 

Examination of the legal, pracdcal, and proce- 
dural problems encountered by the practicing 
musician. Content includes the study of music 
publishing, recording contracts, and copyright 
and intellectual property rights issues. 

MU 420 B 
Careers in Music 

2 credits. 2 hours 

Study in the career options available to musi- 
cians and the knowledge and craft necessary 
for the successful recognition and exploitation 
of these opportunities. 
Open to Music majors only 

MU 424 

Wagner and the Ring Cycle 

3 credits, 3 hours 

An in-depth study of Wagnerian opera with 
special emphasis on the four operas that con- 
stitute the Ring Cycle. Lectures and 
discussions will cover libretti, harmonic 
idiom, staging, and symbolism. 
Open to all University studems for free elective or 
Liberal Arts credit. 

MU427 

Diaghilev and His Time 

3 credits, 3 hours 

The role of Serge Diaghilev and his famous 
Ballet Russes in shaping the course of music 
and dance from 1909-1929. Special emphasis 
on the works of Igor Stravinsky with reference 
to his music for the stage. The interrelation- 
ships between various artists, dancers, and 
writers such as Picasso, Cocteau. Nijinsky, 
Bakst, Massine, and others who were active in 
Paris. Works are examined from the perspec- 
tive of the composer, the choreographer, the 
set and costume designer, the dancers and the 
audience. Literature includes Stravinsky 
{Firebird, Petrushka, Rite of Spring. Les 
Npces. Piilcinella, Oedipus Re.x). Debussy 
(Jeiix). Ravel {Daphnis and Chloe). Satie 
(Parade), De Falla (The Three-Comered Hat), 
Milhaud (Le Train Bleu, La Creation du 
Monde), Poulenc (Les Biches) and Prokofiev. 
Open to all University students for free elective or 
Liberal Arts credit. 



182 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



MU 441 A/B 
Vocal Workshop 

1 credit. 1 hour 

Exit-level course for vocal majors, which pre- 
pares students for the musical, career, and 
performance practices they will encounter in 
the competitive professional marketplace. 
Class includes lectures by guest singers, com- 
posers, opera and musical directors, vocal 
coaches, and record producers. 
Prerequisites: MU 331 B. MU 341 B. andMU347B 

MU 444 A/B 

Opera Staging III, IV 

2 credits. 3 hours 
Continuation of MU 344 A/B. 
Prerequisite: MU 344 B. 

MU 451 A 

Psychology of Music Teaching I 

2 credits. 2 hours 

Acquaints the prospective music educator 
with the major theories and developments 
associated with child development in physical, 
emotional, and psychological terms; and a 
volume of principles supported by psycholog- 
ical observation and investigation, which 
appear to possess import for the 
teaching/learning endeavor in music. 
Open to Music majors only. 
Social Studies 

MU 451 B 

Psychology of Music Teaching 11 

2 credits, 2 hours 

Emphasis on the application of learning theo- 
ries to practical considerations of teaching, 
including motivation, learning sequence, stu- 
dent-teacher interaction, and classroom 
management. Developmental theories, like 
those of Piaget and Erikson, are explored with 
attention to selecting learning experiences in 
the music classroom. 
Open to Music majors only. 
Social Studies 

MU499 
Internship 

1-3 credits, 30-60 hours 
An opportunity to participate in a workplace 
environment during the academic year. 
Students earn internship credit by completing 
a minimum number of hours in the field 
during the semester, and by satisfying the 
requirements of the sponsor, such as atten- 
dance, punctuality, responsibility, 
professionalism, tasks completed. Students 
may be assigned to recording studios, radio 
stations, arts organizations, or with music pub- 
lishers, entertainment attorneys, music 
therapists, or record producers. 



Master of Arts in 
Teaching in Music 
Education 

MU 550 

Advanced Conducting 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Advanced conducting techniques and applica- 
tions of these techniques to instrumental or 
choral music teaching at the secondary school 
level. Emphases include the selections of 
appropriate literature, style and interpretation, 
rehearsal planning and implementation, evalu- 
ating performance outcomes, and special 
considerations relative to the teaching of 
music through the vehicle of performance. 
Students select either instrumental or choral 
emphasis. 

Prerequisites:. 4 course in Basic Conducting and 
matriculation in the .MAT in Music program. 

MU 551 

Education in American Society 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Lecture/discussion, field research, and presen- 
tations address historical, philosophical, and 
contemporary issues in American education. 
Students are required to complete four major 
papers dedicated to the aforementioned issues 
and present them during seminar sessions. 
Assigned readings and the keeping of a note- 
book devoted to current events in education 
are required. Students are granted release time 
from class to complete research papers and are 
counselled individually to facilitate their proj- 
ects. Guest speakers typically include a school 
administrator, a counselor/social worker, a 
supervisor or teacher from a curricular area 
other than music, and related school 
personnel. 

Prerequisite: Matriculation in the MAT in Music 
program. 

MU552 

Workshop in Vocal Methods 

2 credits, 1 hour 

Instruction and participatory experiences 
in voice theory, vocal production, teaching 
methods, and instructional materials for use in 
elementary and secondary schools. The physi- 
ology of the voice is studied with reference to 
principles of choral singing. Special problems 
of the child and adolescent voice are 
considered. 

Prerequisite: .Matriculation in the .MA T in Music 
program. 



MU 553 

Music and Special Children 

2 credits, 2 hours 

Readings, discussions, guest speakers, class- 
room observations and simulated teaching 
define and examine various types of disabili- 
ties; offer a background on special education 
practices and laws in America; develop an 
appreciation of the needs of handicapped per- 
sons in general society, in education, and in 
music education; and guide music education 
students in developing goals and objectives, 
adapting lessons, and preparing meaningful 
lesson plans for special students in the music 
classroom. Participation in class discussion 
based on assigned reading, a written/verbal 
presentation on a specific disability, field 
observations, and two written examinations 
provide bases for evaluating student achieve- 
ment. 

Prerequisite: .Matriculation in the M.AT in Music 
program. 

MU 554 A 

Elementary Methods and Materials 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Concentrated study of methods and materials 
involved in planning, implementing, and eval- 
uating instructional programs in elementary 
music education. Lecture, workshop, and sim- 
ulated teaching sessions. 
Prerequisite: Matriculation in the MA T in .Music 
program. 

MU 554 B 

Secondary Methods and Materials 

3 credits. 3 hours 

Concentrated study of methods and materials 
involved in planning, implementing, and eval- 
uating instructional programs in secondary 
music education. Lecture, workshop, and sim- 
ulated teaching sessions. 
Prerequisite: Matriculation in the MAT in Music 
program. 

MU555 

Elementary Student Teaching 

4 credits: off campus at school placement 
Taken concurrently with MU 556 and 
MU 558. Offered only during the spring 
semester to students in their final semester of 
study. The equivalent of six weeks experience 
at the elementary level is required to receive 
credit for this course. Placement in schools is 
determined by the Director of Music 
Educadon. 

Prerequisite: Matriculation in the MA T in Music 
program. 



Tlie University of tlie Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



183 



MU 556 

Secondary Student Teaching 

4 credits: off campus at school placement 
Taken concurrently with MU 556 and 
MU 558. Offered only during the spring 
semester to students in their final semester of 
study. The equivalent of six weeks' experience 
at the secondary level is required to receive 
credit for this course. Placement in schools is 
determined by the Director of Music 
Education. 

Prerequisite: Matriculation in the MAT in Music 
program. 

MU557 

Music Administration and 

Supervision 

3 credits. 3 hours 

Course addresses issues and concerns of 
administering school music programs: pro- 
gram planning and development, budget and 
finance, facilities, equipment, public relations, 
scheduling, concert planning, and related mat- 
ters. Principles and methods of effective 
supervision of programs and personnel consti- 
tute a second focus of the course. 
Prerequisite: Matriculation in the MAT in Music 
program. 

MU 558 

Student Teaching Seminar and 

Major Project 

2 credits, 2 hours 

Taken concurrently with MU 555 and 
MU 556. Required of and limited to students 
who are student teaching. Discussion and 
analysis of field experiences, special work- 
shops, and field trips. Major paper comprises 
a thorough status study and evaluation of the 
programs in which each student is interning. 
Successful completion of an oral exit exami- 
nation is required. 

Prerequisite: Matriculation in the MA T in Music 
program. 



MU 559 

Research, Evaluation, and 

Technology in Music Education 

3 credits. 3 hours 

The course has three foci; 

1 . Examination of the role of research in 
music education, sources of research, analysis 
of research types and methods, and the criti- 
cism of research in terms of internal and 
external criteria. 

2. Principles of effective evaluation strategies 
in music education; standardized and teacher- 
constructed approaches to evaluating music 
teaching; and learning in the cognitive, psy- 
chomotor, and affective domains. 

3. Study of computer applications and related 
technological advances relative to the 
teaching and administration of programs 

in music education. 

Prerequisite: Matriculation in the MAT in Music 

program. 

MU 560 A 

Worl<shop in Instrumental 

Methods 1 

2 credits. 2 hours 

Performing on brass and percussion instru- 
ments and teaching brass and percussion in 
elementary and secondary schools. The class 
will constitute a lab ensemble for exploring 
methods and materials. Full class sessions 
supplemented with small-group instruction. 
Clinics focus on instrument care and repair, 
instrument selection, developing beginning 
instrumental programs in schools, and related 
issues. 

Prerequisite: Matriculation in the MAT in Music 
program. 

MU 560 B 

Workshop in Instrumental 

Methods 11 

2 credits. 2 hours 

Instruction and participatory experiences in 
performing on woodwind and string instru- 
ments and teaching woodwinds and strings in 
elementary and secondary schools. The class 
will constitute a lab ensemble for exploring 
methods and materials. Full class sessions are 
supplemented with small-group instruction. 
Clinics focus on instrument care and repair, 
instrument selection, developing beginning 
instrumental programs in schools, and related 
issues. 

Prerequisite: Matriculation in the MAT in Music 
program. 



Master of Music in 
Jazz Studies 

MU603 

Graduate Project/ Recital 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Independent research project designed to 
enable the student to work in depth on a topic 
of special relevance applicable to perform- 
ance. The graduate project is evaluated in two 
parts: as a thesis, with the expectation that the 
student has completed extensive research in a 
comprehensive manner; and as a recital, in 
which the student incorporates aspects of the 
project and demonstrates personal instru- 
mental growth. Students give presentations 
throughout the semester in a seminar setting, 
showing their progress in research and its 
application to performance. 
Prerequisite: Matriculation in the Master of Music 
program. 

MU 615, MU 616 

MIDI and Music Technology 

2 credits, 2 hours 

Hands-on exploration of music technology 
applicable to performer, composer, and 
arranger, with focus on fluency with MIDI 
sequencing including MAX to create interac- 
tive live performance situations. Students 
work with modular digital multi-tracks and 
edit and create original sounds for synthe- 
sizers and samplers. Hard disk recording using 
Pro-Tools III and Digital Performer. SMPTE 
and synchronization in the studio, and compo- 
sition and sound design for film, video, and 
theater are also explored. Training in notation 
software is an integral and essential aspect of 
the course: after the first month, assignments 
for all graduate courses require use of profes- 
sional notation software. 
Prerequisite: Matriculation in the Master of Music 
program. 



184 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



MU617 

Advanced Transcription 

and Analysis 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Accurate notation, transcription fluency, and 
recognition of theoretical concepts are devel- 
oped through a regime of continual rigorous 
assignments-all designed to further advance 
skills in ear training and theory. Projects begin 
with single-line melodies in varying instru- 
mental registers and progress through 
advanced rhythms and chord progressions to 
complete arrangements and compositions. 
Sources include bass lines, synthesizer 
sequences, pop recordings, jazz improvisa- 
tions, and drum solos. Students learn 
techniques and performance practices of 
varying styles and periods, and then pertbrm 
transcribed parts and solos. 
Prerequisite: Matriculation in the Master of Music 
program. 

MU 620, MU 621 

Graduate Professional Internship 

1 credit, 15 hours/semester 

Provides hands-on, sitting-in experience in a 
variety of professional settings-rehearsals, 
pertbrmances. meetings with producers, and 
in-studio projects such as recording, 
arranging, or project coordination. The pro- 
gram is developed by the graduate advisor and 
major teacher in conjunction with the student 
to select topics and experiences most relevant 
and beneficial to that particular student's 
education. 

Prereqiiisite: Matriculation in the Master of Music 
program. 

MU622 

Graduate Arranging 

2 credits, 2 hours 

Emphasis is on effective writing in various 
contemporary styles and building on basic 
arranging skills, with a focus on specific 
arranging techniques such as writing effec- 
tively for the rhythm section, horn voicings, 
sax soli, and contemporary fusion styles. 
Arrangements are studied in score format and 
aurally, and then techniques are applied to stu- 
dent projects. 

Prerequisite: Matriculation in the Master of Music 
program. 



MU 624 

Composing for Performers 

2 credits, 2 hours 

A dual emphasis-on acoustic instruments and 
on technologies-exposes students to a variety 
of professional composing situations, 
including large jazz ensembles, fusion, 
acoustic/electronic hybrids, films, videos, 
musical theater, and jingle writing. Techniques 
using MIDI. MAX, and electronic composi- 
tion are explored. Faculty and guest 
composers present workshops on their own 
approaches. Students learn to use the 
recording studio as an instrument and use 
notation software for score and part prepara- 
tion. Student works are rehearsed and 
performed by graduate and advanced under- 
graduate ensembles. 

Prerequisite: Matriculation in the Master of Music 
program. 

MU 625, MU 626 
Graduate Improvisation I, II 

2 credits, 2 hours 

Improvisational styles, techniques, and 
devices are studied. Intervallic improvisation, 
modem triad improvisation, and advanced 
pentatonic concepts are addressed, as well as 
study of the pioneers of jazz improvisation 
through recorded solos that mark turning 
points of improvisation. Topics include 
melody embellishment, improvising in 
phrases, silence, time-feel, pacing, syncopa- 
tion, chord tone soloing, dynamics, 
non-harmonic triads, contracting and 
expanding chord duration, tri-tonic cells, sus- 
taining peak points, and unaccompanied 
soloing. 

Prerequisite: Matriculation in the Master of Music 
program. 

MU 627, MU 628 
Graduate Forum 

1 credit. 1 hour 

Seminar where various aspects of study, 
including musical development and accom- 
plishment, are correlated with critical, 
aesthetic, and historical components. 
Additionally, artistic and professional issues 
are researched and discussed, and guest artists 
and professionals conduct master classes and 
workshops. A module on research techniques 
is included. 

Prerequisite: Matriculation in the Master of Music 
program. 



Music Ensembles 

BM and MM students participate in a range of 
ensembles selected for their diversity of style 
and instrumentation, designed to present 
varied musical experiences. Each ensemble is 
directed by a faculty artist expert in the 
selected idiom. 

MU 761 
Handbell Choir 

1 credit 

Permission of instructor is required. 

MU 762 

Chamber Singers Ensemble 

1 credit 

Permission of instructor is required. 

MU764 

Small Jazz Ensemble 

1 credit 

Permission of instructor is required. 

Required of all MM in Jazz Studies majors. 

MU 765 

New Music Ensemble 

1 credit 

Permission of instructor is required. 

MU 772 
Chorus 

1 credit 

Permission of instructor is required. 

MU 774 

Large jazz Ensemble 

1 credit 

Permission of instructor is required. 

Private Lessons 

The following course.^ are open to Music 
majors only. 

MU 191 A/B 

Major Lessons (Vocal) 

3 credits 

MU 192 A/B 

Major Lessons (Instrumental) 

3 credits 

MU 193 A/B 

Major Lessons (Composition) 

3 credits 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



185 



MU 291 A/B 

Major Lessons (Vocal) 

3 credits 
Prereqiiisiw: MU 191 B. 

MU 292 A/B 

Major Lessons (Instrumental) 

3 credits 
Pm-equishe:MU 192B. 

MU 293 A/B 

Major Lessons (Composition) 

3 credits 
Prerequisite: MU 193 B. 

MU 391 A/B 

Major Lessons (Vocal) 

3 credits 
Prereqiiisile:MU29l B. 

MU 392 A/B 

Major Lessons (Instrumental) 

3 credits 
Prerequisite: MU 292 B. 

MU 393 A/B 

Major Lessons (Composition) 

3 credits 
Prerequisite: MU 293 B. 

MU 491 A/B 

Major Lessons (Vocal) 

3 credits 
Prerequisite: MU 391 B 

MU 492 A/B 

Major Lessons (Instrumental) 

3 credits 
Prerequisite: MU 392 B 

MU 493 A/B 

Major Lessons (Composition) 

3 credits 
Prerequisite: MU 393 B. 

MU 592 A/B 

Major Lessons (Graduate) 

3 credits 

Prerequisite: Admission to the MM program. 



Media Arts 



Photography/Film/ 
Video/Animation 

PF 125 

Freshman Photography 

1.5 credits. 3 hours 

An introduction to fundamental techniques 
used in black-and-white photography, 
including camera operation, developing, and 
printing. Lectures and presentations on the 
technical aspects of photography as well as 
the creative and conceptual aspects related to 
the field. Demonstrations on the production of 
photograms and pinhole images, the use of the 
copy stand and slide film, and a brief descrip- 
tion of different camera formats. 

PF127 

Freshman Animation 

1 .5 credits. 3 hours 

An introduction to the basics of animation, 
with an emphasis on the development of story- 
telling capabilities. Inventive studio projects 
explore production techniques used both in 
experimental and character animation. In addi- 
tion, an historical overview is provided 
through film screenings and group discussion. 

PF 128 
Freshman Film 

1 .5 credits, 3 hours 

A short survey of film and video production, 
with an emphasis on the discussion of the 
artistic possibilities inherent in this medium. 
Topics will cover elements of narrative, the 
poetics of film (eariy historical experiments, 
dream form, and visionary film), the docu- 
mentary idiom (propaganda, social analysis, 
and political activism), video as an art form 
(technology, fine art video, and performance 
art), and kinetic design in the commercial 
sector (text and moving image design, and 
kinetic structure in television commercials). 
Students write two short papers and prepare a 
treatment for a work in film or video. Studio 
assignments concentrate on storyboard devel- 
opment and group shooting projects. 



PF203 

Portfolio Documentation 

1 .5 credits, 3 hours 

The use of photography to create a portfolio of 
artwork, exhibitions, and installations is nec- 
essary for artists in all visual media. Students 
will learn how to photograph two- and three- 
dimensional artwork in a studio setting and on 
location. Instruction addresses a wide range of 
issues including: artificial and natural lighting, 
film-based and digital camera operation, 
image processing techniques, and output 
options. By participating in lectures, demon- 
strations, field trips, and shooting 
assignments, students will acquire the skills 
necessary to create a coherent visual portfolio 
of their work. 

Prerequisite: FP 111 orFP 121. or by permission of 
tlie department. 

PF209 

Photography for Illustrators 

3 credits. 6 hours 

Introduction to basic concepts and techniques 
of black-and-white photography, including 
camera operation, developing, and printing, as 
well as photographic digital imaging. 
Emphasis is placed on film selection and 
lighting for both the studio and environmental 
shooting. The fundamentals of PhotoShop are 
employed for digital image manipulation. 
Lectures and projects are designed to provide 
the tools necessary for illustrators who wish to 
use photography in their work. 
Prerequisite: FP 111 orFP 1 21, or by permission of 
tlie department. 

PF 210 A . • 

Introduction to Film I 

3 credits. 6 hours 

A hands-on introduction to the principles and 
techniques of media production: shooting 
16mm film, developing a sensitivity to the 
nuances of movement, understanding lighting 
and exposure, composition, and the logic of 
editing. A survey on the historical and aes- 
thetic development of the medium in order to 
expand the students" sense of the possibilities 
of media. 

Prerequisite: FP 121, or by permission of the 
department. 



186 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



PF 210 B 

Introduction to Film/Digital Video 

3 credits. 6 hours 

This course offers an introduction to the basic 
practices of digital video editing and further 
creative exploration of the art of mixing 
images. Students perform timing, staging, and 
blocking exercises to develop a feel for direc- 
tion, experiment with more advanced film 
strategies, learn to edit digital video, and 
investigate relationships between sound and 
image. A final project intergrates these explo- 
rations creafively. 
Prereqiiisile: PF2I0A or permission 
of tiie department. 

PF 211 A 

Introduction to Photography I 

3 credits. 6 hours 

Introduction to basic concepts, processes, and 
techniques of black-and-white photography, 
including camera operafion. exposure, dark- 
room procedures, and lighting, and the 
controlled applications of these techniques. 
Emphasis on the normative standard of photo- 
graphic rendering. 

Required for admission to all other Pholograpliy 
eomses. 

Prerequisite: FP 1 1 1 or FP 12!. or by permission of 
the department. 

PF211B 

Introduction to Photography II 

3 credits. 6 hours 

While consolidating the student's control of 
the medium, this course introduces the student 
to a departure from normative photographic 
rendering, techniques, and modes of expres- 
sion and form. Strong emphasis on 
manipulation of materials, including tradi- 
tional photographic methods as well as an 
introduction to computer manipulation. 
Prerequisite: PF 211 A. PF209, orPF220, or by 
presentation of portfolio. 

PF 212 A 

Introduction to Animation I 

3 credits, 6 hours 

Through a series of exercises concentrating on 
timing and movement, the student acquires a 
basic understanding of animation. Sound is 
introduced for the final project, which consists 
of a short, animated film shot on 16mm using 
the Oxberry camera. 
Prerequisites: FP 110 or FP 120. 



PF 212 B 

Introduction to Animation II 

3 credits. 6 hours 

The student is introduced to under-the-camera 
animation using varied mediums such as 
cutouts, sand, and painting-on-glass. All proj- 
ects are shot on 16mm using the Bolex 
camera. The final project may consist of any 
medium selected by the student. A lab fee is 
required for this course in order to offset the 
cost of film stock and lab expenses. 
Prerequisite: PF212A.Sophmorefilm majors are 
exempt from prerequisite 

PF216 

Computer Animation I 

3 credits. 6 hours 

Introductory course in computer animation. 
Emphasis is placed upon developing the stu- 
dent's expertise with computer hardware, 
software tools, and the video utilized in cre- 
ating electronic images that move. 
Prerequisite: FP 1 11 orFP 121, or by permission of 
the department. 

PF217 

Color Concepts 

3 credits. 6 hours 

Introduction to methods of color shooting and 
printing leading to an exploration of the tech- 
nical and creative possibilities of color in 
photography. Processes covered include 
negative and transparency films, filtration, 
chemical printing, and digital color controls 
with PhotoShop. 
Prerequisite: FP 121 or by portfolio review. 

PF 218 
Creative Sound 

3 credits, 6 hours 

Exploration of the creative use of sound as a 
primary artistic medium. Topics include sound 
and hearing, microphones and recording, tape 
editing and manipulation, sound aesthetics 
and production styles, voice and narration, 
signal processing and sound manipulation, 
and production formats. Through audio pro- 
duction projects, students gain insights into 
new ways of using sound, both on its own and 
with other media. 
Prerequisite: FP 121 or permission 
of the department. 



PF219 

Character Layout and Design 

3 credits. 6 hours 

Designing characters, backgrounds, pans, and 
creative camera moves for the animated scene. 
Design styles and techniques are explored for 
their potential in developing a wide range of 
character types, traits, moods, personalities, 
and attitudes. Students learn to lay out scenes 
around character action, work with camera 
fields, deal with issues of composition and 
perspective, and create moods through layout. 
A final project requires the development of an 
"Animator's Bible." a production workbook 
for the student's personal film portfolio. 
Prerequisite: PF212A or by portfolio review. 

PF220 

Introduction to Documentary 

Photography 

3 credits. 6 hours 

Introduces students to documentary photog- 
raphy as it exists in the digital age. Topics 
covered include the history of documentary 
photography. 35mm camera operation, digital 
camera operation, and the ethical, legal, and 
strategic issues of contemporary journalism. 
Students create documentary photographic 
projects utilizing both traditional and digital 
photographic techniques. 
Prerequisite: FP 121 or MM 110. 

PF 310 A/B 

junior Cinema Production I, II 

3 credits. 6 hours 

Production techniques in actual filming situa- 
tions, starting from the script through 
budgeting, script breakdown, camera work, 
and editing, to the finished release print. 
Students are expected to execute specific 
assignments in lighting, editing, and sound, 
and are introduced to synch-sound procedures. 
Prerequisites: PF210 BforPFSIOA. 
PF310AforPF310B. 

PF 311 A/B 

Junior Photography Workshop 

3 credits, 6 hours 

Exploration of photographic imagery through 

a series of problems aimed at personal vision 

and creative growth. 

Prerequisite: PF211 Bfor PF311A. 

PFSUAforPFSIlB. 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



187 



PF 312 A/B 

Junior Animation Worlcsliop I, II 

3 credits. 6 hours 

A series of advanced drawn-animation exer- 
cises culminating in a one-minute animated 
film. A short, additional film is produced 
during the second semester. Aspects of career 
concerns in animation are introduced: grant 
writing, resume's, budgets, and the process of 
entering film festivals. The student also 
receives detailed instruction on operating the 
Oxberry camera. 
Prerequisite: PF 2 12 BforPF 312 A. 
PF312AforPF312B. 

PF 313 A/B 

Basic Pliotography Studio I, II 

3 credits. 6 hours 

Familiarizes the student with the tools, tech- 
niques, and language of studio photography. 
Entails extensive use of the 4" x 5" view 
camera. The first semester deals exclusively 
with black-and-white materials: sheet film 
exposure, hand processing, and printing large- 
format negatives. The second covers the 
introduction of color transparency films and 
strobe lighting. 

Prereqiiisile: PF2II Bfor PF3I3A. 
PF313AforPF3I3B. 

PF315 

Digital Photography Worl<stiop 

3 credits, 6 hours 

Concentrates on the producfion of creative 

digital photography; students are encouraged 

to experiment with new tools and techniques. 

Film and print scanners. CD-ROM discs, and 

digital cameras are used to produce images 

that are critiqued on the basis of both technical 

proficiency and aesthetic accomplishment. 

Portfolios are printed on digital output 

machines, silver-based photo materials, and 

four-color offset. Frequent readings, lectures. 

and site visits expand the ongoing studio 

experience. 

Prerequisite: PF 211 B. orPF217. or 

by portfolio review. 

PF 316 

Computer Animation II 

3 credits. 6 hours 

Advanced course in computer animation, 
which builds upon the student's personal 
exploration of the electronic multimedia envi- 
ronment established in PF 2 16. An integrafion 
of digital audio, video, and two- and three- 
dimensional software tools is emphasized. 
Prerequisite: PF 216. PF322. or MM 222, orper- 
mission of tlie department. 



PF320 

Narative Sound Production 

3 credits, 6 hours 

Students in this course explore creative sound 
design in finished films with instruction and 
practice in the use of sound recording equip- 
ment, sound transfers, building and editing 
mukiple synchronous sound tracks, and 
preparing for the sound mix. Students work in 
groups to create and complete a five-minute 
sync sound film that incorporates the concept 
of "sound design." 
Prerequisite: PF 210 B. 

PF 322 

Experiments in 
Advanced Digital Video 

3 credits, 6 hours 

An intermediate level course in digital audio 
and video production. In the context of screen- 
ings and readings drawn from the history of 
experimental media, students will learn to use 
various digital and optical strategies to 
approach a variety of thematic issues. The 
course is the venue for the production of short, 
aesthetically energized works for a variety of 
screening environments, and encourages col- 
labortafion with Dance and Muisc majors. 
Prerequisite: PF 2 10 B. 

PF323 

Selected Topics in Photography 

3 credits, 6 hours 

Study of one or more various media, methods, 
or problems in still photography to be offered 
according to the instructor's interests and stu- 
dents' requests. Topics include: portraiture, 
documentary photography, digital imaging, 
color manipulation, photographic illustration, 
and photo-based mixed media. 
Prerequisite: PF 211 A or by portfolio review. 

PF324 

Film Forum: Selected Topics 

3 credits, 6 hours 

Concentrated study of a particular area of 
film, video, or animation. Courses deal with 
specific issues and have included: film theory; 
seminars in sound; media, theater, and per- 
formance; history of video art; and history of 
animation. 

Prerequisite: PF210 B or PF212 B. or permission 
of the department. 



PF325 

Sound Design and Technology 

3 credits, 6 hours 

A hands-on exploration of various technical 
materials and procedures that complement the 
animator's production skills, including video 
editing and post-production technologies, 
analog and digital sound mixing and pro- 
cessing, film editing and track preparation, 
Oxberry Animation Stand use, and computer 
image processing. 
Prerequisite: PF 212 B. 

PF 326 

Advanced 3D Computer Animation 

3 credits, 6 hours 

An exploration of the aesthetic and technical 
possibilities of using two-dimensional com- 
positing and motion software and 
three-dimensional modeling and animation 
software as a means of creating character and 
graphic animation. 
Prerequisite: PF 316 or by permission 
of department. 

PF327 

Moving Art: Animation Theory 

and Production 

3 credits, 6 hours 

The aesthetics of animation and how the 
design and structural elements of frame-by- 
frame filmmaking differ from traditional 
cinema. Analytical, theoretical, production, 
and historical approaches will be brought to 
bear in the inquiry. 
Prerequisite: PF212 B or by permission 
of department. 

PF328 

Selected Topics in Animation 

3 credits, 6 hours 

Exploration of media used in animation. The 
content of each course offering will reflect the 
professional interests of the instructor. Topics 
include clay and puppet animation, 
character layout and design, and narrative sto- 
rytelling development. 
Prerequisite: PF212 B, or permission 
of the department. 

PF330 

Clay and Puppet Animation 

3 credits, 6 hours 

The technique of animating handmade three- 
dimensional characters. Topics include puppet 
construction (clay and mixed media), set 
design and construction, and lighting. The his- 
tory of puppet animation is also studied 
through film screenings and lectures, with a 
special emphasis on European filmmakers and 
nonverbal storytelling. 
Prerequisite: PF212A. 



188 



Ttie University of ttie An.s Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



PF331 

Image and Performance 

3 credits, 6 hours 

For artists and performers of all disciplines. 
An intensive cross-disciplinary workshop in 
which the students create their own short per- 
formance works using fusions of video, 
animation, dance, motion, and sound to 
explore the interactions between visual media 
and the performing arts. 
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing in any 
major department. 

PF332 

Video and Animation Technology 

3 credits, 6 hours 

This course will introduce students to princi- 
ples of animation and a variety of means of 
recording and manipulating media and the 
conceptual possibilities available through 
these means. The course will examine the 
technical and aesthetic principles of off-line 
video post-production, sound processing and 
mixing, and non-linear digital editing. 
Prerequisite: Multimedia majors or permission of 
the instructor 

PF 410 A/B 

Senior Cinema Production I, II 

3 credits, 6 hours 

Each student produces an independent 

thesis film. 

Prerequisite: PF 310 B for PF410 A. 

PF410AforPF4I0B. 

PF 411 A/B 

Senior Photography Wori«hop 

3 credits. 6 hours 

Students work on long-term individual proj- 
ects or shorter-term problems to develop 
technical, aesthetic, and conceptual mastery of 
the medium. The course culminates in a group 
thesis exhibition and production of an 
individual portfolio. 
Prerequisite: PF 31 1 B. orPF313 Bfor 
PF41IA.PF411AforPF41IB. 

PF 412 A/B 

Senior Animation Wori^shop 

3 credits, 6 hours 

Directed independent production of a short 
film project in an idiom of the student's 
choosing; additional production of a VHS 
video portfolio composed of several short ani- 
mated sequences that each student will be able 
to use when applying for work as either a free- 
lance animator or for employment with an 
animation company. 
Prerequisite: PF 312 Bfor PF412 A. 
PF412AforPF412B. 



PF 413 

Professional Practices 

3 credits. 3 hours 

Study of the practice of professional photog- 
raphy, with attention to various career 
opportunities, portfolio presentation, business 
practices, professional ethics, photographic 
law, and personal objectives. A variety of pro- 
fessional guests visit the course. 
Prerequisite: PF311 A orPF313A. 

PF415 A 

Critical Issues in Photography 

3 credits, 6 hours 

Concentrated study of the concepts of photo- 
graphic criticism. Extensive reading, writing, 
and discussion of contemporary photographic 
hterature, exhibitions, and trends is required. 
The course is an in-depth examination of the 
photographic medium from a historical and 
critical viewpoint. The course requires field 
trips to galleries and museums, and attendance 
at visiting lecturer events to place current 
trends in photography in a critical context. 
Prerequisite: PF311A or permission of the 
department. 

PF415 B 

Senior Photography Seminar 

3 credits, 6 hours 

Analysis and study of contemporary photo- 
graphic practices and trends. Extensive 
reading, writing, and discussion with attention 
to current showings and exhibitions is 
required. The course requires field trips to gal- 
leries and museums, and attendance at visiting 
lecturer events to place current trends in pho- 
tography in a larger historical and critical 
context, and to assist students in placing their 
own work within the canon of photographic 
expression. 

Prerequisite: PF415A or permission of the 
department. 

PF423 

Professional Practices 

in Film/Digital Video 

3 credits, 6 hours 

A series of mini seminars in various aspects of 
professional film and video production. Topics 
to be addressed include: studio operations, 
advanced lighting, advanced sound recording, 
sound mixing, and gaffer and grip responsibil- 
ities. Independent producers will be brought in 
to conduct workshops on topics of interest. 
This course supplements, but does not replace, 
Media Arts required courses. 
Prerequisite: PF 3 10 A orperniission of the 
department. 



PF424 

Time: A Multidisciplinary Seminar 

3 credits. 3 hours 

The concept of time considered from a multi- 
disciplinary perspective, drawing on readings 
in philosophy, literature, psychology, soci- 
ology, and film theory. Relevant works in film 
and video are screened. Students are respon- 
sible for a final term paper that interrelates 
two or more of the readings with one of the 
screened works. 
Prerequisite: PF310B or PF312 B. 

PF499 
Internship 

3 credits. 90 hours/semester 
Internship program in which the student is 
placed in one of several professional situa- 
tions. Placements in photography may include 
assisting in professional studios, practice in 
biomedical photography laboratories, and 
curatorial positions in galleries, among others. 
Placements in film and animation are spon- 
sored by local independent production houses 
and television stations, design firms, and free- 
lance animation artists: students of film may 
assist in location shooting, set production, 
editing, casting and scripting, and a myriad of 
other practical tasks. 

Prerequisite: PF 211 B (for Plwto internsliips) ; 
orPF 210 B (for FUmlVideo internships): 
orPF212 B (forAnimation internships). 
Open to Media Arts majors only. 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



189 



Printmaking/ 
Book Arts 



All Printmakiiig/Book Arts classes are 
open on a studio elective basis if the pre- 
requisites are met and space is available. 

PR 102 

Freshman Screenprinting 

1.5 credits, 3 hours 

An introduction and investigation of various 
stencil methods, based on three primary types 
of screen stencils-cut paper, blockout/resist, 
and photo emulsion, using water-based inks 
on both paper and fabric. Emphasis is placed 
on the acquisition of personal expression and 
technical skills, within the capabilities of 
screenprinted opaque and transparent colors, 
and the use of editions in collaborative class 
image exchange. Additionally, the various 
media unique to printmaking are shown and 
discussed, to introduce the beginning student 
to the wide possibilities of the expression 
inherent in printmaking. 

PR 103 
Freshman Etching 

1 .5 credits, 3 hours 

This printmaking course will introduce the 
hands-on processes used on metal plates to 
create images with line, tone, and texture. 
Color and monochromatic idea development 
is encouraged in this print medium that is a 
favorite of historic and contemporary artists. A 
class portfolio of prints will be exchanged by 
the participants. 

PR 201 

Relief/ Monotype 

3 credits, 6 hours 

Introduction to the graphic and expressive 
qualities of woodcut, linoleum, and collograph 
processes printed in monochrome and color 
Monoprinting ideas from direct drawing and 
painting on plexiglass and metal plate are 
also explored. , 

PR 202 
Screenprinting 

1.5 credits, 3 hours 

Introduction and investigation of stencil 
methods in screenprinting with water-based 
inks. Idea development and acquisition of 
visual skills in expression in color, line, and 
form through drawn, photographic, or com- 
puter-generated stencil processes. 



PR 204 
Screenprinting/Etching 

3 credits. 6 hours 

The graphic qualities of expression in screen- 
printing and etching/intaglio are presented 
through historic and contemporary examples 
and demonstration of the methods, which 
convey ideas in these two media. Various 
stencil processes from direct-drawn to photo- 
graphic and computer-generated are explored 
in screenprinting with water-based opaque and 
transparent inks. Handwork on the metal plate 
includes drawn drypoint. etching, and tonal 
processes. Emphasis is placed on the under- 
standing of the qualities of these methods and 
development of personal ideas through their 
combination. 

PR 211 
Etching/Monotype 

1.5 credits, 3 hours 

Individual expression with the graphic quali- 
ties of etched and directly drawn ideas created 
on the metal plate by hand or acid etching in 
color and monochrome. Processes also 
include printing from drawing and painting 
directly on plexiglass and metal plate with oil 
and water-based materials. 

PR 222 

Non-Silver Processes 

1.5 or 3 credits. 3 or 6 hours 
Students are introduced to the basic tech- 
niques of non-silver by building images in 
color with layers of brushed-on, light-sensitive 
emulsion. Light-resists can range from pho- 
togram objects to drawings and paintings to 
film or paper negatives. Processes covered are 
VanDyke brown, cyanotype, gum bichromate, 
and palladium printing. 

PR 223 
Bool<binding Methods 

1.5 credits, 3 hours 

A workshop class familiarizing the student 
with the characteristics and handling qualities 
of materials used in various book structures. 
Some of the structures covered include pam- 
phlet binding, multi-signature books, 
clamshell boxes, portfolios, accordion struc- 
tures, and oriental binding. Emphasis will be 
placed upon both the use of archivally sound 
materials and the use of these structures as 
vehicles for the students' creative expression. 



PR 224 

Bool< Arts: Structures 

1 .5 credits, 3 hours 

Historical book forms serve as models and as 
departure points for innovative new work. 
Students are made familiar with traditional 
binding techniques, encouraged to explore 
new applications, and to experiment by com- 
bining images and text into unique book 
structures. Some of the structures presented 
are signature binding. Japanese binding, 
accordion structure, pop-up structures, and 
tunnel books. 

May also serve as a follow-up course for 
students who have completed PR 223 
Bookbinding Methods. 

PR 300 
Lithography 

3 credits, 6 hours 

All of the basic techniques of drawing, image 
making, and printing that are necessary to pro- 
duce hand-pulled black-and-white lithographs 
from lithographic stones and plates will be 
experienced. An emphasis will be placed on 
visual expression and development of ideas 
through group discussions and critiques. 

PR 301 

Printmal<ing Workshop 

1.5 credits. 3 hours 

A continuation of the development of skills 
in all media such as relief, intaglio, and 
screenprinting by concentrating on one or a 
combination of them, including non-print- 
making methods. Investigation of the 
combination of media, including three-dimen- 
sional forms and unorthodox uses of materials 
and techniques, with an emphasis on 
integration. 
Pmequisites: PR 201 and PR 204. 

PR 306 

Print Study Seminar I 

1.5 credits, 3 hours, alternate weeks 
Students meet at the Philadelphia Museum of 
Art Print Study Room to discuss and study 
original prints and rare books from the 
museum collection. Masters of the 15th 
through the 18th centuries are introduced and 
researched. Printmaking processes that par- 
allel the material covered are demonstrated 
and practiced in the printmaking studios. 



190 



Tlie University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



PR 307 

Book Arts: Concept and Structure 

3 credits, 6 hours 

An opportunity to explore the integration of 
type and rehef image in unique and editioned 
book structures. Hands-on experience in 
dealing with composition (metal) type and 
computer typesetting is on an intermediate 
level. Methods of relief printing are explored 
and cultivated. Wood engraving, pho- 
topolymer relief, color reduction printing, and 
related traditional and contemporary methods 
of multiple image making are pursued. Special 
emphasis on development of a personal visual 
language. 

PR 308 

Advanced Lithography Workshop 

3 credits, 6 hours 

Opportunity for further investigation and 
development of lithographic image making, 
including photographic techniques and multi- 
color printing. Editioned prints of greater 
scope and complexity are undertaken, consis- 
tent with the student's interest and experience. 
Prerequisite: PR 300. 

PR 322 

Advanced Non-Silver Processes 

1.5 or 3 credits, 3 or 6 hours 
Continued development of image and skills in 
combinations of non-silver processes. 
Prerequisite: PR 222. 

PR 326 

Introduction to Offset Lithography 

1 .5 or 3 credits, 3 or 6 hours 
Develops skills in image preparation and 
printing techniques using offset lithography. 
An emphasis placed on personal imagery. 
Hand-drawn, photographic, and digital 
methods of image making are investigated. 

PR 327 

Advanced Offset Lithography 

1 .5 or 3 credits, 3 or 6 hours 

A continued investigation of offset Uthography. 

Prerequisite: PR 326. 



PR 333 

Attitudes and Strategies: 

Printmaking 

3 credits, 6 hours 

While the first semester of this course concen- 
trates on general issues of contemporary 
artists" practice, it continues in the second 
semester with a focus on the printmaker's 
world. The student creates many prints 
exploring a variety of printmaking methods. 
Drawings to clarify the direction that a pos- 
sible later series of prints might take are 
another expectation, as well as completed 
drawing projects. Students should take at least 
one area of printmaking and develop technical 
skills beyond elementary proficiency. All three 
mediums: relief, intaglio, and planographic 
are to be used in making prints this semester 
Combining methods, particulariy for the addi- 
tion of color, is urged. 

PR 400 

Advanced Workshop 

3 credits, 6 hours 

Development of ideas, images, and techniques 
while establishing direcfion and personal orig- 
inal expression. The workshop atmosphere 
permits a comfortable handling of all proce- 
dures and printmaking processes. Students are 
encouraged to be involved with adjacent 
expressive means such as drawing; painting, 
sculpture, photography, and crafts. 
Prerequisites: PR 201. PR 204. PR 300, 
and FA 333 A. 

PR 406 

Print Study Seminar II 

1.5 credits, 3 hours, alternate weeks 
The historical and conceptual context of 
prints, portfolios, and book arts of the 19th 
and 20th centuries is studied at the 
Philadelphia Museum of Art. Written and 
printed expression of the ideas and processes 
involved are integrated into this course of 
study. 

PR 412 

Digital Printmaking 

3 credits, 6 hours 

Working in screenprinting, etching, relief, or 
lithography, students will bring digital 
imagery into the printmaking process. 
Emphasis is on the intergration of idea, 
process, and the incorporation of computer- 
generated material. Investigation will continue 
into printmaking processes on an advanced 
hands-on level in terms of technical under- 
standing and the development of imagery. 
Prerequisite: Introductory class in one or more 
printmaking processes. 



PR 420 

Thesis Workshop 

3 credits, 6 hours 

Develops a body of work in preparation for 
portfolio and exhibition presentation. An 
emphasis is placed on the development of 
ideas and content of each student's work sup- 
ported by a series of individual and group 
critiques by faculty and visiting artists. The 
student is expected to participate in group 
exhibitions as well as a solo exhibition, and to 
present a professional portfolio of work. 
Prerequisites: PR 201, PR 204, PR 300, 
and FA 333 A. 

PR 421 

Collaborative Printmaking 

1 .5 or 3 credits, on tutorial basis, 3 or 6 hours 
Involvement in the business, technology, and 
experience of prindng limited editions for fac- 
ulty, student, or professional artists by guiding 
the artist in preparation of the idea, then 
proofing and printing the edition. Advanced 
students only; demonstration of mark-making 
and editioning abilifies. 

PR 425 

Book Production 

1 .5 or 3 credits, 3 or 6 hours 
The development and production of a printed 
book or portfolio of works: design and format- 
ting of a publicaUon including investigation of 
sequence, page design, and binding possibili- 
ties; and hands-on experience in the 
preparation of images for press production, 
pre-press techniques, and assisfing the Master 
Printer in the printing. All work is produced in 
the Borowsky Center for Publication Arts, the 
University's state-of-the-art offset lithography 
facility. Smdents may choose to collaborate on 
projects or work independently. 
Prerequisite: Recommendation from the partici- 
pant 's major department chair is required. 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



191 



M FA Book Arts/ 
Printmaking 

PR500 

Graduate Papermaking 

3 credits, 6 hours 

Graduate Papermaking is an advanced studio 
course based on the in-depth involvement with 
handmade paper as a creative artistic medium. 
Digital slide lectures and demonstrations on 
Western and Japanese pulp preparation, sheet 
formation, pressed and drying techniques will 
be presented. Students will create papers and 
images using a variety of handmade pulps and 
fibers. Book structures unique to the hand- 
made paper process and the creation of unique 
papers specifically for prints and books will 
be presented. Students will engage in indi- 
vidual projects utilizing this exciting medium 
to enhance their artistic development as well 
as broaden and enrich their educational goals. 

PR 600 A 

Colloquium: Text and Image 

1 .5 credits, 3 hours 

An understanding of language and verbal con- 
structs enables the individual to explore the 
relationship between text and imagery. 
Emphasis is placed on the individual's per- 
sonal vision throughout the program's course 
of study. 

PR 600 B 

Colloquium: History of the Book 

1.5 credits, 3 hours 

Hands-on study of rare books and manuscripts 
from antiquity to the present, with discussions 
dealing with their structural, historical, and 
artistic significance. The class meets at the 
Library Company of Philadelphia, with field 
trips to local special collecdons. 
Prerequisite: PR 600 A. 

PR 610 A/B 

Book Arts Studio: Color/Mark 

3 credits, 6 hours 

Provides the student with an opportunity to 
explore a broad range of image-making 
approaches. Emphasis on mark-making with a 
number of instruments and media, the use of 
color as a structural basis for composition, 
and the compositional and expressive use of 
letter forms. 



PR 612 A/B 
Book Arts Studio 

A 3-4.5 credits, 9 hours 
B 3 credits, 6 hours 

A series of studio courses exploring concep- 
tual concerns intrinsic to the creation of a 
book. The student learns to incorporate calli- 
graphic, handset, or computer-generated 
lettert'orms with images in unique and edi- 
tioned books. Emphasis on proficiency in 
process and the creation of a personal visual 
language. Focus on achieving a strong founda- 
tion in technical and conceptual skills. 
Frequent faculty and visiting artist critiques 
encourage an evolution in ideas and imagery. 

PR 611 

Non-Toxic Printmaking Methods 

3 credits, 6 hours 

A range of printmaking media using non-toxic 
processes and materials. Designed for grad- 
uate students who are experienced artists with 
an understanding of their personal imagery 
and approach to visual expression, but who 
are not necessarily proficient printmakers. 
Students will be offered a number of solutions 
to working in the studio, solvent- and acid- 
free. Topics covered will include intaglio 
(using water process photographic plates), 
drypoint, relief, collograph, monotype, and 
screenprinting. 

PR 623 A/B 
Bookbinding 

1 .5 credits, 3 hours 

Basic book structures are explored in the first 
semester with emphasis on sound conserva- 
tion techniques and good craftsmanship. In the 
second semester historic book structures 
serve as models and departure points for inno- 
vative bindings. 

PR 626 

Offset Lithography 

1.5-3 credits, 3-6 hours 
Oft'ers the student hands-on experience with 
offset lithography as an artist's medium. The 
primary focus is on the creation of personal 
imagery (photographic and/or hand-drawn) 
for prints and books. The course enables stu- 
dents to take advantage of state-of-the-art 
production methods and develop skills in pho- 
tomechanical processes, platemaking, and 
color printing. 



PR 700 A/B 

Colloquium: Professional Practices 

1.5 credits, 3 hours, alternate weeks 
Professional practices and issues related to the 
fields of printmaking, book, and publication 
arts are explored through discussions, lectures, 
and field trips in the first semester. In the 
second semester, the focus is on the comple- 
tion of the individual's written thesis 
requirements. Each thesis candidate prepares a 
resume', an artist's statement, and presents a 
slide lecture to be placed on record in the 
University Library. 
Prerequisite: PR 600 B. 

PR 710 A/B 

M FA Thesis Studio 

3-6 credits, 6- 12 hours 

A continuation of book and printmaking proj- 
ects is combined with related visual concerns 
in preparation for the required MFA Thesis 
Exhibition to be presented during the final 
semester. The MFA candidate develops an 
individual course of study and defines the 
projects in a written contract. A thesis com- 
mittee to advise the student through the thesis 
exhibition process is chosen during the fall 
semester. The evolution of ideas and imagery 
is encouraged through frequent faculty and 
visiting artist critiques. 
Prerequisite: PR 610 B. 

PR 711 A/B 

MFA Thesis Studio: 

Thesis Exhibition 

3 credits, 6 hours 

PR 723 A/B 
Bookbinding 

1 .5 credits, 3 hours 

Continued investigation of the book structure 
at an advanced technical level. Individual 
attention to developing creative solutions to 
support book content will start in the first 
semester. Through critiques and individual 
instruction, the final semester is devoted to 
developing structures that support thesis work. 
Prerequisite: PR 623 B. 



192 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



Painting/Drawing 



PTIOI 

Freshman Painting 

1.5 credits. 3 hours 

Primarily an introduction to the decisions, 
general methods, and problems of painting. 
Students are introduced to oil painting with 
both still life and figurative subject matter 
Technical instruction related to the broad 
image possibilities in painting. Students work 
from setups, models, and landscapes. 

PT 124 
Freshman Drawing 

1.5 credits, 3 hours 

Designed to increase the beginning student's 
awareness of drawing as an expressive picto- 
rial form. It is meant to enrich rather than 
duplicate the Foundation Drawing experience. 
Included in the course of study is an investiga- 
tive perceiving and representing of objects and 
scenes, mark-making as a conveyor of feel- 
ings, sensations, and ideas, and compositional 
and stylistic strategies that present meaning. 
The emphasis is always on the awareness of 
options for expression rather than on pre- 
scribed systems of drawing. 

PT 202 A/B 
Sophomore Painting 

3 credits, 6 hours 

Studio work introduces the student to the 
domain of painting through projects that cover 
not only the basic elements of form, color, and 
technique, but also the basic conceptual chal- 
lenges unique to painting. Students are 
exposed to the origins and purposes of 
painting and the range of possibilities offered 
by both traditional and contemporary 
approaches. 

PT 211 
Painting Studio 

1 .5 credits, 3 hours 

A general study of painting subjects, such as 
the still life, landscape, the city, and the 
human figure and its environs. This course 
often includes a subtitle, such as Figure in the 
Landscape, which defines the thematic basis 
for the studio projects, 

PT 213 

Anatomy and the Figure 

1.5 credits, 3 hours 

An opportunity to investigate the basic visual 
structure of the human figure, both skeletal 
and muscular. 



PT 219 
Watercolor 

1.5 credits. 3 hours . 

A course in which the preferred medium is 
transparent watercolor, the particular charac- 
teristics of which are explored. Both 
perceptual and non-perceptual approaches 
introduced. 

PT225 
Figure Drawing 

1 .5 or 3 credits. 3 or 6 hours 
Students work from the clothed and nude 
model and are introduced to the range of 
approaches relevant to the act of direct obser- 
vation. This course encourages the students to 
clarify what they are looking for when they 
are drawing the human body. Proportion, 
anatomy, psychology, posture, kinetics, 
weight, volume, tactility, and envu'onment are 
a few of the considerations that have an 
impact on the diverse ways in which figure 
drawings can be made. 

PT 226 
Abstract Drawing 

3 credits, 6 hours 

An assignment/cntique format, which exam- 
ines the nature of abstraction in the context of 
drawing disciplines. Opdons in media, tools, 
methods, and formats are considered in rela- 
tion to the purposes of a given project. In 
general, abstraction calls for an appreciation 
of the intrinsic properties of the materials used 
in a work, the formal characteristics of tool- 
markings, and the significance of pictorial 
structures. 

PT 227 
Figure Painting 

3 credits, 6 hours 

Painting projects that develop awareness of 
the many issues to be considered in creating 
forms that represent the human being. 
Working from live models as well as from 
other visual sources, including those of pho- 
tography and fine-art masterworks, students 
investigate the variety of conceptual and sty- 
listic possibilities in depicting the human 
figure. Concerns for gesture, weight, color, 
proportion, scale, apparel, portraiture, space 
and light, composition and narration, can all 
be a part of the circumstances in which the 
human figure is the center of interest. 

PT233 
Landscape Painting 

3 credits, 6 hours 

Painting the traditional subjects of the land- 
scape: land, city and country, water and sky, 
light and air. An examination of how these 
subjects can be seen and interpreted. 



PT236 

Figure Composition 

1 .5 or 3 credits, 3 or 6 hours 
A drawing course emphasizing the develop- 
ment of images using multiple figure 
arrangements. Assignments are designed to 
foster awareness of the significance of poses 
and groupings relative to formal design 
virtues, narrative, and symbolism. 

PT237 
Representational Painting 

3 credits, 6 hours 

A studio course addressing traditional and 
contemporary concepts and approaches to rep- 
resentational images. Special emphasis is 
placed on the relation between content and 
form. Exploration in color, space, texture, 
shape, composition, and style will be evalu- 
ated in the context of intention, aspects of 
recognition, and precedent. Paintings will be 
generated out of direct observation of nature 
and human models as well as from the stu- 
dents" own resources. Projects may focus on 
contemporary prototypes (paintings since 
1945), specific domains such as American 
Portraiture, or paradigms from the entire lin- 
eage of East/West traditions of 
representational art. 

PT 238 
Abstract Painting 

3 credits, 6 hours 

The genesis of abstraction can be nature, idea, 
or emofion. An abstract paindng is one in 
which the pictorial form is primarily a product 
of invention and imagination. It may or may 
not reflect a reality outside itself. Assignments 
investigate a range of concepts, sources, and 
procedures. 

PT264 

Mixed Media Drawing and Painting 

3 credits, 6 hours 

A diversity of drawing and painting media and 
methods, including collage and construction, 
are explored, discovered, invented, and inter- 
mixed in order to develop a versatile 
repertoire of studio skills. 

PT269 

Collage: The Constructed Image 

3 credits, 6 hours 

Studio projects are assigned that promote the 
development of images through the aggrega- 
fion of fragments. Collage as a principle of 
construction re-examines compositional 
notions of unity and harmony and can involve 
the interaction of diverse and incongruous 
materials, methods, styles, and/or images. 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 200S/2004 



193 



PT 302 A/B 
Junior Painting 

3 credits. 6 hours 

Students maintain designated spaces in the 
Junior Studio where they can develop a more 
professional working routine. They are 
expected to show increasing personal initiative 
and direction. Regular critiques on both an 
individual and group basis connect the student 
to the values of the past and the present, stim- 
ulate interest in the major questions of our 
time, and provide resources for progress. This 
course embraces plurality of ideas about 
painting and, linked with the goals of FA 333. 
advocates a spirit of experimentation and 
research. 

PT 334 
Junior Drawing 

3 credits. 6 hours 

An advanced studio in drawing extending 
knowledge, experience, and authority in 
drawing as a form-making act in the painting 
process and as a form of expression in its own 
right. Students will be guided through various 
aspects of the uses of pictorial elements (hne, 
tonality, surface, etc.) in the making of images 
that express content and meaning. References 
to contemporary and historical sources will be 
investigated. 

PT 340 
Color Studies 

1.5 credits, 3 hours 

Studio group projects and independent proj- 
ects consider the puiposes and effects of color 
organization, color perceptions, and color 
theory. Color is approached as emotive, sym- 
bolic, descriptive, and structural. 
Prerequisites: Junior status. 

PT360 
Junior Seminar 

1 .5 credits, 3 hours 

A discussion format aimed at investigating 
and understanding the content of, the motiva- 
tions for, and the influences on contemporary 
painting. Emphasis is on exploring the theo- 
ries, questions, and issues that create the 
intellectual context for contemporary artists. 
Students will be given reading assignments as 
preparation for the seminar dialogue. Selected 
texts will include artists' documents, critical 
writings, and classic essays covering such 
areas as aesthetic principles, political and cul- 
tural realities, and psychological perspectives. 
Class sessions will emphasize group discus- 
sions based on viewing slides and other 
appropriate visual material, reading assign- 
ments, and various written and oral forms of 
student presentations. 
Prerequisite: Junior status. 



PT 402 A 
Senior Painting 

4.5 credits, 9 hours 

Promotes the individual's development of 
identity as a painter. It simulates the studio- 
based condition that the painter is likely to 
maintain as a professional artist. The painter is 
the architect of the place where he or she will 
initiate short- or long-term projects as needed. 
Within this context, the senior painting major 
consolidates and develops issues that have 
emerged from coursework and study of prior 
and contemporary art. 

One-on-one weekly critiques from faculty, 
monthly senior group critique, and periodic 
critiques from visiting artists ensure the stu- 
dent's diverse responses to recently developed 
work. The senior painting faculty may assign 
specific projects if the student's initiative 
requires broadening or focus. 
Prerequisites: PT 302 B ami FA Hi B. 

PT 402 B 
Senior Painting 

6 credits. 1 2 hours 

Continuing the structure of PT 402 A. the 
painting major formulates a senior thesis 
project. Working with senior faculty who read 
and critique early drafts, the student develops 
a formal, written thesis and a body of artwork 
to be presented at the end of the term to a 
senior thesis panel. This panel is comprised of 
studio faculty, liberal arts faculty, and student 
peers. 

IN 449 

Crafts/Fine Arts Internship 

3 credits^ 90 hours/semester 

Conditions for enrollment: Must be enrolled 

as a junior or senior in a BS or BFA program; 

must have a 2.5 cumulative GPA; and cannot 

enroll for more than 18 credits, including 

those earned from the Internship during that 

semester. 

Open to Crafts and Fine Arts majors only. 



MFA in Painting 

Each summer session begins with a 
detailed review of the student 's previous 
work, assessing progress, addressing 
problems, and planning the summer's 
work. Ongoing individual meetings with 
the studio mentor are augmented by 
group critiques at the beginning, middle, 
and end of the summer session and by 
occasional group or individual critiques 
with visiting artists. Each summer's 
course concludes with planning for work 
to be continued on an independent study 
basis during the academic year. 
Independent studio work is assessed at 
weekend critiques held at periodic inter- 
vals and at the end of the fall and spring \ 
semesters. 

The following courses are open to students in 
the summer MFA program only. 

PT610 
IVlajor Studio I 

6 credits. 10 hours 

Evaluation of the student's artistic involve- 
ment, projecting and testing options for the 
direction of the student's graduate work. 
Open to SUMFA students only. ' 

PT611 
Major Studio II 

6 credits, 10 hours 

Further exploration of the options, with 

increased awareness of theoretical issues and 

personal vision. Greater focus in the student's 

work, with a view to completing the repertoire 

of skills and expression in the medium needed 

to undertake a thesis project. 

Prerequisite: PT6I0. 

Open to SUMFA sttidents only 

PT 710 

Major Studio III 

6 credits, 10 hours 

Planning and initiation of a sustained body of 
mature work to be presented in a thesis exhibi- 
tion during the following summer. 
Prerequisite: PT 61 1. 
Open to SUMFA sludents only 

See complete course listing 
under Master of Fine Arts. 



194 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



Sculpture 



All Sculpture classes are open on a studio 
elective basis if prerequisites are met and 
space is available. 

SC 101 

Freshman Sculpture 

1.5 credits, 3 hours 

An introduction to sculptural thinking and 
methods using a variety of materials and 
processes, including modeling and fabrication. 
Form-making options are undertaken that are 
especially suited to acquaint beginning stu- 
dents with the diversity of sculptural activity. 

SC 201, SC 202 
Sculpture I 

3 credits, 6 hours 

Emphasizes the fundamental and formal 
aspects of sculpture. Projects are assigned to 
help the student experience and understand the 
unique expressive values of mass, space, 
plane, line, and texture, along with such visual 
phenomena as balance, rhythm, scale, move- 
ment, and transformation. Introduces the 
student to a variety of materials and tech- 
niques. Assigned projects, group critiques, and 
slide lectures are standard parts of this course. 

SC 220 A/B 
Molding and Casting 

1.5 credits, 3 hours 

Covers processes and techniques utilizing 

plaster, rubber, plastics, clays, and wax for 

making hard and flexible molds and for 

casting sculpture in durable materials. 

Provides a thorough foundation in foundry 

practices, including wax preparation, 

investing, pouring bronze or aluminum, 

chasing, finishing, and patinating finished 

metal casts. 

May be repeated for credit. 

SC 241, SC 242 

Introduction to Sculpture Projects 

3 credits, 6 hours 

An open studio oriented toward helping the 
development of individual initiative. How 
ideas are transformed into sculptural state- 
ments through aesthetic reasoning and the 
internal logic of a sculpture's color, material, 
and physical construction. 



SC251 

Sculpture since 1945 

1.5 credits, 1.5 hours 

Lectures, discussions, projects concerning 
various artists, movements, concepts, philoso- 
phies, and critical theories influencing 
contemporary sculpture, focusing on the cur- 
rents since 1945. 

SC 260 A/B 
Structure of the Figure 

3 credits, 6 hours 

Anatomical and morphological analysis of 
male and female bodies for artists through a 
three-dimensional constructional method. 
Proportions, anatomic structure, surface 
topology, morphological variation, and the 
body in movement are covered. Directed 
toward two-dimensional artists as well as 
sculptors. The means by which the body's 
salient features can be recognized from any 
viewpoint in any pose is stressed. 

SC321 
Carving 

1 .5 credits, 3 hours 

Introduces the student to stone carving, one of 
the basic methods of forming sculpture. 
Students learn to prepare, maintain, and use 
the tools of the carver. They are introduced to 
the characteristics of suitable carving mate- 
rials. Emphasis on the exploration of the 
formal and expressive potential of carved 
stone. 
May be repeated for credit . 

SC333 

Attitudes and Strategies: Sculpture 

3 credits, 6 hours 

A studio criticism course designed to increase 
awareness of tlie attitudes and strategies 
embodied in artworks. Concepts such as ide- 
alism, naturalism, expressionism, modernism, 
and post modernism are explored in light of 
their implication for form-making methods 
and principles. Lectures, studio projects, and 
group critiques create a forum for an emphasis 
on sculpture. 

SC 401, SC 402 . ' 
Sculpture III 

3 credits, 6 hours 

Terms like site-specific, monumental, genre, 
narrative, emblematic, environmental, etc., 
reflect the cluster of types of sculptural 
imagery. This studio course is concerned with 
the ideational and technical issues raised by 
various types of sculptural imagery that are 
assigned in turn. The relationship that sculp- 
tures have with the context they exist in and 
the purpose they serve is stressed. 
Prerequisite: SC 202. 



SC 421 
Metals 

1.5 credits, 3 hours 

Forming metal has contributed much to the his- 
tory of sculpture, particularly in the present, 
where the idiom has become as familiar as 
carving and modeling. Concurrently offering 
both basic and advanced technical instruction 
in welding and forging, using both ferrous and 
non-ferrous metals, this course is concerned 
with both the technical and aesthetic aspects of 
metal sculpture. 
May be repeated for credit. 

SC 431, SC 432 
Advanced Figure Modeling 

3 credits, 6 hours 

Provides an atelier to continue figure mod- 
eling on increasingly advanced levels, and a 
context to help formulate a personal figurative 
sculptural idiom. Works are sculpted at var- 
ious scales and independent projects are 
undertaken in consultation with the faculty. 
Critiques involving the meaning and sculp- 
tural significance of the works are an integral 
part of the ongoing class activity. 
Prerequisites: FA 223 B or by permission. 
May be repeated for credit. 

SC433 

Projects in Figure Modeling 

3 credits. 6 hours 

Allows the student to move beyond modeling 

the figure as an academic study. Exploration 

using the figure in expressive contexts is 

emphasized. 

Prerequisites: SC 202 and FA 223. 

May be repeated for credit. 

SC 441, SC 442 
Advanced Projects 

3 credits, 6 hours 

Provides a studio context where maturing, 
self-initiated areas of concentradon in sculp- 
ture can be developed to fruition on an 
advanced level. Whatever the direction, a crit- 
ical emphasis is placed through both open and 
devised assignments on how materials and 
forms compatible to personal statements are 
found. 

Prerequisites: SC 241 and SC 242, or by permission. 
May be repeated for credit. 

IN 449 

Crafts/ Fine Arts Internship 

3 credits, 90 hours/semester 
Conditions for enrollment: Must be enrolled as 
a junior or senior in a BS or BFA program: must 
have a 2.5 cumulative GPA; and cannot enroll 
for more than 18 credits, including those earned 
from the Internship during that semester. 
Open to Crafts and Fine Arts majors only 



The University of the Ans Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



195 



MFA in Sculpture 

Each summer session begins with a 
detailed review of the student's previous 
work, assessing progress, addressing 
issues, and planning the summer's work. 
Ongoing individual meetings with the 
studio mentor are augmented by group 
critiques at the beginning, middle, and 
end of the summer session and by occa- 
sional group or individual critiques with 
visiting artists. Each summer's course 
concludes with planning for work to be 
continued on an independent study basis 
during the academic year Independent 
studio work is assessed at weekend cri- 
tiques held at periodic intervals and at 
the end of the fall and spring semesters. 

The following courses are open to students in 
the summer MFA program only, 

SC 610 
Major Studio I 

6 credits, 10 hours 

Evaluation of the student's artistic involve- 
ment, projecting and testing options for the 
direction of the student's graduate work. 
Open to SUMFA students only. 

SC611 
Major Studio II 

6 credits, 10 hours 

Further exploration of the options, with 

increased awareness of theoretical issues and 

personal vision. Greater focus in the student's 

work, with a view to completing the repertoire 

of skills and expression in the medium needed 

to undertake a thesis project. 

Prerequisite: SC 610. 

Open to SUMFA students only 

SC 710 

Major Studio III 

6 credits, 10 hours 

Planning and initiation of a sustained body of 
mature work to be presented in a thesis exhibi- 
tion during the following summer. 
Prerequisite: SC 61 1. 
Open to SUMFA students only 

See complete course listing under 
Master of Fine Arts. 



Theater Arts 



TH 100 A/B 

Acting for Non-Majors I, II 

1 credit, 1.5 hours 

Introduces the non-actor to improvisation, 
character development, and the basic idea of 
action and objective in performance. The first 
four weeks acclimate the new actor to being 
expressive in a group using body and voice 
through improvisation, theater games, and 
movement; breathing and relaxation tech- 
niques are also taught. The students are 
introduced to script analysis, and asked to 
write and develop monologues and create dra- 
matic characters for performance. Grading is 
based on class participation and progress with 
the work on monologues. 

TH 101 
Neutral Mask 

1 credit, 1 .5 hours 

A sequence of instruction in mask/movement 
techniques designed to remove all pedestrian 
movement from the actor, thereby developing 
the student actor's movement vocabulary. 
Develops students' awareness of their own 
personal movement habits, and their ability to 
drop their habits in order to achieve neutral 
body movement. Exercises are designed to 
achieve neutral body by beginning with 
simple actions, and progressing to object iden- 
tification. 
Prerequisite: TH 105 A. 

TH 103 A/B 
Acting Studio I, II 

3 credits, 6 hours 

Introductory studio focusing on the fundamen- 
tals of acting, basic skills for stage 
communication, voice and movement exer- 
cises, centering techniques, and exercises 
designed to increase physical and emotional 
stamina, identify and strengthen poor tech- 
nique, develop focus and concentradon, and 
introduce the student to the demands of the 
theater. In the process of demystifying the 
craft, the student discovers the energy, power, 
and vulnerability of .self 
Prerequisite: Permission of thefaeulty 

TH 103 L 
Crew 

Credits, hours by assignment 
Four different production assignments for 
School of Theater productions. Continues the 
classroom instruction providing an increased 
understanding of Technical Production. 
Open to Theater majors only. 



TH 105 A ^ 
Stage Combat I 

2 credits. 3 hours 

The integration of aggressive acting intent and I 

safe combat technique using both the unarmed ! 

body and the knife. 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. ! 

Corequisite: THI03A. ' 

TH 105 B ■ 

Stage Combat II j 

2 credits, 3 hours 

The integration of aggressive acting intent ; 
and safe combat technique using a saber or 

single rapier. ' 

Prerequisite: TH 105A or permission of the j 

instructor ' 

TH 109 A/B 

Voice and Speech for Actors I, II 

2 credits. 3 hours 

Linklater exercises are the basis of a course 
designed to help the student find his/her "nat- 
ural voice," and to integrate body, breathing, ' 
voice, thought, and feeling into expression 
through speech. The student is given a prac- 
fical understanding of the voice and how it i 
works. Tensions that inhibit primary impulses j 
are uncovered and dismantled. The function of , 
the articulators is studied and they are exam- j 
ined for blocks and exercised for release. i 
Prerequisite: Permission of thefaeulty ' 

TH 111 ; 
Makeup 

1 credit, 1 .5 hours ] 
Focuses on cosmetic application combined ] 
with thorough exploration of the relationship '. 
of appearance to character. The course empha- ' 
sizes the total visual impact of the character ' 
on the audience, discussing in depth the con- ', 
tribution of props and costume to the overall _' 
effect. The student is given clear directions on j 
the basic techniques, including methods and j 
materials for all types of stage makeup, period J 
makeup, fantasy, and the use of three-dimen- 
sional makeup and prosthetic makeup. i! 
Prerequisite: TH 103 L : 

TH 113 j 

Encounters With Theater Arts j 

3 credits, 3 hours j 
Designed to foster students' intellectual ^ 
engagement with drama and theatre, from '' 
classical to contemporary, by introducing j 
them to the basic terminology and method- -; 
ology used in understanding plays and ; 
performances. A range of critical perspectives 
are applied to a variety of plays from different , 
periods and places: additionally, a number of ; 
contexts for theatre study are introduced, i 
including theatre history and production 
elements. 



196 



The University of the Ans Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



TH 114 

Mask Characterization 

1 credit. 3 hours 

Introductory course in character development 
focuses on a process designed to release and 
open the student's emotional and physical 
range, stimulate the imagination, place great 
emphasis on physical actions, acting with the 
whole body, and ridding the student of self- 
conscious mannerisms. Through the use of 
oversized masks (and a series of challenging 
exercises), the student is allowed the freedom 
to become someone else. The work aims to 
integrate the student's skills with his/her 
instincts, allowing impulses and the imagina- 
tion to flow in conjunction with a flexible and 
vulnerable body. The work culminates with 
the presentation of a fully realized character, a 
synthesis of the entire semester's work. 
Prereqiiisile: TH 101. 

TH 115 A/B 

IVIovement for Actors I, II 

1 credit. 1.5 hours 

Introduces basic movement vocabulary in 
modem dance, primarily using basic improvi- 
sational technique. The course is designed to 
provide the student with awareness of his/her 
body and the basic skills of movement and 
dance, such as stretching, breathing, posture, 
coordination, balancing, etc. Allows the stu- 
dent the experience of creative application of 
movement and movement expression through 
various forms and structures of improvisation. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the faculty. 

TH 116 

Dance for Actors 

1 credit. 1 .5 hours 

A foundation course for actors that uses basic 
Vaganova ballet technique to develop align- 
ment, flexibility, coordination, and 
discipline, and introduces the actor to the 
movement vocabulary of this tradition. 
Development of body awareness with 
attention toward the verticality. two-dimen- 
sionality, control, and restraint of ballet. 



TH 122 A/B 

Music Skills for Musical Theater I, II 

2 credits. 3 hours class. 1 hour lab 
Skill training in sight reading, ear training, 
keyboard, and music theor)'. oriented to the 
needs of the musical theater performer. First 
year focuses on rudiments of notation, pitches, 
intervals, rhythms, and simple chords. 
Students learn to read from "lead sheet" 
notation. Examples are drawn from musical 
theater and classical repertoire. In-class exer- 
cises and drills are supplemented with 
computer-based instruction and keyboard lab. 
Corequisile: TH 122. 

TH 122 L 
Music Skills Lab 

credits. 1 hour 

Supports Music Skills I and II. 

TH 123, 124 

Scene & Lighting Tech 

Costume and Property Tech 

2 credits. 2 hours 

Introductory course in various phases of phys- 
ical production dealing with the stage, house, 
backstage personnel and their duties, con- 
struction and painting of scenery, stage 
lighting, costumes, props, and makeup. 

TH 123 L, TH 124 L 
Scene & Lighting Tech Lab 
Costume and Property Tech Lab 

1 credit. 3 hours 

Laboratory experience for smdents in SOTA's 
ATA. Students receive foundation training in 
scenery construction and rigging, lighting and 
electrical production, costume and property 
construction, and provide production support 
serving as primary assistants to professional 
designer working on SOTA shows. Weekly 
hours may vary depending upon assignment. 
Prerequisite: Open to Applied Theatre Arts students. 

TH 141 A/B 

Voice for Musical Theater I, II 

1 credit. 1 .5 hours 

Introduction to the fundamentals of vocal 
technique, vocal anatomy, and vocal perform- 
ance for the musical stage. Examination of 
various vocal styles used in the musical the- 
ater, past and present. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the faculty. 
Corequisite: TH 141 L. 



TH 142 A/B 

TH 242 A/B 

TH 342 A/B 

TH 442 A/B 

Voice Lesson for Musical Theater 

1 credit, 1 .5 hours 

Individual (and. occasionally, small group) 

instruction in vocal techniques appropriate for 

the musical theater, culminating in a jury 

examination each semester. 

Prerequisite: Permission of the faculty. 

TH 150 A/B 

Dance for Musical Theater I, II 

1 credit. 3 hours 

Dance technique training oriented to the spe- 
cific needs of the musical theater pertbrmer. 
Classes in jazz and ballet build strength and 
awareness and extend the student dancer's 
physical and expressive range. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the faculty. 

TH 203 A/B 
ActingStudiolll, IV 

3 credits, 6 hours 

Course continues the work started in TH 103. 
Sensory/emotional work and its relation to 
characterization is further explored, leading to 
an in-depth study of motivation and subtext. 
Sensory, emotional, and adaptation exercises, 
as well as improvisation and two-character 
scenes are used to deepen the actor's ability to 
execute honest and purposeful stage action 
and communication. Emphasis is placed on 
the "truth of the movement." Both pertbrm- 
ance and personal journals are maintained on 
a continuing basis, and outside rehearsals on 
scenes are expected. All scene work is 
directed by the instructor, using an individual- 
ized hands-on approach. 
Prerequisite: Placement by the faculty. 

TH 205 A 
Stage Combat III 

2 credits, 3 hours 

Intermediate course teaches the integration of 
aggressive acting intent and safe combat tech- 
nique using a broadsword and rapier 
and dagger. 
Prereqmsite:TH I05B. 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



197 



TH 205 B 
Stage Combat IV 

2 credits. 3 hours 

Intermediate course prepares the student for 

the National Stage Combat Proficiency Test 

adjudicated the last day of class by a Fight 

Master from the Society of American Fight 

Directors. This test includes unarmed combat, 

rapier-and-dagger, and broadsword integrated 

into a character-specific scene of dramatic 

conflict. 

Prerequisih':TH205A. 

TH 209 A/B 

Voice and Speech for Actors III, IV 

2 credits, 3 hours 

Practical training in speech for the stage. 
Emphasis on articulation and eliminating 
regionalisms. During the course of the year 
the student is expected to achieve a high 
degree of proficiency in General American 
pronunciation. Resonance, placement, and 
range are developed. Particular attention is 
paid to ending consonants, equafing length of 
thought and length of breath, and key 
wording. 
Prerequisite: TH 109 B. 

TH 213 
Script Analysis 

3 credits. 3 hours 

Introduces the student to practical analysis 
of texts/scripts. The course explores the con- 
cepts of conflict, human action, character, 
action/reaction cycle, dramatic structure, 
translations, and resources external to the 
script (historical perspective). At the course's 
end. the student should possess a firm under- 
standing of the process involved in script 
analysis, be thoroughly familiar with the 
composite types of dramatic literature, begin 
to understand the nature of an informed aes- 
thetic, and understand the consequences 
of each element of a performance on its 
audience. 

Prerequisite: THIlSorHUllO Bfor non- Theater 
majors. 
Discipline History IHuimnities 

TH 215 A/B 

Movement for Actors III, IV 

2 credits, 3 hours 

Utilizes intensive physical-emotional improvi- 
sation work, including exercises in 
Williamson technique, rhythmic movement, 
center floor work, stretches, and the use of 
physical impulse to expand emotional range. 
Prerequisite: Placement ijy the faculty. 



TH 222 A/B 
Music Skills III, IV 

3 credits. 3 hours class, I hour lab 
Continued skill training in sight reading, ear 
training, keyboard, and music theory, oriented 
to the needs of the musical theater performer. 
Examples are drawn from a wide range of 
musical repertoire. In-class exercises and 
drills are supplemented with computer- 
based instruction. 

Prerequisite: TH 122 B. 

TH 222 L 

Advanced Music Skills Lab 

credits, 1 hour 

Supports Music Skills III and IV. • i! 

Corequisite:TH 222. 

TH 223 

Acting Studio: Technique I 

4 credits, 7.5 hours 

Study in contact and truthful response, conver- 
sational reality, concentration, spontaneity, 
getting in touch with one's own behavior and 
that of others. 
Prerequisite: Placement hy the faculty. ■ " 

TH 224 

Acting Studio: Technique II 

4 credits, 7.5 hours 

Refinement of the actor's inner resources, and 
further development of the actor's technique 
and skills at textual analysis. Exploration of 
relationship, point of view, circumstance, 
truthful involvement, and the reality of doing. 
Prerequisite: Placement by the faculty. 

TH 227 

Fundamentals of Stage Management 

3 credits, 3 hours 

An examination of the role of the stage man- 
ager in theatrical production. Practice in the 
techniques of pre-production activity, coordi- 
"nating and maintaining rehearsal discipline, 
developing a prompt script, and calling a 
show. 
Prerequisite: TH 123. 

TH228 

Theater Management 

3 credits. 3 hours 

An introduction for the Applied Theater Arts 
student to the important role that theater man- 
agers and their administrative staffs play in the 
day-to-day operations of theater companies. 
An up-close look at all the facets of running a 
successful theater: fundraising and audience 
development, markefing and public relations, 
fiscal organization and board relations, box 
office and house management, and educa- 
tional outreach. 
Open to all students. 



TH 241 

Foundations of Singing-Acting 

2 credit, 3 hours 

Students are introduced to techniques for han- 
dling the unique challenges of acting while 
singing. Vocal technique and acfing technique 
are integrated through intensive work on solo 
literature, musical scenes, exercises, and 
improvisations. 
Prerequisites: TH 223. TH 122. and TH 14L 

TH 250 A/B 

Dance for Musical Theater III, IV 

2 credits. 4.5 hours 

Continuation of the previous year's dance 
training. Technique training in jazz. tap. ballet, 
social dancing, and related subjects is con- 
tinued, with focus on the technical needs of 
the musical theater performer. 
Prerequisite: TH 150 B. 
Required of all Musical Theater majors. 

TH 305 A/B 
Stage Combat V, VI 

2 credits, 3 hours 

Advanced exploration of the text-specific 
challenges of fight direction and fight per- 
formance using a wide variety of weapons. 
Weapons and texts change each semester. 
Prerequisite: National Stage Combat Proficiency 
Test Recognition. 

TH 309/310 

Voice and Speech for Actors V, VI 

2 credits. 3 hours 

Involves the study of the key dialects of North 
America, the Brifish Isles, and Europe using 
the International Phonetic Alphabet as a guide. 
The dialects chosen are those for which there 
is most demand in dramatic literature; conse- 
quently some time is spent on "Standard 
British," "Southern Irish," "American 
Southern," and "New York." Approximately 
eight to 10 dialects are addressed in depth. 
Prerequisite: TH 209 B. May be repeated for credit. 

TH 311 A/B 
Theater History I, II 

3 credits. 3 hours 

Two-semester survey of the history of theater: 
its dramatic literature, theater structures and 
production methods, styles of acting, and his- 
torical trends, through readings, discussions, 
and lectures. The course explores the history 
of theater through its artistic, spiritual, polit- 
ical, and cultural sources of empowerment. 
Students are provided with the historical back- 
ground to apply acting, directing, and 
designing techniques to the theater of other 
periods of history. 
Prerequisite: TH 213. 
Discipline History/Humanities 



198 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



TH 312 A/B 

Musical Theater History I, II 

3 credits. 3 hours 

Two-semester survey of the history of the 
American musical theater in the 19th and 20th 
centuries. Students develop insight into the 
writers, performers, and theater artists who 
created the legacy of the musical theater in 
America, and examine representative works 
from a variety of periods. Students undertake 
research projects focusing on major per- 
formers, writers, directors, and 
choreographers. Artists and their work are 
studied in print and on audio and video 
recordings. 

Coreqiilsitefor Musical Theater majors: TH 318 
Musical Theater Repertory. 
Discipline History/Humanities 

TH 315 A/B 

Movement for Actors V, VI 

2 credits. 3 hours 

Develops clarity and precision of movement 
through increased awareness of action and 
character. The student develops greater kines- 
thetic sense and enhances his/her capability 
for expressive movement. First term focuses 
on Laban efforts; second term on LeCoq tech- 
niques and period work. 
Prere(juisite:TH2l5B. . . 

TH 317 

Fundamentals of Directing 

3 credits, 3 hours 

An overview of the directorial process. 
Discusses the various facets of a director's 
job, especially in the early phases of a produc- 
tion, e.g. working with the actor, casting, table 
work, and rehearsal, and culminates with each 
student directing a scene of his/her own. The 
emphasis is on empowering the students as 
theatre practitioners within the rehearsal 
process by introducing them to the basic prob- 
lems encountered by the stage director, with 
whom all theatre participants work. 
Prerequisite: THSII B or TH3I2 B. 

TH 318 A/B 

Musical Theater Repertory 

2 credits, 5 hours 

Scenes, songs, and dances are drawn from the 
diverse musical theater repertory, enabling the 
student to develop versatility and a sense of 
style. 
■ Prerequisites: TH 222 B. TH 24 l.andTH 250 B. 



TH320 

Musical Theater Performance 

2 credits. 3 hours 

Elective course for non-major actors, singers, 
and dancers in which students can explore the 
craft of the singing actor through exercises, 
improvisations, and repertoire study. Students 
learn and rehearse solos, scenes, and ensem- 
bles from the musical theater repertoire. 
Emphasis is on developing honesty, ease, 
and expressiveness in musical theater 
performance. 
Prerequisile: Permission of the instructor 

TH 323 

ActingStudio: Technique III 

3 credits, 6 hours 

Studies in advanced acting. Further develop- 
ment of performance technique as it relates to 
the rehearsal process. Special emphasis given 
to clarity of behavior, characterization, action 
and objective. Scene work used as a means of 
gauging the actor's ability to apply studio 
work to text. 
Prerequisile: TH 224. 

TH324 

ActingStudio: Poetic Realism 

3 credits. 6 hours 

Exploration of scene study methods as they 
apply to dramatic works by such authors as 
Ibsen, Strindberg, Wilde, Chekhov, and Shaw, 
and further development of actor's attention to 
and application of behavioral specificity. 
Prerequisile: Permission of faculty 

TH 325 

Oral Interpretation 

2 credits, 3 hours 

Examines the elements of form and structure 
in various kinds of literature, and applies that 
analysis to the craft of the performance. 
Studies begin with fairy tales, investigate 
modem and contemporary retellings of fairy 
tales, and continue with modem and contem- 
porary short stories. The techniques of oral 
interpretation-different than those used in a 
studio acting class-focus on the meaning of 
literature via suggestive vocal dexterity and 
subtlety of revelation, rather than explicit 
action. Students are required to write papers 
analyzing the literature they choose to per- 
form. The course closes with a class 
performance. 
Prerequisite: Permission of faculty. 



TH326 

Audition Techniques 

2 credits, 2 hours 

Focuses on the skills necessary to audition 
successfully for theatre, film, and television. 
Topics include cold readings, monologues, tel- 
evision commercials, and dealing with agents 
and casting directors. 
Prerequisite: Placement by the faculty 

TH327 

Advanced Stage Management 

3 credits. 3 hours 

Advanced study of the stage manager's func- 
tion in theatrical production. Coordination of 
production personnel, and the management 
responsibilities in the pre-rehearsal, rehearsal, 
and production periods. 
Prerequisite: TH 227. 

TH 330 

Acting on Camera 

1 credit. 2 hours 

Designed for acting students who want to gain 
knowledge and experience in acting for film 
and television, the primary market in the 
entertainment industry. Sessions give each 
participant a hands-on experience in acting for 
the camera. The actors are able to see and 
evaluate each other's film work during a spe- 
cial screening session at the end of the course. 
Prercqiii.sile:TH 323. 

TH 341 A/B 

Voice for Musical Theater V, VI 

1 credit, 1 .5 hours 

Styles of singing-acting. Students apply inte- 
grated singing-acting technique to a diverse 
range of period styles of musical theater Solo 
literature from the 1 860s through the present 
day is examined. 
Prerequisites: TH 224. TH 222 B. andTH24L 

TH 349 

Production Practicum 

1 credit, hours by assignment 
Practical application of training to experiences 
in a wide range of producdon areas: 
dramaturgy, design, technology, theater man- 
agement, etc. May include realized studio, 
workshop, or project assignments. 
Prerequisite: Two semesters of TH 103 L. May be 
repeated for credit. 

TH 350 A/B 

Dance for Musical Theater V, VI 

1 credit. 3 hours 

Continued study of ballet and jazz technique 

and musical theater styles. 

Prerequisite: TH 250 B. 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



199 



TH 405 A/B 

Stage Combat VII, VIM 

2 credits, 3 hours 

Advanced exploration of the text-specific 
challenges of fight direction and fight per- 
formance using a wide variety of weapons. 
Weapons and texts change each semester. 
Pmequisite-.TH .U)5 B. 

TH 415 A/B 

Movement for Actors VII, VIM 

2 credits, 3 hours 

Confinuation of TH 315. Work in LeCoq 
movement. Spring term develops a senior 
movement project. 
Prerequisite: TH 315. 

TH417 
Directing Studio 

3 credits, 3 hours 

A thorough investigation of the direcdng 
vocabulary, exercises in space and composi- 
tion, exploration of scripts from the director's 
point of view, and practical experience with 
ground plans. The student is asked to demon- 
strate his/her understanding of blocking values 
and textual analysis by conceptualizing and 
then staging simple scenes. Introduces the 
basics of acting coaching and is coordinated 
with script analysis and dramatic criticism. 
Prerequisite: TH 317. 

TH 419 

Business of Theater 

1 credit, 1 .5 hours 

Exploration of the business and legal aspects 
of careers in the professional theatre: the roles 
of agents, managers, producers, and managing 
directors are explored. Involves lectures on 
various topics such as unions, contracts, taxes, 
management, and representation as well as 
occasional visits by" professionals in the field. 
Prerequisite: Placement hv the faculty. 

TH423 

Acting Studio: Verse Drama I 

4 credits, 7 hours 

Integrated voice and performance work on 
period scenes and monologues. Material to be 
covered includes Greek to Restoration. 
Prerequisite: TH323 or permission of faculty. 

TH424 

Acting Studio: Verse Drama II 

4 credits, 7 hours 

Continues the student's training in the most 
advanced level of period and style work. 
Increased attention to voice work is supported 
by the use of texts from Greeks to Restoration. 
Exploration of comic techniques, heightened 
behavior, and emotional support are involved. 
Prerequisite: TH423 or permission of faculty. 



TH430 

Stage to Video Production 

2 credits, 4 hours 

Project work both behind and in front of the 
camera. Each actor works on a monologue or 
scene chosen in consultation with the 
instructor to make his/her work in front of a 
camera compelling, secure, and believable. 
ATA students will deal with Production 
Assistant responsibilities, such as continuity, 
assisting directing, etc. Student assignments 
may vary according to strengths and interests. 
Special benefit: Students can use excerpts 
from the workshop for a "video audition" 
commonly required by today's casfing direc- 
tors, agents, and film/TV directors. 
Prerequisite:TH 330. 

TH 441 A/B 

Voice for Musical Theater: 

Cabaret/Audition 

1 credit, 2 hours 

A senior seminar in singing-acting. Students 
work on more demanding repertoire and on 
special perforining challenges such as cabaret 
theater and auditioning. A Senior Showcase is 
prepared and performed, and professional out- 
placement issues are addressed. 
Prerequisite:TH 341 B. 

TH 449 
Internship 

3- 1 2 credits, hours by assignment 
Hands-on involvement with a professional 
company. Placements may consist of adininis- 
trative or producdon support work, positions 
in assistance to directors, producers, stage 
managers or dramaturges, literary manage- 
ment, casting, understudying or performance, 
and inay be outside of the Philadelphia area. 
Prerequisite/corequisite: TH4I9. 
Open toTheaterArts majors only. ■ •' 

TH 450 A/B 

Dance for Musical Theater VII, VIII 

I credit, 3 hours 

Continued study of ballet and jazz technique 

and musical theater styles. 

Prerequisite:TH250B. 

TH 451, TH 452 
Senior Project 

3 credits, hours vary by assignment 
Faculty approved and supervised capstone 
experience in a student's area of concentra- 
tion. May be a School of Theater 
Arts-sponsored project or one with a reputable 
outside company recognized by the faculty 
and area professionals. 

Prerequisite: TH 349. 



TH475 

Special Studies in Theater 

3 credits, 3-6 hours 

Topics and studies of current interest in areas 
of theater practice, such as new trends or 
movements in performance, movement, voice 
work or international theater. Topics could 
also include areas of theater production, guest 
artists workshops, or contemporary develop- 
ments in the field. Courses can be taught in 
either a studio or lecture format with contact 
hours varying accordingly. May be repeated 
for credit for topics on' different subjects. 
Prerequisite: By permission of faculty 

TH 460 

Applied Theater Arts Seminar 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Analysis and study of contemporary pracfices 
and trends in non-performance disciplines of 
theatrical production. Students will engage in 
readings, discussions, and writing projects 
dealing with their experiences to-date in their 
chosen field of theatrical endeavor. The course 
may require field trips and/or attendance at 
special events to place current trends in larger 
social and practical contexts, and to help the 
student develop strength and perspective 
within his or her own work. 
Prerequisite: U4 Status in the ATA program. 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 200S/2004 



Writing for Film 
and Television 



WM 111, WM 112 
Traditions of Narrative I, II 

3 credits, 4 hours 

Two-semester studio writing course that uses 

narrative examples from various genres to 

introduce dramatic structural elements such as 

character, conflict, and premise. Smdents are 

required to write extensively both in and out 

of class. Two major creati\'e written works 

required in each semester. 

Prereqiiisiies: Permission of the instructor and 

re\ie\r of a portfolio of written work. 

VIM 113, 114 
Dramatic Structure I, II 

3 credits. 4 hours 

An intensive year-long writing course that 
introduces students to major principles of the 
three-act structure found in narrative screen- 
plays. Focus on such topics as act design, 
creation of character, conflict, and setting. 
Students will be required to complete major 
written work and participate in workshops of 
written material. 
Prerequisite: Permission of tlie instructor 

WM 214, 215 
Screenwriting I, II 

3 credits. 4 hours 

An intensive screenwriting workshop where. 

in the first semester, students write a series of 

outlines for a short screenplay. In the second 

semester, students vvrite outlines and a short 

screenplay. 

Prerequisite: WMIIS. tVM 1 14: or \IM2I9. or 

permission of the instructor. 

WM 219 
Writing for Film 

3 credits. 4 hours 

Studio writing class introducing students to 
the basic elements of screenwriting for film. 
Students are required to write dramatic exer- 
cises in class, as well as outside of class. 
Supplemental readings are discussed and film 
highlights shown to assist the students in their 
writing. 
Prerequisite: Hi HOB. ■ 



WM 225 
Interactive Writing I 

3 credits. 4 hours 

The first semester of a \ ear-long smdio course 
that builds upon the basic principles of dra- 
matic wrifing by idendfying and utilizing the 
web environment as a unique medium for nar- 
rarive storytelling. Through analysis and 
written exercises, students learn how multiple 
story and character arcs are designed and sup- 
ported by specific interactive storyielling 
models. 

Prerequisite: WM 2 1 9 for non-Hriting majors: 
MM 22 1 for writing majors. 

WM226 
Interactive Writing II 

3 credits. 4 hours 

The second semester of a year-long studio 
course that extends the interactive storytelling 
knowledge gained in Interactive Writing 1 to a 
project-based and dialogue dri\ en-narrative. 
Working in v\riting teams. sUidents create and 
write two short web drama scripts based on 
models studied in Interacdve Wrifing I. As a 
final project, each student completes a formal 
web drama proposal, outline, and script for a 
potential production in the culminafing 
course. Web Drama Studio. 
Prerequisite: IVM 225 

WM 241 

Arts of the Media 

3 credits. 3 hours 

Introducfion to the various production values, 
which directly influence the character of the 
dramafic product. Subjects of smd\ include 
music, cinematography, art and production 
design, editing, sound, costume design and 
special/computer effects as they relate to 
the writer's intenUon and the quality of the 
final product. 
Open to all students. 

WM243 
Screenplay Analysis 

3 credits. 3 hours 

A course devoted to the critical analysis of 
screenplays. Students will be required to read 
numerous scripts and write critical papers on 
various dramafic structural principles high- 
lighted. 

Prerequisite: WM219, or permission of the 
instructor 



WM 251, WM 252 
Narrative Cinema I, II 

3 credits. 6 hours 

Examines and analyzes film through the per- 
spective of narratixe structure. Various forms, 
schools of film, styles, and genres from both 
the domestic and international film commu- 
nity are studied chronologically, emphasizing 
the influence and integration of the various 
forms with one another. The course requires 
weekly screenings of the work being studied. 
Students who have successfull} completed 
HU 248 ATQ are not eligible to enroll for 
credit in this course. 
Open to all students. 
Discipline History/Humanities 

WM253 

History of Television 

3 credits. 3 hours 

Pro\'ides an o\er\ie\\ of the medium of televi- 
sion. The impact of tele\ision since its inception 
has become increasingly per\asive and has 
influenced an entire society through its ability to 
educate and entertain. Xldeo examples of the 
medium are supplemented by class discussion 
and reading assignments. Two term papers, a 
midterm, and final exam are required. 
Open to all students. 
Discipline History /Humanities 

WM315 

Adaptation from Fiction 

3 credits. 3 hours 

Writing course de\'eloping the craft of adapta- 
tion, focusing on the use of fictional material 
as the source for the dramatic form. The var- 
ious genres of fictional material, including 
novels and short stories, are examined and sm- 
dents learn to handle the conceptual and 
technical challenges inherent in the process of 
altering written text for the mediums of televi- 
sion and film. 

Prerequisite: Hi HOB. or permission of the 
instructor based on a revicK of a portfolio 
of Kritten work. 

WM316 

Adaptation from Non-Fiction 

3 credits. 3 hours 

Writing course developing the craft of 
adapting non-fictional sources to the dramatic 
and documentary form. Various genres of non- 
fictional material, including but not limited to 
newspapers, periodicals, autobiographies, 
biographies, memoirs, letters, diaries, and his- 
torical texts, are examined. Students learn to 
manage the conceptual and technical chal- 
lenges inherent in the adaptation of 
non-fiction for television and film. 
Prerequisites: HU HOB. and permission of the 
instructor based on review of a portfolio of written 
work.or\VMH2. 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



WM317 

Episodic Television Writing 

3 credits, 4 hours 

Studio writing class that analyzes the specific 
genre of episodic television writing. Students 
read scripts and view examples of various 
genres in the form, and work in teams to 
create original written work. 
Prerequisites: HU 1 10 B, atidJimior slaliis in the 
major, or permission of the instructor based on a 
review of a portfolio of written work. 

WIV1318 

Episodic Television Writing II 

3 credits, 4 hours 

Advanced studio writing course in which stu- 
dents outline and draft two full-length scripts 
for episodic television series. 
Prerequisite: WM 317. 

WM 321, WM 322 
Advanced Screenwriting I, II 

3 credits, 4 hours 

Studio writing course preparing the student 
for the entire process of crafting a full-length 
script for film. In the first semester, students 
develop a concept, pitch the project, prepare 
an outline/treatment for a full-length work, 
and draft the first act. The second semester is 
devoted to the completion of the full-length 
work and the revision process. 
Prerequisite: WM215. or permission 
of the instructor 

WM 323, WM 324 
Advanced Playwriting I, II 

3 credits, 4 hours 

Studio course preparing students to write a 
full-length play. The fu'st semester focuses on 
development of a theme and preparation of a 
draft of the first act. The second semester is 
devoted to the completion and refinement of 
the piece, resulting in a full-length work. 
Prerequisite: WM215, orpennission 
of the instructor 

WM330 

Web Drama Studio 

3 credits. 6 hours 

A capstone course in which students are 
required to begin with an already completed 
and approved web drama proposal and script. 
Each student then works to produce his/her 
own web drama script online, while collabora- 
tively supporting other writer/producers in the 
course on their projects. 
Prerequisite: WM226 or permission of instructor 



WM341 

Acting/Directing for Writers 

3 credits. 4 hours 

Studio course addressing the collaborative 
aspect of dramatic production involving 
writers, actors, and directors. Students are 
introduced to direcdng and acdng, using their 
own dramatic texts as the source material. 
Prerequisite: WM214 or WM2I9. 

WM 343 

Film Story Analysis 

3 credits, 3 hours 

Explores dramatic structures and storytelling 
conventions of narrative films. Screenings, 
group discussions, and analysis will highlight 
the devices employed by screenwriters to tell a 
good story. Weekly screenings followed by 
critical papers of each screening. 
Prerequisite: WM215, or WM219. 

WM 411, WM 412 
Senior Thesis I 

3 credns. 4 hours 
Senior Thesis II 

3 credits, 3 hours 

The final writing project in the program where 
over the year, the student develops an 
outline/treatment and the completion of a full- 
length screenplay along with two revisions. 
Entertainment industry practices are inte- 
grated into the course. 
Prerequisite: WM322. 

WM 431 
Interarts Project 

3 credits, 6 hours 

Provides an opportunity for writers and stu- 
dents throughout the University to collaborate 
on a semester-long project. Students jointly 
submit project proposals for approval and 
develop them to completion. Emphasis is 
placed on the students' ability to consider the 
artistic and technical implications of the com- 
bined media while successfully integrating art 
forms in a considered and polished final piece. 
Open to all students with permission 
of the instructor 

WM 499 
Internship 

3 credits, 6 hours 

Seniors are placed with companies to expose 
them to a real work environment in the field of 
media. Placements vary and may include local 
network-affiliated television stations, public 
broadcasting stations, or film production com- 
panies. A paper or journal chronicling the 
experience is required upon completion of the 
internship. 

Open to Seniors in Writing for Film and Television 
only. 



The University of ttie Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 





■ 




ueneral Information 


. 


■ ■ 


Undergraduate and Graduate 
Course Catalog 
2003 • 2004 



to 







The University 
OF THE Arts® 



Admission 



Barbara Elliott 

elliott@uarts.edu 

Director of Admission 

First Floor, Dorrance Hamilton Hall 

215-717-6030 

The admission requirements and procedures are designed to help 
the University select, from among the men and women applying, 
those best qualified to benefit from the educational opportunities at 
The University of the Arts. The University prefers applicants who 
express themselves through visual images, performance, and cre- 
ative writing; who demonstrate intellectual abilities through their 
academic record; who wish to increase their awareness of them- 
selves and their world; who address their environment in a posifive. 
individualistic manner; and who bring energy, concern, and humor 
to their inquiry. The University values diversity, liveliness, thought- 
fulness, and curiosity, and seeks in its students a broad range of 
intellectual, artistic, extracurricular, and personal energies. 
Admission is offered without regard to race, color, national or ethnic 
origin, religion, sex, sexual orientation, marital or parental status, 
age, or handicap. Each applicant is considered individually, and the 
Director of Admission may make an exception to any requirement. 

Admission to The University of the Arts is based on both aca- 
demic performance and artistic development. Each college at The 
University of the Arts has special admission criteria related to its 
course of study. The admission committee examines every appli- 
cant's academic record for evidence of rigorous, scholariy 
preparation. In addition, each college at the University has separate 
requirements for evaluating a candidate's artistic progress. Entrance 
to the College of Art and Design requires the candidate to present a 
• visual portfolio. The College of Performing Arts requires students to 
pass an audition in their specific discipline. The College of Media 
and Communication asks candidates to present a media or writing 
portfolio. Because the portfolio and audition requirements are spe- 
cific to each program, interested applicants should contact the 
Admission Office for a full explanation of the University's expecta- 
tions. 

Admission to the University is based upon a combination of fac- 
tors; candidates for admission must assume responsibility for all of 
the admission requirements when submitting an application and 
realize that the Admission Committee will base its decision on the 
sum total of these factors. 

Undergraduate Application Process 

International applicants should also refer to the section of this cat- 
alog titled International Students. (See index.) 

All applicants are encouraged to visit The University of the Arts 
for an information session and portfolio review or audition. 
Information sessions with the Admission staff offer students and 
their families the opportunity to learn more about the application 
process, programs of study, campus life, and financial aid. Portfolio 
reviews, interviews, and auditions are part of all applicants' entrance 
requirements and are separate from the information sessions. In 
addition to demonstrating their artistic abilities during the portfolio 
review or audition, students should be prepared to discuss their aca- 
demic record, personal achievements, extracurricular activities, and 
professional goals. 



1. Application Form. Paper forms are available from the Office 
of Admission or downloadable from the University website; they 
also may be electronically submitted at www.uarts.edu/applynow. 
All candidates are required to submit a completed application for 
admission and a $50 application fee. The application fee for interna- 
tional applicants who are not U.S. citizens or Permanent Residents is 
$75. The University of the Arts will waive the application fee in 
cases of extreme family financial need. A fee-waiver request is 
required from a high school guidance counselor, two-year college 
counselor, or other authorized person. 

2. Secondary Scliool Record. An official copy of the secondary 
school transcript is required of all applicants. A curriculum of col- , 
lege preparatory subjects is recommended. Specific course 
distribution is not required, although a minimum of four (4) years of 
English and two (2) years of history is strongly recommended. 
Remaining courses should be .selected from the approved college 
preparatory program, including study in languages, mathematics, 
science, humanities, art history, psychology, and sociology. These 
courses should be augmented by study in visual art, music, dance, 
drama, or creative writing. 

Applicants not holding a regular high school diploma may qualify 
for admissions consideration upon conversion of the General 
Education Development Test (GED) to a state diploma through the 
Department of Public Instruction of the applicant's resident state. 

The University of the Arts welcomes applications from students 
who are home-schooled. Home-schooled students must present a 
secondary school diploma issued by their public school district or 
the GED. For Pennsylvania residents. The University of the Arts 
also accepts secondary school diplomas issued by Erie Area 
Homeschoolers, Buxmont Christian Educational Institute, and 
Pennsylvania Homeschoolers Accreditation Agency, all of which are 
approved by the Pennsylvania Department of Education to award 
secondary school diplomas. 

3. Standardized Test Scores. The submission of official stan- 
dardized test scores is required for admission although applicants 
who have completed a college-level English Composition course 
with a grade of "C" or better, or applicants who have been out of 
school for more than five years, are not required to submit standard- 
ized test scores. The SAT, SAT 1 , or ACT are the acceptable 
standardized tests. Applicants with a diagnosed learning disability or 
the other qualifying impairment may submit nonstandard-adminis- 
tration test results. United States-educated students whose first 
language is other than English are required to submit the results of 
the SAT II English Language Proficiency Test (ELPT). The ELPT is 
offered as an achievement test through CEEB. Test results should be 
sent to the University directly from the testing agency. The 
University of the Arts' CEEB code is 2664. The ACT code is 3664. 
Candidates for admission from Puerto Rico or Latin America may 
substitute or augment the SAT or ACT with the Prueba de Aptitud 
Academica(PAA). 

i^. English Language Proficiency. Applicants educated outside 
the United States for whom English is not their first language are 
required to demonstrate proficiency in English. The TOEFL is 
required for applicants who have been educated in non-English- 
speaking countries. A minimum score of 500, if paper-based, or 173, 
if computer-based, is required for undergraduate admission. United 
States-educated students whose first language is other than English 
are required to submit the results of the SAT II English Language 
Proficiency Test (ELPT). The ELPT is offered as an achievement 
test through CEEB. Test results should be sent to the University 
directly from the testing agency. The University will also accept the 



204 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003^004 



results of the College Board's Advanced Placement course and exam 
in Internationa! English Language (APIEL) as proof of English lan- 
guage proficiency for undergraduate admission. A minimum score 
of 3 is required. 

5. Recommendations. Applicants are required to submit a letter 
of recommendation from a teacher, guidance counselor, or 
employer. Recommendarions should comment on the applicant's 
demonstrated abilities in the arts, maturity, ambition, determination, 
and seriousness of purpose. 

6. Personal Statement. All applicants are required to submit a 
150- to 300- word essay. The statement should be typed on a separate 
sheet of paper and attached to the application. The applicant should 
list his/her name. Social Security number, and the semester for 
which he/she seeks admission on the statement. 

7. Artistic Presentation. Refer to the Portfolio and Audition 
requirements published in the application packet. 

8. Interview. Although not required, all applicants are encour- 
aged to visit The University of the Arts and interview with a member 
of the Admission staff or University faculty. Applicants to the 
College of Art and Design are expected to present their portfolio 
during the inter\'iew. Applicants to the College of Performing Arts or 
the College of Media and Communication should be prepared to dis- 
cuss their academic record, personal achievements, extracurricular 
activities, and goals. The interview also provides the applicant with 
an opportunity to ask questions about the University. Applicants 
should feel free to note questions about the application process, pro- 
grams of study, courses, instructors, student life, or financial aid and 
bring these with them to the interview. 

9. Financial Aid, Federal Loans, Scholarships. The University 
encourages electronic aid application. Students may submit the Free 
Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) online at 
http://www.fafsa.ed.gov. For those without Internet access, the 
FAFSA can be obtained from a high school guidance counselor. 
Submit the FAFSA to the Federal Student Aid Program by March 1 
for priority consideration. List The University of the Arts as the 
institufion to receive your information. The Title IV Code for The 
University of the Arts is 003350. For additional infonnation. see the 
Financial Aid section of this catalog. 



Transfer Applicants 



Transfer students are admitted to The University of the Arts under 
policies that vary from college to college. The University considers 
any applicant who has been enrolled in a college-level program of 
study after secondary school to be a transfer applicant. Transfers 
enjoy a preferred position among applicants for admission since it 
can be assumed they have matured in their goals and have demon- 
strated their abilities at the college level. 

Transfer Application Requirements 

The application process for undergraduate transfer students is the 
same as for freshmen with the exception that, in addition to the 
process described in the above section, applicants must submit offi- 
cial transcripts from all colleges attended. Candidates should include 
a listing of any courses in which they are currentiy enrolled or intend 
to complete prior to matriculation at The University of the Arts. To 
aid in the assessment of transfer credits, a catalog containing the 
course descriptions, credit assignment, and credit-hour ratio for each 
college attended should be sent to the Office of Admission. A min- 
imum G.P.A. of 2.0 is required for transfer. 



Transfer of Credit 

Students may receive credit for courses taken at other regionally 
accredited institutions that are similar in content, purpose, and stan- 
dards to those offered at The University of the Arts. A minimum 
grade of "C" is required in order to present a course for transfer 
credit. Only credits are transferable, not grades. 

Candidates are given a preliminary transfer credit evaluation at 
the time of admission; final award of transfer credit and placement 
level is subject to receipt of final official transcripts and verification 
by the registrar at the time of enrollment. 

Residency Requirements 

The time it takes for a student to reach graduation will depend 
upon the time needed to fulfill The University of the Arts' degree 
requirements. 

Every transfer student must complete a minimum of four full-time 
semesters in residence preceding graduation and must earn a min- 
imum of 48 credits in studio and/or liberal arts courses. Transferable 
credits will be applied only to the specific studio and liberal arts 
requirements stipulated for a UArts degree. For this reason, transfer 
students may be required to remain in residence at the University for 
more than the minimum four semesters and to complete more than 
the minimum 48 credits, regardless of the number of credits earned 
at previously attended institutions. Transfer credit is evaluated by the 
department chair or school director and the Director of Liberal Arts 
in consultation with the Office of the Registrar. 

College of Art and Design 

Upon completion of the preliminary credit evaluation, the appli- 
cant will be invited to schedule an interview and portfolio review 
with a faculty member from the major department. If unable to 
attend a personal interview, refer to the University's Portfolio and 
Audition Brochure for specific requirements. 

Freshman Transfers 

Transfer students with fewer than 2 1 transferable liberal arts 
credits and without qualifications for advanced standing in studio 
should expect to be registered for the Foundation Program and antic- 
ipate being enrolled at The University of the Arts for the equivalent 
of eight semesters. Those who qualify for either the three-year pro- 
gram or advanced standing but wish to take advantage of the 
Foundation Program and elective courses may also apply as 
freshman transfers. 

Three-Year Transfers 

Applicants who have not had substantial studio instruction but 
who present a minimum of 21 transferable credits in liberal arts may 
qualify for the three-year transfer program. Under this program, stu- 
dents have the opportunity to fulfill the College of Art and Design's 
graduation requirements in three years. In the first year, the 
Foundation Program curriculum is combined with studies in the 
major department. If approved by both the Foundation Program and 
major-department chairpersons, the transfer .student may attain 
third-year status at the start of his or her second year. This program 
imposes an extremely demanding schedule and is best suited to 
mature students who have definitely decided upon a major. 

Advanced Standing 

Students transferring into the second- or third-year level studios 
of major departments are considered advanced-standing candidates. 



The University of the Arts LTndergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



205 



The first year in the College of Art and Design includes 21 credits of 
studio classwork in the Foundation core (Drawing, Two- 
Dimensional Design, Three-Dimensional Design, and an optional 
course. Time and Motion) and elective courses. Students who have 
completed between 18 and 21 credits in studio and who have studied 
in the Foundation areas may be considered for advanced status. 
Decisions concerning admission to a major department, class 
standing, and mandated prerequisites are made by major-department 
faculty upon an evaluation of the admission portfolio and prelimi- 
nary transfer-credit analysis. 

College of Performing Arts 

At the time of the entrance audition, the Audition Committee 
evaluates the applicant's performance with respect to the level of 
achievement required for advanced standing. Transfer credit in the 
major may be granted for comparable previous undergraduate credit 
earned, up to the level of placement. Transfer credits may be granted 
toward the Liberal Arts requirements regardless of a student's 
standing in the major. The number of Liberal Arts credits accepted 
for transfer is unlikely to change the length of time required to com- 
plete the degree. Transfers to the College of Performing Arts are not 
given credit for studio courses until after the completion of the first 
semester at The University of the Arts. Transfer students to the 
College of Performing Arts should assume that they will receive 
freshman status unless advanced status is clearly indicated in their 
letter of admission. 

College of Media and Communication 

Transfer applicants to Writing for Film and Television. 
Multimedia, and Communication are evaluated on a case-by-case 
basis, depending on the nature of prior educational experience and 
demonstrated creative abilities. Transferrable credits may be applied 
to major. Liberal Arts, and/or elective requirements. 

Application Notification 

Applications are reviewed on a rolling basis beginning in 
December for fall admission and September for spring admission. 
Priority is given to fall candidates who file an application for admis- 
sion by March 15, although the University will accept and review 
applications as long as space in the class is available. All applicants 
are notified of the Admission Committee's decision in writing by the 
Director of Admission. Generally, students can expect to receive 
notification of the decision within two weeks of completing all 
admission requirements. 



Tuition Deposits 



Applicants who are offered admission for fall enrollment are 
asked to submit a $300 tuition deposit within three weeks of the 
offer of admission to reserve a place in the entering class. Upon 
receipt of the tuition deposit a housing reservation will be sent to the 
student. The tuition deposit may be refunded if the student notifies 
the Office of Admission of his/her intent to cancel enrollment, in 
writing, prior to May 1. 

The University of the Arts subscribes to the May 1 Candidate's 
General Reply Date and will honor any applicant's written request to 
defer the acceptance of the offer of admission until May 1 . Requests 
for a refund of the tuition deposit that are postmarked after May 1 
cannot be granted. After May 1 the University assumes that the stu- 
dent's tuition deposit to The University of the Arts is the only 



enrollment deposit that the student has submitted. The University 
reserves the right to cancel the ofter of admission if the student posts 
a deposit at another college or university. 

Housing Deposits 

University housing is open to new students entering in both fall 
and spring semesters. Housing reservation forms are sent to all 
incoming students upon receipt of the tuition deposit. The 
University will guarantee housing to all students who submit a 
housing reservation and post a non-refundable $200 housing deposit 
by June 1. Although the University anticipates that it has adequate 
housing to meet the student demand for on-campus living, there is ■ 
no way to predict when University-supervised housing may be 
filled; therefore, after June 1 , space is available on a first-come, first- 
served basis. 

Deferred Admission 

Deferment of admission is not automatic. Undergraduate and 
graduate students who are admitted to The University of the Arts 
and then wish to defer their admission must submit their requests, in 
writing, to the Office of Admission. If permission is granted, a $300 
nonrefundable tuition deposit must be paid in order to confirm 
enrollment for the following semester or year. Deferred students 
who enroll in a degree program at another institution in the interim 
will not retain their defen'ed status; they must reapply to the 
University as transfer students. 

Deferred candidates are also required to submit a statement of 
_ activities and reaftlrm their intent to enroll at The University of 
the Arts. Candidates seeking fall or summer enrollment must file 
this statement by January 15; spring candidates must submit 
this statement by November 15. Students are permitted only 
one deferment. 

Those who are not approved for deferred admission may reapply 
for the following year. A new application form must be filed with a 
reapplication fee of $10; additional credentials may be required. 

Early Admission 

Extremely capable students may be ready for college before they 
have completed the normal four-year secondary school program. 
The University welcomes applications from those who feel they are 
scholastically and artistically prepared, and sufficiently mature, per- 
sonally and socially, to undertake college work. 

Early Admission candidates must be able to fulfill either of the 
following conditions: 

1 . By taking an overioad during the junior year of high school or 
summer courses, the applicant is able to complete high school 
diploma credit requirements and receive the diploma before 
enrolling at the University. 

2. Under a written agreement, the candidate's high school authori- 
ties grant the applicant a high school diploma upon completion of 
the freshman year at The University of the Arts. 

Conditional Admission 

The University of the Arts has designed alternative admission pro- 
grams to consider those whose potential may not be indicated in 
standardized test scores or class rank, or who have had limited 
formal training in the arts. 

Offers of admission may specify one or more of the following 
conditions; 



206 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



1. Pre-Freshman Enrichment Program. The admission of 
freshman applicants to the College of Art and Design or the 
Multimedia program may be contingent upon successful completion 
of the University's Summer Pre-Freshman Enrichment Program 
(PREP). This condition is made when the application review indi- 
cates that additional preparation in studio is necessary to ensure the 
student's success in the first year curriculum. PREP includes studies 
in drawing, two-dimensional, and three-dimensional design. Classes 
are scheduled for a four-week session, with 30 hours of instruction 
per week. PREP is a noncredit program, but grades are given to 
measure performance. A minimum "C" (2.0) grade-point average 
indicates successful completion. 

2. Academic Warning. Students admitted under Academic 
Warning must achieve a "C" (2.0) grade-point average at the end of 
their first year of study in order to be promoted. 

3. Academic Achievement Program. Applicants may be 
required to participate in the Academic Achievement Program 
(AAP). The purpose of the program is to provide developmental 
maintenance and transition services to students who. because of life 
circumstances, may not have achieved their potential in secondary 
school and need additional preparation in art and academics to 
ensure their success. AAP is funded by the Commonwealth of 
Pennsylvania's Higher Education Opportunity Act (ACT 101). 
Students selected to participate in the program must be Pennsylvania 
residents and meet the family income eligibility guidelines estab- 
lished by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. 

Advanced Placement 

CEEB Advanced Placement Program (AP) 

The University of the Arts may award three credits toward the 
Liberal Arts requirements for a score of 4 or better in any CEEB 
Advanced Placement Examination in an academic subject. An offi- 
cial report of scores must be submitted to The University of the Arts 
directly from The College Board. Advanced Placement Program, 
Princeton, NJ. AP credit is not given for studio art or performance. 
Students are notified of AP credits awarded prior to registration. 

College Level Examination Program (CLEP) 

The University of the Arts cooperates with the College 
Examination Board in its College Level Examination Program 
(CLEP). Credits may be awarded for Subject Examinations in com- 
position and literature, foreign language, history and social studies, 
or science and math depending on the score earned in the examina- 
tion and other factors as follows: 

1. The credit must be directly applicable to the student's 
degree requirements. 

2. The credits cannot be used to fulfill upper-level course 
requirements. 

3. The total number of credits awarded through CLEP is 
limited to 12. 

4. A score equivalent to the minimum acceptable score or 
higher as recommended by the American Council on Education 
is necessary. 

College- Level Coursework 

The University may also award credit for college work completed 
while the student was still in high school. Applicants who have taken 
college courses should arrange to have their college transcripts sent 
to the Office of Admission for transfer-credit evaluation. Students 



should also send official descriptions of the college courses so that 
the University can make accurate evaluations. Transfer credit cannot 
be granted for courses that were taken to fulfill high school gradua- 
don requirements nor for credits earned in a dual enrollment 
program that granted secondary school and college credit for the 
same course. Credit will not be granted for pre-college programs. 

International Baccalaureate 

The University of the Arts recognizes the International 
Baccalaureate Examination (IB). The University may award six 
credits toward the Liberal Arts requirements for a score of 4 or better 
in a higher level (HL) examination and three credits for a score of 4 
or better in a subsidiary level (SL) examination in an academic sub- 
ject. An official report of scores on the IB exams should be sent to 
the Office of Admission for evaluation. Students are notified of the 
credits awarded prior to registration. 

Credit from Nonaccredited Institutions 

Based on the applicant's portfolio, credit may be awarded at the 
time of admission by the department chairperson of the intended 
major. The maximum number of credits awarded may not exceed the 
number of credits earned at the nonaccredited institution (as 
adjusted to conform with the University's credit evaluation policies). 
These credits may be assigned to fulfill specific requirements of The 
University of the Arts degree as agreed upon by the department chair 
or director, and the registrar. 

Credit by Portfolio/Audition 

A maximum of 18 credits may be granted to applicants by port- 
folio review for artistic experience independent of any coursework. 
Credit by portfolio is granted only for studio work done prior to 
matriculation at The University of the Arts. Academic standing and 
course credit based on portfolio review are detennined by the appro- 
priate department chairperson during the admission process. This 
portfolio work cannot have been part of the assigned work for a sec- 
ondary or post-secondary course. 

Applicants who qualify may be granted credit by audition in per- 
formance subjects. Audition credit requires the approval of the 
Audition Committee and the school director. Academic standing and 
course credit based on the audition are determined during the admis- 
sion process. 

International Students 

Applicants who are neither U.S., citizens nor Permanent Residents 
are considered International Students. The University encourages 
international candidates with strong academic and artistic qualifica- 
tions to apply for admission. 

International students who apply to the University should follow 
the procedures outlined in the appropriate section of this catalog. 
International applicants should also be aware of the following addi- 
tional requirements and procedures: 

1. English proficiency. Applicants to the undergraduate pro- 
grams whose first language is other than English are required to 
demonstrate their proficiency in English in one of two ways: 

Submit official scores from the Test of English as a Foreign 
Language (TOEFL). A minimum score of 500 on the paper-based 
test, or 173 on the computer-based TOEFL, is required for admis- 
sion to the undergraduate programs. 

or 

Complete Level 112 in the English Language Program offered by 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



207 



any one of the more than 20 ELS Language Centers located 
throughout the USA. Information about these programs may be 
obtained directly from: 

ELS Language Centers 

1357 Second Street, Suite 100 

Santa Monica, CA 9040 1 - 1 1 02 US A 

Telephone: 310-458-7400 . , , 

Fax:310-458-7404 -• . ' 

www.els.com ■ ■ 

International candidates for admission to a graduate program 
whose first language is other than English must present an official 
TOEFL score of 550 or above, if paper-based, or 2 1 3, if computer- 
based, or complete Master's Level 1 12 in the English Language 
Program offered by any of the ELS Language Centers located 
throughout the U.S. Information about these programs may be 
obtained directly from ELS Language Centers, as listed above. 

2. Transcripts/Mark/Grade Sheets. All applicants must provide 
complete, oft'icial transcripts from every school attended on the high 
school/secondary level and postsecondary level. Each transcript 
must be translated into English by a certified translator and the 
translafion must be notarized. 

International students who wish to be considered for advanced 
standing and receive transfer credit for coursework already com- 
pleted should submit an Evaluation of Foreign Educational 
Credentials Comprehensive Report from the Academic Credentials 
Evaluation Institute (ACEI). International applicants to the graduate 
programs are also required to submit The Basic Report from ACEI. 
It is the applicant's responsibility to contract with ACEI directly for 
this service. Instructions and application for foreign credentials eval- 
uation can be obtained directly from: 

Academic Credentials Evaluation Institute, Inc. 

P.O. Box 6908 

Beverly Hills, CA 90212 USA 

Telephone: 310-559-0578 

Fax:310-204-2842 

www.aceil.com 

3. Certification of Finances. International students who plan to 
enroll at the University are responsible for all of their educational 
and personal expenses for the full duration of their education at The 
University of the Arts. Certification that these financial obligations 
can be met is required in order to qualify for the F- 1 visa. A 
Certification of Finances form is sent to international students upon 
receipt of their application. The form must be completed in English 
and certified by a bank official. This statement must declare the 
availability of funds of at least (U.S.) $3 1 ,340 to cover the cost of 
one year of education and personal expenses. The 1-20, used to 
apply for the F-1 visa, will not be issued without a valid 
Certification of Finances. All F- 1 students are responsible for 
obtaining immigration 

information and following all the regulations in order to maintain 
status. Page 2 of the 1-20 explains many of the obligations of an 
F-1 student. 

4. Financial Aid. International students may be considered for a 
limited number of University-funded, merit-based scholarships. 
These scholarships cover partial tuition costs only. Need-based 
financial aid is not available. Students who are not U.S. citizens or 



Permanent Residents may qualify for educational loans through an 
International Student Loan Program (ISLP). Further information on 
the ISLP may be obtained directly from: 

International Education Finance Corporation 
424 Adams Street 
Milton, MA 02 186 USA 
http://www.IEFC.com 

5. Scliolarships. A limited number of partial merit scholarships 
may be awarded to international students who demonstrate out- 
standing academic and artistic achievement and potential. 
International merit scholarship recipients are notified of the scholar- 
ship award within two weeks of the ofter of admission. 

Admission Requirements for Graduate 
and Post-Baccalaureate Programs 

The University of the Arts offers these graduate degrees: 

Master of Fine Arts 

Book Arts/Printmaking """ 

Ceramics 

Museum Exhibition Planning and Design ' 

Painting 

Sculpture 

Master of Arts 

Art Education 

Museum Communication 

Museum Education 

Master of Arts in Teaching 

Visual Arts 
Music Education 

Master of Industrial Design 

Master of Music 

Jazz Studies 

In addition to the graduate programs. The University of the Arts 
offers post-baccalaureate non-degree programs in Crafts and teacher 
certification in Visual Arts. Please refer to the Table of Contents to 
locate full program descriptions. 

Candidates for graduate admission are strongly encouraged to file 
the admission application and complete all admission requirements 
early. The University has established several deadlines, after which 
candidates' completed applications will be reviewed and notification 
of admission and financial aid decisions issued. If space remains 
available in the entering class after the published application dead- 
line, applications will continue to be accepted and reviewed on a 
rollino basis until the class is filled. 



208 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



Application Deadlines 

Fall and Summer Enrollment 

Application for fall admission and admission to the summer resi- 
dence MFA (Ceramics, Painting, and Sculpture) programs may be 
submitted as follows: 

Priority Decision 

Applications received and completed prior to February 1 for fall 
or summer enrollment will be reviewed for priority consideration. 
Applicants will be notified of the Admission Committee's decision 
on or before March 15. 

Rolling Admission 

Applications received after February 1 for fall and summer enroll- 
ment will be considered on a space-available basis and reviewed on 
a rolling basis. 

Spring Enrollment 

Music. Museum Communication, Museum Education, and Art 
Education accept applications for spring enrollment. 

Regular Decision 

Applications received and completed by November 15 will- be 
notified of the admission decision on or before December 1 . 

Rolling Admission 

Applications received and completed after November 15 will be 
considered on a space-available basis and reviewed on a rolling 
basis. Candidates can generally expect to be notified of a decision 
within two weeks of completing all application requirements. 

Transfer of Credit 

A maximum of six credits may be transferred and applied toward 
graduate degree requirements with the approvabof the program 
director and registrar. Only those graduate courses in which a grade 
of "B" or higher has been earned may be considered for transfer 
credit. 

Graduate Application Requirements 

All applicants for admission to graduate study at The University 
of the Arts must hold a bachelor's degree from a U.S. institution that 
is accredited by a recognized regional association, or have the equiv- 
alent of a bachelor's degree from a foreign institution of acceptable 
standards. 

1. Application Form: All candidates are required to submit a 
completed graduate application for admission and $50 application 
fee. The fee for international applicants who are not U.S. citizens or 
Permanent Residents is $75. The application fee will be waived for 
University of the Arts alumni. 

2. College Transcripts: An official transcript from each under- 
graduate and graduate school attended is required of all applicants. 

3. Recommendations: Applicants are required to submit three 
letters of recommendation. Two of these recommendations must 
come from professors or professionals in the area of the student's 
intended major who are familiar with the applicant's capabilities 
and credentials. 

4. Personal Statement: Ail applicants are required to submit a 
one- to two-page statement that describes their professional plans 



and goals. The statement should be typed on a separate sheet of 
paper and attached to the application. Applicants should list name, 
Social Security number, and the semester for which they seek 
admission on the statement. 

5. Interview: A personal interview with the director of the pro- 
gram to which the candidate is applying is strongly recommended. 
Appointments should be scheduled directly with the department. 

6. English Language Proficiency: Applicants for whom English 
is not their first language are required to demonstrate proficiency in 
English. The Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) is 
required for applicants who have been educated in non-English- 
speaking countries. A minimum score of 550 on the paper-based 
test, or 213 on the computer-based test, is required for graduate 
admission, or level 1 12 in the English Language Program, offered 
by any one of the more than 250 ELS Language Centers located 
throughout the USA, must be successfully completed. 

7. Financial Aid: Obtain the Free Application for Federal Student 
Aid (FAFSA) and a Stafford Loan Application if applying for finan- 
cial assistance. Submit the FAFSA to the Federal Student Aid 
Program by February 15 for priority consideration. The Title IV 
Code for The University of the Arts is 003350. 

Graduate students who wish to be considered for grant assistance 
should contact their department for additional information. 

8. Special Requirements for Graduate Education Applicants: 
Master of Arts in Teaching in Visual Arts (MAT) 

Candidates for this program must hold a BFA or BA degree in art, 
or equivalent, with 45 credits in studio art and 12 credits in art his- 
tory, with a "B" or better cumulative average. They must also have 
completed six credits in cellege-level math, three credits of English 
composition, and three credits in American or British literature. 
Master of Arts in Art Education (MA) 

Candidates for this program must hold a BFA or BA degree in art, 
or equivalent, with 45 credits in studio art and 12 credits in art his- 
tory, with a "B" or better cumulative average. A teaching certificate 
is not required. 

Deficiencies in this minimum must be made up as prerequisites or 
corequisites: a maximum of 12 such credits may be taken while a 
matriculated graduate student. With approval of the program 
director, a maximum of 6 studio credits may be applied to the elec- 
tive requirements in the program. 

Graduate Portfolio and Audition Information 

Every student applying to the College of Art and Design must 
submit a portfolio of his/her work. Every student applying to the 
College of Pertbrming Arts must audition. An application must be 
filed with the Admission Office before a portfolio review or audition 
is scheduled. Please refer to the Graduate Application Form for spe- 
cific requirements, which may be obtained through the Admission 
Office. 

Crafts Studio Post-Baccalaureate Certificate 

Admission to the Crafts Studio Program is based on portfolio and 
interview. The program is designed for students who already hold an 
undergraduate degree. Applications may be obtained from the Office 
of Admission. See Bachelor's Degree Holders in the Financial Aid 
section of the catalos for additional information. 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



209 



Post-Baccalaureate Teacher Program, 
Pre-Certification Concentration in Art Education 
Professional Semester 

The Post-Baccalaureate Teacher Program, Pre-Certification 
Concentration in Art Education, is only available to University of the 
Arts/College of Art and Design alumni. The Professional Semester 
is taken the semester after graduation and after all pre-certification 
requirements have been met. except for AE 552 The Art of Teaching 
and AE 659 Student Teaching Practicum. To be eligible to take the 
Post-Baccalaureate Professional Semester, candidates must have a 
"B" average and have successfully completed the Instructional I, 
PRAXIS tests. They must also meet with the chair of the Art 
Education Department and fill out a Student Teaching Application 
the semester prior to student teaching. 

Post-Baccalaureate Teacher Program 
(Non-Degree) 

Candidates for this program must hold a BFA or BA degree in art, 
or equivalent, with 45 credits in studio art and 12 credits in art his- 
tory, with a "B" or better cumulative average. They must also have 
completed six credits in college-level math, three credits of English 
composition, and three credits in American or British literature. In 
addition, candidates must have successfully completed the 
Instructional I, PRAXIS tests. 

Credits earned in the Post-Baccalaureate Teacher Program (Non- 
Degree) may not be converted to graduate credits or be considered 
for transfer credit in a graduate program. 

Applications may be obtained from The University of the Arts 
Office of Continuing Studies. 



Tuition and Expenses 



Mariann Cardonick 

mcardonick@uarts.edu 
Manager, Student Billing Office 
Second Floor, Dorrance Hamilton Hall 
215-717-6187 

Undergraduate Tuition and Fees 

Annual tuition is charged to all full-time undergraduate students, 
with one-half payable prior to the start of each semester. Full-time 
students carry a minimum of 12 credits per semester and may carry 
up to 18 credits without incurring additional charges. Excess credits 
are subject to additional charges at the standard semester credit rate. 
Permission of the dean of the appropriate college is required for a 
student to carry more than 1 8 credits in one semester. 

In addition to the annual tuition charge, all students registered for 
12 credits or more are required to pay an annual general student fee. 
The general student fee is applied toward the cost of library facili- 
ties, studio and computer operations, orientation, student activities, 
and special services, including health services, placement, and regis- 
tration. The annual general student fee is not refundable. 

Students registering for fewer than 12 credits are charged per 
credit. There may be additional course fees or charges, which may 
include deposits, the cost of expendable materials, and lab fees in 
selected studio classes. Lab fees, in particular, are most common in 
the Crafts and Media Arts departments. Please contact those depart- 
ments directly for more information. In addition, private lessons for 
students who are not enrolled in the School of Music will carry an 
additional fee. Reservation deposits for housing and tuition are cred- 
ited to the student's bill and are not refundable. 



Schedule of Annual Undergraduate 
Charges and Fees 



2003-2004 Academic Year 

Full-time tuition 
(12-18 credits/semester) 
Tuition per credit 
General Student Fee 



; 20,860 

$904 

$ 850 (all full-time students) 



Housing Fees 

Housing: 

Barleigh Residence 
Pine Residence 
Furness Residence 
1228 Spruce Residence 
311 Juniper Residence 
Housing reservation deposit 
Housing damage deposit 



$ 5,450 
$5,248-5,670 
$4,710-5,390 
$5,450-5,990 
$5,890-6,200 

$200 

$ 200 (refundable) 



Graduate Tuition and Fees 

Graduate students are considered full-time if enrolled in at least 
nine credits. Teacher Certification students in Visual Arts are consid- 
ered full-time at nine credits. Full-time graduate students pay annual 
tuition plus the general student fee. General student fee charges are 
the same for graduate and undergraduate students. Tuition for part- 
time graduate studies is charged on a per-credit basis. 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



A student who has completed all the course requirements for the 
master's degree and is currently working on the graduate 
project/thesis, either on or off-campus, must register and pay a grad- 
uate project continuation fee (equal to the cost of 0.5 
credit/semester) until all degree requirments are met. Students com- 
pleting a degree in the summer must pay the fee in the final 
semester. This registration, through the Office of the Registrar, is 
required in each semester until all degree requirements are met. 

A student without an approved leave of absence who does not reg- 
ister each semester will be considered to have withdrawn from 
candidacy for the degree. Students who have not maintained contin- 
uous registration must apply through the Office of the Registrar for 
readmission to the program, and will be retroacrively charged for the 
intervening semesters. 

Schedule of Annual Graduate 
Charges and Fees 
2003-2004 Academic Year 

Full-time tuition $20,860 (9-18 credits/semester) 

Tuifion per credit $ 1,059 

General Student Fee $ 850 (all full-time students) 

Tuition Payments and Financial 
Responsibility 

Payment in full for each semester is required before students may 
attend classes. Tuition invoices are mailed to students each July and 
November. Students who have not made arrangements to pay their 
tuition, fees, housing, and/or any other financial obligations to the 
University before the first day of classes each semester are subject to 
having their registration cancelled for that semester and losing their 
class places. Cancelled registrations can only be reinstated with the 
approval of the Student Billing Office and are subject to a late pay- 
ment fee of $60. 

The first-semester bill must be paid by mid-August and the 
second-semester bill must be paid by mid-December. Any amount 
unpaid after the due date as indicated on the invoice is subject to a 
late payment fee of S60 unless an alternative payment plan has been 
arranged through TMS (see "Payment Plans'"). Settlement of all 
financial obligations of the University rests with the student or the 
student's parents if the student has not attained independent adult 
status. 

Failure to receive a tuition statement does not excuse a student 
from paying tuition and fees before attending classes each semester. 
Student accounts are considered settled when students receive 
Business Office Approval and a validated ID card. 

Any unpaid balance at the end of the semester will be referred to 
the University's outside collection agency for collection and legal 
action. Students or their paying agents will be responsible for all 
collection costs and attorney fees. 

Methods of Payment 

Students who wish to make their tuition payment directly to the 
University may use one of the following methods of payment: 

1. Check 

2. Certified check 

3. Money order 

4. Wire Transfer (Before arranging for a wire tiansfer. please call 
the University for details about the process: 215-717-6194.) 



Payment Plans 

As a service to our students and their parents, the University 
offers a commercially-sponsored tuition payment plan. The plan 
allows for the total sum of all tuition and fees to be paid over 10 
months, from May through February. 

Tuition Management Systems. Inc. (TMS), offers a budget plan 
that allows you to pay all or part of your annual charges in 10 
monthly installments for a nominal annual administrative fee. A sep- 
arate insurance program is also available to participants with this 
plan. For more information contact TMS at 1-800-722-4867. 

Acceptance of Credit Cards 

The University only accepts credit cards for payment of new stu- 
dent application fees. Continuing Education programs, and 
purchases made at the bookstore. Due to the high cost of merchant 
service fees imposed by credit card companies and banks, the 
University does not accept credit cards for payment of undergrad- 
uate and graduate tuition, housing charges, and the general fee. For 
those who prefer to use credit cards for their convenience or for 
reward/bonus programs. Tuition Management Systems. Inc. 
(TMS — see Payment Plans, above) provides two options. You may 
use your credit card either to make your monthly payments to TMS 
or to pay the tuition in full. TMS will not assess a separate enroll- 
ment fee for these options. However, their contract levies a 
convenience fee. between two to three percent of the balance 
charged. For more detailed information, please call TMS at 1-800- 
722-4867. 

Tuition Remission and Discounts 

Students are entitled to only one type of tuition discount (i.e., 
alumni discount, sibling discount, spousal di.scount. etc.) in any 
given academic year. For more information, contact the Office of the 
Registrar at 215-717-6420. 

Alumni Discount 

Sons and daughters of alumni of the University of the Arts are eli- 
gible for a 10 percent remission on their tuition. To qualify, a student 
must present to the Registrar an original or notarized copy of the 
long-form birth certificate, which lists the names of both parents. 

For purposes of this policy, alumni are defined as graduates who 
have received a diploma, degree, or certificate as a matriculated 
student in an undergraduate or graduate program from either 
the College of Art and Design, the College of Media and 
Communication or the College of Performing Arts, excluding the 
Evening or Continuing Education divisions of each College. The 
discount will be issued commensurate with the number of years that 
a student's alumni parents attended the University (i.e., if an 
alumnus received a certificate from a two-year program, the dis- 
count would be off'ered for only two years). 

Sibling Discount 

Families that have two or more members simultaneously 
attending The University of the Arts are eligible for a tuition remis- 
sion. To qualify, a student must present to the Registrar an original 
or notarized copy of the long-form birth certificate, which lists the 
names of both parents. The youngest member of the family may 
receive a 10 percent tuition remission each semester during which 
both are full-time matriculating students. 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



Spousal Discount 

A husband and wife attending The University of the Arts are eh'- 
gible for tuition remission. To qualify, presentation of an original or 
notarized copy of the certificate of marriage must be submitted to 
the Registrar. The second person of the married couple to register at 
the University may receive a 10 percent tuition remission each 
semester during which they are both full-time matriculated students. 

Housing Fees 

Students are not permitted to move into University housing until 
all tuition and fees are paid in full. A damage deposit is required of 
all students who live in University housing. This deposit is held in 
escrow and will be refunded to the student after the apartment is 
vacated. Any charges for damage to the apartment will be subtracted 
from this deposit. An additional Housing Reservation Deposit is 
required to reserve a space in University housing. This deposit will 
be credited to the student's bill and is not refundable. 

Special Charges and Fees 

Application Fee 

An application fee of $50 is required with every application for 
admission or readmission. 

Tuition Deposit 

Once the student has been accepted for admission to the 
University, a $300 tuition deposit is required to reserve a place in the 
class. This deposit will be credited to the student's bill and is not 
refundable after May 1 . The tuition deposit must be paid in U.S. dol- 
lars within three weeks of the offer of admission. Please refer to the 
Admissions section of this catalog for more complete information. 

Late Registration 

A late registration fee of $35 will be charged to any student regis- 
tering after the dates listed in the Academic Calendar. 

Late Payment 

A late payment fee of $60 will be charged to any student failing to 
pay his or her tuition and/or housing bill by the due date. 

Bad Checi< Penalty 

A $25 fine is charged for all checks issued to the University and 
not p.aid upon presentafion to the bank. A hold will be placed on all 
official student docuinents until the original charge is paid in addi- 
tion to the fine. A "flag" will be placed on the student's account and, 
for a period of one year, payment with a personal check will not be 
permitted. At the end of one year the student may appeal to the 
Billing Manager to review his/her payment history. All balances will 
be referred to a collection agency if repayment is not made. 

Transcript Fee 

A $5 fee is charged to students requesting an official transcript 
from the University. Please refer to the Academic Policies section in 
the front of this catalog under Transcript Request Procedures for 
more information. 



Tuition Refund Policy and Procedures 

By registering for classes, students accept responsibility for 
paying charges for the entire semester/term, regardless of the 
method of payment and attendance in class. 

Students who are considering withdrawing (either from the 
University or individual classes) should seriously consider the finan- 
cial consequences. Depending on the time of withdrawal, balances 
may still be owed to the University, the Federal Government (if a 
Title IV program aid recipient), State Governments, Agencies, loan 
providers, and other non-University grantors of scholarships and 
awards. Students are urged to meet with a financial aid counselor to 
discuss the monetary impact of withdrawal and their eligibility for 
aid in the current and future semesters. 



General Refund Policy 




Fall or Spring Semester 




Tuition Charged 


Tuition Refunded 


Withdrawal occurring: 




Prior to first day of classes 0% 


100% 


Before end of second week 20% 


80% 


Before end of third week 60% 


40% 


After end of third week 100% 


0% 



0% 


100% 


20% 


80% 


60% 


40% 


00% 


0% 



Summer Sessions 

Withdrawal occurring: 
Prior to first day of classes 
Before end of first week 
Before end of second week 
After end of second week 



The following items will be excluded from the refund calculation: 

1. The comprehensive fee. 

2. Supplies, which are considered 100 percent expended upon 
purchase. 

3. Books, which are considered 50 percent expended during the 
first week of classes and 100 percent thereafter. 

4. The documented cost of any equipment issued to the student 
and not returned in good condition. 

5. Library fines and late fees. 

6. Security deposits, which will be returned separately once it has 
been determined that no damages or fines have been assessed. 

Retention of Federal Title IV Program Funds 

Students should understand that withdrawing from the University 
may cause them to owe more money than if they had remained to 
complete the semester/term. 

Withdrawing students who have been awarded Title IV Program 
aid funds are permitted to retain a pro-rata portion of these funds as 
an offset (payment) against tuition charges prior to completion of 60 
percent of any Term or Summer Session. After the 60 percent mark, 
all such aid is treated as 100 percent earned. Title IV Program or 
Federal funds would include PELL and SEOG grants, and Perkins, 
Stafford, and PLUS loans. 

For example, a student withdrawing during a fall or spring terni 
on the 20th calendar day after the start of classes retains 19 percent 
of the total Title IV aid awarded (excluding Federal Work Study). 
This percentage is calculated by dividing the 20 days completed by 
the 105 total days in the term (including Saturdays, Sundays, and 
holidays). This retained aid is then applied against the remaining 
balance of tuition charges calculated under the general refund 



The University of the Ails Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



policy. The balance of the Title IV aid-or 81 percent-must be 
returned to the appropriate issuer. If this student also received 
University awards (non-Title IV Program), the same retention per- 
centage would apply. 

If a student withdrew after 60 percent of the term was completed, 
or on the 63rd day. 100 percent of the aid would be retained. 

A student withdrawing during a Summer Session on the 20th cal- 
endar day after the start of classes retains 47.6 percent of the total 
Title IV aid awarded. This percentage is calculated by dividing the 
20 days completed by the 42 total days in the session (including 
Saturdays, Sundays, and holidays). This retained aid is then applied 
against the remaining balance of tuition charges calculated under the 
general refund policy. If this student also received University awards 
(non-Title IV program), the same retention percentage would apply. 

If a student withdrew after 60 percent of the term was completed, 
or on the 25th day, 100 percent of the aid would be retained. 

That portion of Federal Title IV aid that will be returned to the 
issuer must be repaid in the following order: 

1 . Unsubsidized Federal Stafford Loan 

2. Subsidized Federal Stafford Loan 

3. Federal PLUS Loan 

4. Federal Perkins Loan 

5. Federal Pell Grant . . 

6. Federal SEOG Aid 

7. Any other Title IV program aid 

8. Other federal, state, or private student financial assistance 
' 9. To the student 

Retention of University Scholarships, 
Grants, and Awards 

Withdrawing students who have received University Scholarships. 
Grants, and Awards are permitted to retain a portion of these funds 
as an offset (payment) against tuition charges based on the duration 
of attendance. For those students not receiving any Title IV program 
aid, the portion retained is the same as the tuition charged under the 
general refund policy. For example, a student without any Title IV 
aid withdrawing before the end of the third week of classes will be 
liable for 60 percent of tuition charges. This same student will also 
receive credit for 60 percent of any University aid awarded. 

If a withdrawing student received Title IV Program aid in 
addition to University Scholarships and Awards, the total amount 
of aid retained from both sources is calculated using the Federal 
Title IV rules. 

Financial Holds 

Students who do not satisfy their financial obligations to the 
University will have a financial hold placed on their record. Such a 
hold may result in cancellation of the student's preregistration and 
will prevent the student from being permitted to register for future 
courses unfil the financial hold is lifted. Furthermore, students with 
outstanding financial obligations to the University will not be eli- 
gible to receive official copies of their transcripts or their diplomas. 
To avoid incurring late fees and/or a hold on academic records, stu- 
dents are expected to make arrangements to pay all tuition, fees, 
library fines and fees, and dormitory charges by the due date on their 
bill. Students are encouraged to apply early for financial aid. 



Financial Aid 



AquilaW. Galgon 

finaid@uarts.edu 

Director of Financial Aid 

Second Floor, Dorrance Hamilton Hall 

215-717-6170 

The University of the Arts offers a variety of financial aid pro- 
grams to assist students in meeting their educational goals. Aid may 
be offered in the form of grants, scholarships, loans, or employment, 
and is funded through federal, state, institutional, or private organi- 
zations. Grants and scholarships are considered gift aid and need not 
be repaid. Loans, which must be repaid, are usually offered at a low 
interest rate and have an extended repayment period. 

Financial need is defined as the difference between the cost of 
education and the family's federally calculated contribution to these 
costs, the Expected Family Contribution (HFC). Where need exists, 
the University assists in meeting costs within the resources available 
to the institution. 

Eligibility for aid is based upon the applicant's financial need, the 
ability to meet individual program requirements, and the availability 
of funding. 

Typically. 75 percent of the University's students enrolled on a 
full-time basis are eligible for some type of need-based aid. 
Therefore all students, undergraduate and graduate, are encouraged 
to apply. 

Information on application procedures, types of aid, program 
requirements, educational costs as determined by the University, and 
the students' rights and responsibilities is detailed in the following 
pages. Most general questions will be answered in these pages. 
Contact the Financial Aid Office to speak with your counselor for 
assistance with any specific questions you may have. 

Eligibility Criteria 

In order to qualify for financial aid a student must; 

• Be a U.S. citizen, or eligible non-citizen per Immigration and 
Naturalization Service (INS) regulations. 

• Be admitted to the University. 

• Not have received a bachelor's degree or its equivalent. Some 
forms of aid are offered to post-undergraduate students as 
specifically noted under "Bachelor's Degree Holders." 

• Not have received aid for the maximum number of allowable 
semesters (eight). 

• Not have defaulted on a previous federal loan. 

• Be matriculated in a program that terminates in a degree 
or certificate. 

• Be enrolled as a full-time student. (A full-time student is one 
who is registered for at least 12 credits per semester.) The 
University offers some types of financial aid to part-time stu- 
dents. For undergraduates, part-time is defined as 6-1 1.5 credits. 
For graduate students, part-time is defined as 4.5-8.5 credits. 
Some forms of aid are offered to less than full-time students as 
specifically noted under "Part-Time Students." 

• Maintain satisfactory academic progress as defined by the 
University. 

• Apply for financial aid by the deadline. 

, • Demonstrate financial need as determined by the analysis of the 
Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). 



iity of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



213 



Deadlines 

Deadlines are used to assist the University in determining how 
many students wish to be considered for aid from the available 
funds. We also use deadlines so that we will receive the necessary 
information, and be able to forward a response to you, in time for 
you to make important decisions regarding your enrollment plans. 

Students who miss the filing deadlines may not receive all of the 
aid for which they may have been eligible. Late applicants are also 
subject to out-of-pocket expenditures for aid that has not been 
processed, as well as the withholding of registration and class atten- 
dance in the event of outstanding balances. 

All eligible students are considered for financial assistance 
regardless of filing date, depending upon availability of funds. 
However. University-administered funds will not be used to replace 
federal or state grants, or loans for which a student may have been 
eligible but for which he/she failed to apply successfully. 

Currently Enrolled Students 

The University of tiie Arts' postmark deadline for submission 
of tlie FAFSA is Marcli 15, 2004. 

All students who plan to attend the University during the Fall 
2004 or Spring 2005 semesters must file the FAFSA by the above 
deadline. Incomplete applications, and applicafions submitted after 
March 15 will be considered only after on-time applicafions have 
been awarded. Some types of aid {University Grants, Scholarships, 
SEOG Grants, Perkins Loans, Federal Work Study, and PHEAA 
Grants) are awarded on an on-fime basis and may not be available to 
otherwise eligible but late applicants. 

New Students 

Tiie University of tlie Arts' postmarli deadline for submission 
of the FAFSA is March 1,2004. 

All students who plan to attend the University during the Fall 
2004 or Spring 2005 semesters must file the FAFSA by the above 
deadline. Incoming students are considered on a rolling, funds-avail- 
able basis after the 1 st. Applicants are advised to submit all 
application materials by March 1, or as soon as possible. Some 
sources of funding (as above) are limited and will not be available to 
otherwise eligible but late apphcants. 

Award Letter Deadlines 

The response date on the award letter is the date by which the 
University requests confirmafion of the acceptance of the 
University's offer of financial aid. (Financial aid includes all offers 
of Scholarships, Grants, Loans, and Work Study.) Students are not 
obligated to the University in any way by confirming the award, and 
will not be penalized in any way by doing so. By confirming the 
award, the student reserves those funds. 

If the University does not receive a confirmation from the stu- 
dent we will assume that he/she does not wish these funds to be 
reserved, and will rescind the entire financial aid offer. 

New students are strongly urged to confirm their awards from the 
University of the Arts even if they have not made their final college 
choice. 

Stafford/PLUS Application Deadline: 

The March 15, 2004, Stafford/PLUS deadline is a suggested 
deadline. Eligibility for these loans will not be affected if applica- 
fions are submitted after March 15. Students should submit loan 
application(s) as soon as they have decided which college to 



attend in the fall because loan applications require six to eight weeks 
of processing time. 

We cannot guarantee that loan applications that are submitted 
after May 1 , 2004, will be processed in time for fall billing. If a loan 
applicafion(s) is submitted late, the student will be required to pay 
tuition from other resources and then wait to be reimbursed from 
loan proceeds. 

PHEAA State Grant Deadlines-All Students 

The state's deadline for receipt of the completed FAFSA applica- 
tion is May 1, 2004, for the following year (2004-2005). 
Applications received after that date may render a student ineligible 
for PHEAA Grants as well as the other types of aid specified above. 

Duration of Eligibility 

Under federal and University guidelines, undergraduate students 
may continue to receive financial aid for only eight semesters, or 
until the first baccalaureate degree or its equivalent has been earned. 

Students are no longer eligible for aid once they have either com- 
pleted the requirements for the degree or have completed the 
equivalent number of credits. 

Students may not receive undergraduate grants to complete 
minors, double degrees, or teacher certification programs that extend 
beyond eight semesters. 

Students are not permitted to delay graduation in order to con- 
tinue their eligibility for aid. 

Students can also exhaust their eligibility for financial aid by 
failing or withdrawing from courses. 

If you have questions about your states please contact the 
Financial Aid Office. 

Financial Aid Application Procedure 

Prerequisite 

To be considered for financial aid, students must be accepted for 
admission to the University or be currently enroUed and making sat- 
isfactory academic progress as defined by the University. 

Requisite 

All students who wish to be considered for financial aid must file 
the Free Applicafion for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). The infor- 
mation must be released to the U.S. Department of Education and to 
the University. 

The FAFSA is basic to the University's Financial Aid application 
process and is essential to the determination of the student's ehgi- 
bility for all types of aid (Pell, FSEOG, and PHEAA Grants, 
University Scholarships, as well as Federal Work Study and loans). 
A student cannot be considered for any type of financial aid until a 
correct and complete FAFSA has been processed. 

The University does not require the CSS, ACT. FAF, Profile, 
or other financial aid applicafions to be considered for financial 
assistance. 

The Department of Education has provided an easy way to apply 
electronically for aid. With Internet access, the FAFSA can be com- 
pleted and filed at http://www.fafsa.ed.gov. 

Students can also file using software provided by the Department 
of Education by downloading the FAFSA Express from the Depart- 
ment's Web page at http://www.ed.gov/offices/OPE/express.html. 

Remember, no matter how a student decides to file, he/she should 
submit only ONE applicafion each year. 



214 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



The paper FAFSA application must be mailed directly to the 
processor in the envelope provided and requires approximately four 
weeks to process. 

Transfer students may be required to submit financial aid tran- 
scripts to the University from post-secondary institutions attended in 
the current year, whether or not aid was received. This regulation 
applies to transfer students who enroll beginning in January. It does 
not apply to transfer students who enroll beginning in September. 

Declining Financial Aid 

If a student declines his/her offer of financial aid or admission, the 
University will rescind all offers of financial assistance (scholar- 
ships, grants, loans, and work study). If that student later decides to 
enroll at the University, he/she will be reconsidered for assistance at 
that point. Eligibility for financial assistance may be greatly reduced 
at a later point, and will be determined on a funds-available basis. 

Title IV Code 

? The University's Federal Title IV code is 003350. 

State Grant Information 

Residents of Pennsylvania (per PHEAA"s guidelines) will be eval- 
uated for a PHEAA Grant by filing the FAFSA. PHEAA deadline 
May 1. FAFSA serves as the state grant application. 

Residents of Alaska, Connecticut, Delaware, District of 
Columbia, Maine, Massachusetts, Ohio, Rhode Island, Vermont, or 
West Virginia, please note these additional deadlines: 

Connecticut deadline February 1 : state grant application required. 

District of Columbia deadline June 28: district grant application 
required. 

Rhode Island deadline March 1 : FAFSA seires as state grant 
application. 
I . West Virginia deadline June 28: state grant application required. 

Students who are residents of these states and are currently 
receiving a state grant MUST file the Free Application for Federal 
Student Aid (FAFSA). A separate state grant application form may 
also need to be submitted to the higher educadon assistance agency 
in the student's home state. 

If the state grant can be used in Pennsylvania, it is "portable." 
Portable state grants may be less at UArts than if used at a college in 
a student's home state. 

Residents of states not listed above are prevented by their state 
from using their state grants in Pennsylvania. 

Types of Aid 

Each student who completes a FAFSA will be considered for all 
of the following types of aid. Parental enrollment will not be consid- 
ered when eligibility for University aid is calculated. 

Institutional Scholarships 
and Grants 

University Scholarships 

University Scholarships are awarded on the basis of academic 
excellence and demonstrated talent. The Presidential, Promising 
, Artist, and Artist Grant are types of University Scholarships. 

University Scholarships are awarded v^hen students are admitted. 



Those students who demonstrate exceptional artistic ability and out- 
standing academic achievement will be considered for University 
scholarships. 

To assist students and their families with financial planning for 
their enrollment, scholarship amounts are fixed and renewable so 
long as the student makes academic progress. 

Named Scholarships 

The University offers a number of scholarships that have been 
donated by individuals or groups to help support promising artists. 
These named scholarships are awarded based on need and merit. 

University Grant 

University Grants are need-based and are awarded by the 
Financial Aid Office to supplement all other financial aid assistance. 

Students must be enrolled for at least 12 credits in order to receive 
Institutional Aid that is merit-based. 



Federal/State Grants 



Pell Grant 

The Pell Grant is a federally funded program that awarded indi- 
\'idual grants in amounts ranging from 5400 to $4,000 in 2002-2003. 
Pell Grants are awarded to students who have not received a bach- 
elor's degree nor been aided for the maximum number of semesters 
allowed. 

Eligibility is determined by the federal government and notifica- 
fion is sent directly to the student in the form of a Student Aid 
Report (SAR). The student should expect to receive the SAR 
approximately four weeks after the FAFSA has been filed. The SAR 
should be reviewed for accuracy and corrected if necessary. The cor- 
rect SAR should be retained by the student as confirmation of 
receipt of the FAFSA. Students must enroll for at least three credits 
in order to be eligible for the Pell Grant. 

University scholarships are awarded when students are admitted. 
Those students who demonstrate exceptional artistic ability and out- 
standing academic achievement will be considered for University 
scholarships. 

To assist students and their families with financial planning for 
their enrollment, scholarship amounts are fixed and renewable so 
long as the student makes academic progress. 

PHEAA Grant 

Awards are made to Pennsylvania residents who have not 
attained the bachelor's degree nor been aided for the maximum 
number of semesters allowed (eight). 

Eligible students must demonstrate financial need, Pennsylvania 
residency, and be enrolled for at least six credits. To continue to be 
eligible for state grant assistance, a full-time student must complete 
a minimum of 24 credits per academic year 

An award letter may indicate an estimated state grant amount; 
however, eligibility is determined by the state, and official notifica- 
tion is sent directly to the student beginning in May. 

NOTE: Students must meet state residency requirements in accor- 
dance with PHEAA guidelines. PHEAA's filing deadline is 
May 1. 

Other states have scholarship programs for their residents. 
Information and applications are available from the respective state 
boards of education. 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



215 



Federal Supplemental Educational 
Opportunity Grant (FSEOG) 

FSEOG is a federally funded University administered program. 
These grants are awarded to needy students who do not hold a bach- 
elor's degree. Typically. FSEOG grants are first awarded to Pell 
Grant recipients who have met the fihng deadlines on a funds-avail- 
able basis. 

Outside Scholarships 

The University encourages students to explore all options for out- 
side scholarship assistance. Local businesses, foundations, churches, 
ijnions, civic organizations, etc., often sponsor scholarships that can 
be used toward educational costs. 

A good place to begin the search for outside scholarships is on- 
line at www.fastweb.com. This is a free scholarship search service. 

The University of the Arts does not recommend that students pay 
fees for financial aid information, or for scholarship searches. 
■ As a service to students, the Financial Aid Office maintains a 
scholarship notebook containing useful information about such 
funding. This notebook may be viewed in the Financial Aid Office. 

The Financial Aid Office must be notified if any additional 
awards are received. Notification of all grants and scholarships will 
be included in the award letter. 

Student Loans 

Student loans are available at low interest rates (capping at 8.25 
percent), and with extended repayment terms to assist students in 
meeting both tuition and living expenses. Because loan indebtedness 
has serious implications, students should carefully consider the 
amount of their borrowing (both yearly and cumulative) and borrow 
the minimum necessary to reasonably meet those expenses that 
remain above the Financial Aid Award. 

Students wishing to borrow should secure an application from the 
bank of their choice. All students, regardless of state of residency, 
may borrow from Pennsylvania banks and are urged to do so. The 
Financial Aid Office can provide an application from one of our rec- 
ommended lenders. 

All students must use the new Stafford application called the 
Master Promissory Note (MPN). Returning Students may secure a 
MPN from the same lender used previously. New Students' award 
letter package should include an MPN. 

Students who have previously received a Stafford using an MPN 
are not required to file another MPN for 10 years. 

Students who use PHEAA lenders must sijbmit all loan applica- 
tions (MPN and PLUS) directiy to PHEAA. Students who use 
out-of-state guarantors must submit loan applications to the 
University's Financial Aid Office. 

Students are encouraged to use a lender having PHEAA as a guar- 
antor. PHEAA has reduced the fees charged on student loans and 
provides financial incentives during repayment. 

If the student has previously borrowed under any of the student 
loan programs, he or she is encouraged to use the same bank to 
avoid having multiple loan payments upon graduation. 
(Pennsylvania borrowers are required to use the same lender.) 

All loan applications are based on the FAFSA application; thus 
this application is prerequisite to the filing of the loan application. 

While the loan application is an element of the Financial Aid 
application process, it is also a separate transaction between the stu- 
dent and his or her bank. It is critical that the student understand that 
it is he or she alone who is responsible for repaying funds borrowed. 



and that for most students this will be the most serious long-term 
financial obligation yet undertaken. 

All first-time borrowers are required to attend an Entrance Interview 
before loan funds will be released by the University. Additional infor- 
mation will be available at orientation and registration. 

All students must submit the Stafford Loan Application by 
March 15. 

Graduating students who have borrowed under any federal loan 
program (as well as those who leave the University prior to gradu- 
ating) are required to attend an Exit Interview. Students intending to 
discontinue enrollment at the University must contact the Financial 
Aid Office. 

Student Loan Programs 

Federal Perkins Loan (Perkins) 

Perkins is a federal loan that is need-based and is awarded by the 
University. The Federal Perkins Loan is currentiy offered at a fixed 
five percent interest rate and is repayable to the University over a 
maximum 10-year period. Repayment begins nine months after 
graduation or cessation of at least half-time enrollment at an eligible 
institution in an approved program of study. 

Because Perkins loan funds are limited, this loan is offered to the 
earliest applicants whose Expected Family Contribution (EEC) is 
lowest. Perkin loans are usually awarded to freshman and sopho- 
more students (junior and senior students have greater eligibility for 
Stafford loans). Notification of eligibility for this loan is included in 
the award letter. 

Parent Plus Loan For Undergraduate Students 
(PLUS) 

The parent of a dependent student may borrow up to the cost of 
education (which includes living expenses) minus any other finan- 
cial aid the student is scheduled to receive. Repayment begins 60 
days after loan funds have been disbursed. The PLUS loan interest 
rate is variable and caps at nine percent. Approval for the PLUS loan 
is based upon credit history. 

Loan applications are available from the lender of the student's 
choice. The parent must borrow from the same lender the student 
has chosen for the Stafford loan, unless that lender does not pailici- 
pate in the PLUS program. A PLUS loan cannot be approved until a 
complete FAFSA has been processed. 

Typically the loan application process requires six to eight weeks. 
In order to deduct the anticipated proceeds from a PLUS loan from 
the invoice, the loan must have been approved. Therefore, parents 
wishing to use PLUS proceeds toward the fall balance must submit a 
complete application by March 15 in order to deduct the amount of 
the anticipated loan check from the fall invoice. 

NJ Class Loan 

If a student's parent is a New Jersey resident, he/she may be inter- 
ested in the NJ Class loan, which may allow payments to be deferred 
while the student is enrolled. For information and application forms 
call 1-800-792-8670, or visit www.state.nj. us/treasury /osa. 



2l6 



The University of the Ans Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



Federal Stafford Student Loan (Stafford) 

-Applications for the Stafford loan are available from the lender of 
the student's choice. 

The University is pleased to recommend a preferred lender to 
those students who have not previously borrowed. Please contact the 
Financial Aid Office for additional information. 

A Stafford loan cannot be approved until a complete FAFSA has 
been processed. Students wishing to use proceeds from the Stafford 
loan must submit a complete application by March 15. Students who 
use Pennsylvania lenders must submit the loan application directly 
to the lender. Students who use out-of-state lenders must submit the 
loan application directly to the Financial Aid Office. 

Under federal regulations, only one Stafford loan may be 
processed for each student each year. 

I 

Stafford Loan Eligibility 

Undergraduate Students 

Undergraduate students are required to register for at least six 
credits each semester in order to receive funding from the Stafford 
program. 

Stafford loan eligibility is determined based upon the number of 
credits the undergraduate student has completed, according to the 
following schedule: 

- 29.75 credits Freshman maximum $2,625 

30 - 59.75 credits Sophomore maximum $3,500 

60 - 89.75 credits Junior maximum $5,500 

90 -I- credits Senior maximum $5,500 

The above loan amounts may be subsidized or unsubsidized 
depending upon the student's financial eligibility. If the loan is sub- 
sidized the student is not responsible for making any interest or 
principal payments during enrollment. If the loan is unsubsidized 
the student is responsible for making interest payments during 
enrollment. 

Undergraduate students who are independent and dependent stu- 
dents whose parents cannot qualify for the PLUS loan are eligible 
for the following additional amounts under the Unsubsidized 
Stafford Program. . 

- 29.75 credits Freshman maximum $4,000 

30 -59.75 credits Sophomore maximum $4,000 

60 - 89.75 credits Junior maximum $5,000 

90 -I- credits Senior maximum $5,000 

Graduate Students 

Graduate Students are required to register for at least 4.5 credits 
each semester in order to receive funding from the Stafford program. 

Subsidized Stafford Loan Eligibility up to $ 8.500 
Unsubsidized Stafford Loan Eligibility up to $10,000 

(Total graduate maximum Stafford eligibility per academic year 
$18,500) 



PLUS/Stafford 

The lender will deduct Origination and insurance fees from 
Stafford and PLUS loans before they are disbursed. These fees can 
total up to four percent of the principal amount borrowed. Thus, the 
amount available from the loan to pay educational costs may be less 
than the amount initially borrowed. 

Students who are in default on a federal loan are not eligible for 
Stafford or Perkins loans, or other financial aid while enrolled at The 
University of the Arts. 

Students and their parents are strongly urged to make an appoint- 
ment in the Financial Aid Office to discuss questions regarding any 
of the student loan programs. 

PHEAA Loan Line (to check on the status of your loan): 

1-800-692-7392 or www.pheaa.org 
Remember: 

If a student uses his/her Stafford or PLUS loan proceeds toward the 
fall invoice, he/she must submit the loan application(s) by March 15. 

Disbursement Amount 

The lender will deduct origination and insurance fees from 
Stafford. PLUS, and other alternative loans before they are dis- 
bursed. These fees can total up to four percent (or more for some 
alternative loans) of the principal amount; thus, the amount available 
from the loan to pay educational costs may be less than the amount 
borrowed. 

Student Employment 

Federal Work Study (FWS) 

FWS is a federally funded program administered by the 
University. Eligibility for this program is based upon the availability 
of funds to the University and the student's EEC. 

The Financial Aid Office will make a determination of the stu- 
dent's eligibility to earn money through the FWS Program. 
Notification of eligibility will be included in the Award letter. 

A FWS award is not an offer or a guarantee of a job; it is the 
amount a student is eligible to earn should she or he secure a job. 
Work study awards are not applied against the invoice. Payment is 
made directly to employed students by University payroll check. 

Eligible students are permitted to work up to 20 hours weekly 
when classes are in session. Students are paid at least minimum 
wage and hours may be arranged to accommodate the class 
schedule. The 2003-2004 FWS award can be used between 
July 1.2003 and June 30. 2004. 

Jobs are usually available throughout the University in academic 
departments, security. University offices, the library, etc. Positions 
require various levels of skill and experience. 

For students who are interested in working in the larger commu- 
nity, there are several off-campus work study positions available. 
These jobs are located at sites such as community and arts organiza- 
tions, theaters, and museums. 

The Student Employment Handbook contains expanded informa- 
tion about FWS and NEWS, job openings, and additional 
information for fall placement. The handbook is available in the 
Financial Aid Office in late summer 

Non-Federal Work Study (NFWS) 

Students who do not qualify to work under the Federal Work 
Study program may work on-campus under the NFWS program. 



The University of tlie Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



217 



Information about job availability and placement is as listed in the 
Federal Work Study section. 

The Student Employment Handbook details all of the regulations 
governing the Federal and non-Federal Work Study programs. 

Students are reminded that falsifying time cards is a criminal 
offense, which can subject them to criminal prosecution, discipli- 
nary action, expulsion, and loss of all financial aid. 

Award Notification 

Award letters will be sent to new students beginning in March and 
to returning students beginning in June. The Financial Aid Office 
staff will be available to counsel students at any point during the 
application process. Students should be aware that some aid is con- 
ditional on the availability of funds to the University, and if these 
funds are reduced, the University will reduce aid accordingly. 

Students must return a signed award letter with acceptance of aid. 
Failure to return the award letter may result in cancellation of aid. 

If an award is estimated, that means some additional steps must 
be taken before the student can receive those funds, such as com- 
pleting verification. To receive the Stafford, the student must submit 
the loan application and his/her funds must be disbursed. Stafford 
loan proceeds are disbursed electronically or by paper check. He/she 
must endorse the Perkins loan promissory note in order for this loan 
to be credited to his/her account. 

Additional steps are required to claim these forms 
of financial aid: 

Federal Work Study 

In order to claim a FWS award the student must locate an eligible 
job. Once hired, the student must come to the Financial Aid Office to 
complete the necessary payroll paperwork. Students cannot work, 
nor can they be paid, until this paperwork is submitted and proper 
identification is documented. FWS cannot be deducted from the 
tuifion invoice. 

Pell Grant 

Approximately four weeks after the FAFSA is filed, the student 
will receive a Student Aid Report (SAR). This document will notify 
a student as to Pell Grant eligibility. All of the information on the 
SAR must be correct and complete. 

The award letter will list the Pell Grant amount. Changes to the 
FAFSA information may affect the student's Pell Grant eligibility. 

Perkins Loan 

To claim these funds the student must endorse a Perkins promis- 
sory note in the Student Billing Office. Funds cannot be credited 
until a complete, correct note is negotiated. 

PLUS and Stafford Loans 

These loans must be applied for through the student's lender 
Proceeds from these loans are disbursed to the University. Most 
Stafford loans will be disbursed to the University electronically and 
will not require the student's signature. If a student loan is disbursed 
by check, it cannot be credited to his/her account until he/she signs 
the check. (Stafford loan checks will be available in the Finance 
Office for signature; PLUS checks will be mailed to the parent bor- 
rower.) 



The award notice is subject to revision under the following 
circumstances: 

1. If government funding levels to the University are reduced, 
individual awards will be adjusted accordingly. 

2. Verification - The Financial Aid Office is required by federal 
reguladon to resolve any discrepancies in information submitted per 
verificafion with that already in a student's file. Any discrepancies 
may result in revision to a student's aid amounts and/or types. 

3. As above, if at any point in the year we become aware of infor- 
mation that conflicts with other documentation in the student's file, 
we will resolve the discrepancy and revise the award accordingly. 

4. Outside Scholarships - Per federal regulation, a student is not 
permitted to be "overawarded." That is, a student's total amount of 
scholarships, grants, loans, and work study may not exceed the stu- 
dent's calculated need. If a student would be overawarded due to an 
outside scholarship, we are required to adjust the other elements of 
the aid package to eliminate the overaward. We encourage students 
to seek outside scholarships, and will adjust institutional aid only if 
absolutely necessary. 

5. The University may substitute other aid funds of equal 
amount and type at any point in the year at its discretion and 
without any notice. 

Special Circumstances 

income Reduction 

The FAFSA collects information about a family's income and 
assets from the previous year (2002). For most people this informa- 
tion is a good predictor of the current year's (2003) income, since 
most people do not experience wide swings in income from year 
to year. 

If however, a family's income in the current year will be signifi- 
cantly different (more than 10 percent) from last year's, the family 
should notify the Financial Aid Office in writing, including all 
available documentation. Reductions in income that are caused 
by involuntary job loss, unusually high unreimbursed medical 
expenses, separation, divorce, death of a wage earner, or the like will 
be considered. 

If a family's circumstances meet these criteria, the University will 
calculate the financial aid award based upon the estimated current 
year (2003) figures for the fall semester At the end of the fall 
semester the family will be required to provide documentation (such 
as final pay stub, or an estimated 2003 return) for evaluation of the 
spring semester's award. 

Unfortunately, the University is not able to consider reductions in 
income due to voluntary job changes, back taxes owed, high con- 
sumer debt, multiple mortgages, employment bonuses received in 
the previous year, overtime, self-employment losses, fluctuations in 
income from commission sales, or discretionary purchases. 

Divorce or Separation 

When a married student or parent separates from or divorces 
his/her spouse .subsequent to the filing of the financial aid applica- 
tion, the custodial parent should notify the Financial Aid Office in 
writing. 

In the case of separation or divorce, the Financial Aid Office is 
permitted to discuss the student's record only with the custodial 
parent. 



218 



The University of the Ans Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



Death 

Sadly, the University occasionally is called upon to assist a student 
whose parent or spouse has died subsequent to the filing of the finan- 
cial aid application. Should this occur, the Financial Aid Office should 
be contacted immediately, and it will offer every assistance possible. 

Dependency Override 

The Financial Aid Office is occasionally asked to re-evaluate a 
student's status due to the student's assertion that he or she should 
be considered independent of parental support. 

The guidelines for dependency are set by federal law, and thus 
each student must first be evaluated against them. A dependent stu- 
dent is someone who is younger than 24, is not a veteran, is not a 
graduate or professional student, is not married, is not an orphan or 
ward of the court, or does not have legal dependents. 

An independent student is someone who is older than 24, a vet- 
eran, a graduate or professional student, married, or has legal 
dependents. (See the FAFSA.) 

Federal and institutional policy is that the first responsibihty for 
college costs is the student's and his/her family's; thus appeals are 
rarely granted. 

A student who wishes to be considered independent must write a 
letter of appeal to the Financial Aid Office. The letter must clearly 
state the reasons for appealing the dependency status. The student 
will be required to document his/her means of support as well as 
other items. Please contact the Financial Aid Office for additional 
information. . . ' ' 

Other Appeals 

The Financial Aid office cannot consider proposals based on any 
circumstances other than those listed above. Regrettably, the 
University cannot reconsider the financial aid award in response to 
offers from competing institutions, or as a means of recognizing the 
student's academic or artistic achievement. 

Academic Progress 

Students who receive assistance in any form, which includes but 
is not limited to University grant, scholarship. State grant. Federal 
Pell Grant, FSEOG, FWS, Federal Perkins Loan, Federal 
PLUS/Stafford, etc., must maintain satisfactory academic progress 
in their program of study in order to conUnue to receive those funds. 

Satisfactory academic progress for students at the University is 
defined as 

1. earning between 12 and 18 credits each semester, and 

2. maintaining a minimum cumulative and semester grade-point 
average (GPA) of at least 2.0 ("C" average). 

If a student's semester or cumulative grade-point average is below 
2.0 ("C" average), he or she is automatically placed on probation 
and required to attain at least a 2.0 cumulative grade-point average 
by the end of the next semester, and meet other requirements as 
specified by the dean's office. 

Students may be required to maintain a GPA higher than 2.0 in 
some departments or majors. Thus, it is possible to be placed on pro- 
bation at higher GPAs. 

A student who does not meet the above-cited grade-point 
average and credit load requirements will jeopardize his/her 
financial aid eligibility. 

Students who have had two semesters of academic probation are 
not eligible to receive financial aid of any type during a third 
semester of academic probation. 



Students who receive University-sponsored scholarships may be 
required to maintain a GPA greater than 2.0 ("C" average). The stu- 
dent will be notified of specific GPA requirements when receiving 
notification of the scholarship. Specific scholarship GPA require- 
ments are as follows: 

Presidential Scholarship 3.0 

Promising Artist Scholarship 2.5 

Artist Grant 2.5 

University Grant 2.0 

Students who have been dismissed from the University are not eh- 
gible for financial assistance of any kind during the first semester of 
re-enrollment, when the first semester of re-enrollment is at least the 
student's third semester of censure. 

Insufficient Credit Accumulation 

In addition to the qualitative standard (GPA), students are also 
required to meet a quantitative measure of academic progress (rate of 
credit accumulation). Students who receive merit- and/or need-based 
aid must earn sufficient credits each semester toward graduation. 
Students who enroll for at least 12 credits during a given semester 
must complete, with a grade of "D" or higher, at least 12 credits in 
order to continue to receive financial assistance. 

Although 12 credits is the minimum per-semester credit accumu- 
lation to maintain eligibility for financial assistance, the student will 
NOT be on track to graduate in four years at this rate. Also, "D" 
grades will cause the student to fail the qualitative (GPA) progress 
standard. 

Each student's total credit accumulation is reviewed at the end of 
each semester. Students who complete fewer than 24 credits per aca- 
demic year will be placed on FINANCIAL AID PROBATION for 
the following semester. If by the end of the probationary semester, 
the student has not earned at least 36 credits (for the three-semester 
period being reviewed), the student then loses his/her eligibility for 
financial assistance. Students may fail the quantitative standard 
regardless of GPA. 

The student's eligibility for financial assistance will be restored 
when the student has earned at least 36 credits and has met all other 
academic progress requirements. 

PHEAA Grants 

The state grant agency requires that a student earn a minimum of 
24 credits each academic year in order to continue to receive state 
grant assistance. Any student who earns fewer than 24 credits will 
not be eligible for his/her state grant for the first semester of the fol- 
lowing year. Students who enroll for a single semester are required 
to earn at least 12 credits to retain their PHEAA Grant. The 
University will not replace funds for which the students has lost 
eligibilty. 

Financial Aid Academic Progress 
Appeals 

University-Administered Financial Aid 

The University reviews the academic standing of all students at 
the conclusion of each semester. Students who have not met the aca- 
demic progress standards required for continued financial aid 
eligibility have the following options for appealing loss of aid. 

Please note — under federal privacy guidelines we are only 
permitted to discuss academic matters with the student. 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



219 



If the student wishes to appeal the loss of financial aid, except 
PHEAA state grant, he or she may do so in writing to the Financial 
Aid Office. (PHEAA state grant appeals must be addressed to 
PHEAA). Appeals are reviewed by the Financial Aid Appeal 
Committee. Appeal letters must be written by the student and must 
document significant, unusual circumstances that contributed to aca- 
demic difficulties. (Significant circumstances include events like 
major illness, severe injury, or family upheaval such as death or 
divorce). Students are required to provide documentation of the cir- 
cumstances upon which the appeal is based. 

In order to be considered the appeal letter requesting reinstate- 
ment of aid for a given semester must be received in the Financial 
Aid Oft'ice prior to the first day of classes for that semester Students 
are cautioned that the committee that reviews financial aid appeals 
meets on an as-needed basis and generally requires approximately 
three weeks to respond to appeals. Appeals that are submitted close 
to the beginning of any semester are unlikely to be reviewed prior to 
the start of classes. Thus, students should be prepared to pay their 
invoice in full. If the appeal is granted the student will be reimbursed 
from any credit balance created by reinstated financial aid. 

The University does not have the authority to make exceptions to 
federal financial aid policies and will not entertain any requests to 
do so. For example, federal law requires that students be enrolled on 
an at least half-time basis for Stafford loan eligibility. The 
University cannot and will not make exceptions to this and other 
federal regulations. 

Students who have been placed on academic probation and wish 
to appeal their probationary status should follow the guidelines 
under the Academic Review secUon in this catalog. 

For those financial aid policies under which the University has 
discretionary authority to make exceptions, the Financial Aid Appeal 
Committee's decisions are final and cannot be further appealed. 

PHEAA State Grant Appeals 

The University has no authority to make exceptions to PHEAA 
state grant policies. Students wishing to appeal the loss of state 
grants must write a letter of appeal to PHEAA. Appeal letters must 
include documentation of those significant events (major illness, 
severe injury, or family upheaval such as divorce or death) that 
impacted the student's academic performance. Students wishing to 
appeal the loss of state grant eligibility are urged to do so as soon as 
such information is known, as the state requires several weeks (typi- 
cally 8-10) to respond to appeals. 

Change in Enrollment Status 

Unless specifically designated otherwise, all awards are issued 
based upon the student's anticipated enrollment as a full-time under- 
graduate (completing 12 credits or more per semester, in a 
degree-granting program). 

Students who become less than full-time or who enroll as "non- 
degree" may lose their eligibility for aid in full or in part. 

The Financial Aid Office periodically reviews all student accounts 
and will immediately remove any aid credited to the account of a 
student who has failed to satisfy progress or enrollment require- 
ments as above. 

Students who are considering withdrawing (either from the 
University or from individual classes) are urged to meet with a 
financial aid counselor to discuss the impact of the withdrawal on 
their eligibility for aid. Please read the information about refunds in 
the "Tuition and Expenses" section of this Catalog. 



Students are reminded that withdrawing from their courses (either 
in full or in part) may cause them to lose their eligibility for aid in 
current and future semesters. 

To avoid unexpected balances, students must contact the Financial 
Aid Office with any questions pertaining to this subject. 

Graduate Students 

Graduate students are eligible to apply for Stafford loans and 
should refer to the section on student loans for further information. 
Graduate students may also be eligible for assistantships or fellow- 
ships through the department in which they are enrolled. Contact the 
departmental office for additional information and application 
instructions. 

Graduate students are required to maintain satisfactory academic 
progress in order to continue to receive financial aid as specified in 
this catalog. 

Students who have attained a bachelor's degree or its equivalent 
are not eligible to receive Pell, PHEAA, FSEOG, FWS, Perkins, and 
most other forms of financial aid including institutional grants. 

Graduate students who are in default on a federal student loan are 
not eligible to receive assistance of any type while enrolled at the 
University. 

The following Web site is helpful for graduate students: 
www.gradschools.com. 

Summer MFA Students 

Students who enroll at least half-time (4.5 credits) in the Summer 
MFA program may borrow under the Stafford Loan program. 

Students who matriculated as of June 2000 and follow the 12, 4.5, 
4.5 credit pattern are permitted to borrow during all semesters of 
enrollments and qualify for deferments: these students may borrow 
up to $18,500. 

Students who matriculated prior to June 2000 and follow the 10, 3, 3 
credit pattern are not permitted to borrow during the fall and spring 
semesters. Summer MFA students who are enrolled less than half-time 
are not peimitted to borrow and do not qualify for deferments. 

For the summer of 2003, Summer MFA students who enroll for 
10 credits may borrow up to $1 1,000, less any other aid. 

Transfer Students 

Transfer undergraduates are eligible for aid and should apply fol- 
lowing the same application procedures as other undergraduates 
(with exceptions listed below). 

All transfer students may be required to submit a Financial Aid 
Transcript (FAT) from each prior post-secondary institution attended 
in the cun'ent year, whether or not financial aid was received while 
enrolled. This regulation applies to transfer students who enroll 
beginning in January. It does not apply to transfer students who 
enroll beginning in September. 

Transfer students who have borrowed the undergraduate max- 
imum under the Stafford program are not eligible for continued 
Stafford assistance while enrolled at the University. 

Any transfer student who is in default on a federal loan is ineli- 
gible for financial aid of any type while enrolled at the University. 

Transfer students who enroll for the spring semester should be 
aware that financial aid received for enrollment during the fall 
semester at another institution is not transferable. Students must 
reapply for most forms of aid at the University. Contact the 
Financial Aid Office for additional information and instructions. 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



Bachelor's Degree Holders 

Students who have earned a bachelor's degree or its equivalent 
and who enroll as undergraduates are eligible to apply for Stafford 
loans (with exceptions below). In some cases these students may 
also be eligible for University-sponsored aid. Students are not eli- 
gible to receive PELL. PHEAA. FSEOG. and Perkins. 

Students who have already borrowed the undergraduate maximum 
under the Stafford program are ineligible for continued Stafford 
assistance while enrolled at the University. 

Those who are in default on a federal student loan are not eligible 
for aid of any type while enrolled at the University. 

Part-Time Students 

Part-time students who are enrolled in degree programs may be 
eligible for Pell, University, and PHEAA grants, as well as Stafford 
loans. 

Part-time students are subject to all requirements governing the 
financial aid programs, except that they be enrolled full-time. 

Part-time students are not eligible for merit-based aid. 

Part-time students should follow application procedures as 
detailed in this catalog. 

Continuing Education Students 

Students who enroll through the Continuing Education program 
are eligible for a very limited selection of loan programs. 
Continuing Education students are not eligible for any other type 
of financial aid. Contact the Financial Aid Office for additional 
information. 

International Students 

Students who are neither U.S. citizens nor eligible noncitizens (as 
confirmed by the Immigration and Naturalization Service) are not 
eligible to receive any form of Federal Title IV financial aid while 
enrolled at The University of the Arts. 

International students will be reviewed for scholarships when 
offered admission. Those students who demonstrate exceptional 
artistic ability in their portfolio review or audition will be considered 
for the University's Scholarship Program. 

International students may be eligible to borrow money through a 
very limited selection of loan programs. International students must 
have a U.S. citizen co-signer. Contact the Financial Aid Office for 
additional information. 

Study Abroad and Off-Campus Study 

Students who wish to study abroad or at another U.S. school for 
one or two semesters as part of the degree program at UArts will 
need the advice and approval of their department chair, a written 
agreement in advance of the courses, and a description of how they 
will transfer back into the degree program. This off-campus study is 
normally best done in the junior year. Interested students should 
begin by making an appointment in the Dean's office to discuss their 
plans at least six months before the program begins. Appointments 
with the Registrar. Financial Aid, and Billing offices are also recom- 
mended at that time. If the student has financial aid, he/she should 
register during the normal registration period. While away, the stu- 
dent should keep the Financial Aid Office informed of any changes 
in status. 

The following information should be used to assist in determinins 



if sUidy abroad will be a viable option, and to help plan for the 
financial responsibilities. 

Financial Aid that can be used abroad: 

1 . Federal Pell Grant 

2. Federal SEOG 

3. Federal Perkins Loan 

4. PHEAA State Grant 

5. Federal Stafford Loan 

6. Federal Plus Loan 

These forms of aid are subject to reduction if costs for study 
abroad programs are less than costs at The University of the Arts. 

Financial Aid that cannot be used abroad includes all University- 
sponsored aid, such as: 

1 . Talent Scholarship 

2. Presidential Scholarship 

3. University Grant 

4. Promising Artist Award 

5. Artist Grant 

6. Named Scholarships 

7. Graduate Grants, Scholarships, and Assistantships 

Students who plan to study abroad should apply for financial aid 
adhering to normal deadlines and procedures. Additionally, such stu- 
dents must provide The University of the Arts' Financial Aid Office 
with the following: 

1. Contact person at coordinating university or college including 
their address, telephone, and fax numbers. 

2. Power of Attorney, duly executed (if documents will require 
your signature in your absence.) 

3. Consortium Agreement, completed, (available from the 
Financial Aid Office.) 

4. Contact Financial Aid Office before final departure. It will be 
necessary to maintain close contact with our office to assure aid is 
processed before you leave the country. 

Reminders: 

1 . The study abroad program must be approved by both the aca- 
demic dean and the University's Office of the Registrar. Contact 
those offices for additional information and procedures. 

2. Students must begin all paperwork at least six months prior to 
the semester abroad. 

3. In most countries students will not be permitted to earn wages, 
so they should be prepared to have sufficient spending money. 

4. Students may not use financial aid for unapproved programs 
abroad. In order to be eligible for financial aid, the student must 
enroll through a college or university that is approved for participa- 
tion in the Federal Title IV programs. 

5. Students may not use the extended payment plan (TMS) to pay 
for tuition. 

Budgets 

Educational costs include not only tuition and fees, but also indi- 
rect costs such as room, food, books, supplies, and personal 
expenses. Direct costs reflect the actual amount a student will be 
billed by the University. Indirect costs are what a typical student 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



might expect for out-of-pocket expenses such as supplies, books, 
clothing, food, medical expenses, personal items, and transportation 
over a nine-month period. 

Naturally, one's own habits and personal spending patterns will 
dramatically influence these costs. Therefore, these are estimates 
only. 

These factors are used in formulating a student's budget and 
determining financial need. The Financial Aid Office will assign 
each student a budget depending on the information provided on the 
FAFSA. If the budgets shown below differ significantly from the 
expenses you expect to incur, please inform the Financial Aid 
Office. 

While certain academic departments may recommend that stu- 
dents have their own computers, the University's students are not 
required to provide their own computers. Therefore, the University 
will not accept responsibility for the funding of student-owned 
machines. Students interested in purchasing computers are welcome 
to contact the Academic Computing Office for advice on hardware 
and software selection, and information on the educational discounts 
available. For more information, please refer to the Academic 
Computing section of this catalog. 

Estimated Expenses for 2003-200^^ 

These figures are intended for your use in estimating your costs 
for the upcoming academic year. 







Resident/ 






Commuter 


Off-Campus 


Graduate 


Tuition (12-18 credits) $20,860 


$20,860 


$20,860 


General Fee 


850 


850 


850 


Housing 


— 


5.800 


— 


Subtotal 


$21,710 


$27,510 


$21,710 


Indirect Expenses 








Books & Supplies 


2,000 


2,000 


2,000 


Housing 


2,300 


— 


7,300 


Food 


1,800 


1,800 


1,800 


Living Expenses 


1,690 


1,690 


1,690 


Estimated Total 


$29,500 


$33,000 


$34,500 



Commuters 

Students who live within reasonable commuting distance of the 
University and reside with parents or relatives. 

Resident/Off-Campus 

Students who reside in University-owned housing or who reside 
in housing that is owned by neither the University nor their parents 
or relatives. Students who live within commuting distance of the 
University will not be funded as residents, or as off-campus. 

Graduate Students 

Most graduate students maintain their own homes and have corre- 
spondingly higher living expenses. Graduate students who live with 
parents or relatives will be assigned a commuter budget. 

Part-Time Students 

Budgets for part-time students are determined on an individual 
basis. 



Tuition Tax Benefits 

The Taxpayer Relief Act of 1997 includes tax credits for educa- 
tion. The Hope Scholarship is a tax credit of up to $1,500 that covers 
100 percent of the first $1,000 in qualified tuition and related 
expenses, and up to 50 percent of the second $1,000, required for 
enrollment during the first two years of college. 

The Hope tax credit is generally available for tuition and fees 
paid, less grants and scholarships, for classes that begin on or after 
January 1, 1998. The credit is phased out for single taxpayers with 
adjusted gross income between $40,000 and $50,000 (580,000 to 
$100,000 for joint returns). Students who do not qualify for the 
Hope Scholarship may qualify for the Lifetime Learning Credit. 

For specific information about how these tax credits may affect 
you, contact your tax professional. 

Confidentiality and Privacy of 
Financial Aid Information 

FERPA (Family Educational Rights and Privacy 
Act of 1974) 

Under FERPA educational privacy and access rights accrue to the 
student when she/he turns 18 OR enrolls in a post-secondary institu- 
tion. The University of the Arts is a post-secondary institution. 
Persons who have applied to but who have not attended the 
University as an enrolled student are not covered under FERPA. 
Under institutional policy, applicants are extended the same privacy 
and access rights to their financial aid information as students. 

Applicants, students, and parents should be aware of the fol- 
lowing institutional financial aid privacy policies. 

The financial aid staff is permitted to discuss or otherwise dis- 
close a student's financial aid information to the following parties: 

1 . the student. 

2. the student's parent(s) whose information appears on the FAFSA. 

3. other University officials having a legitimate educational 
reason to know the student's financial aid information (e.g. staff in 
the billing office so that they can manage the student's account). 

4. external agencies and organizations such as guarantors, lenders, 
state grant agencies, and auditors that have a legitimate reason to 
know the student's financial aid information (i.e. staff at such agen- 
cies authorized to process loans and grants for the student). 

5. external federal agencies granted such rights under FERPA 
(e.g. DOE, INS, CSPCA, et cetera). Under FERPA, institutions are 
required to disclose a student's information (sometimes without 
notification to the student) in response to commands from the courts 
(typically subpoenas) and demands from specific federal agencies. 
The Financial Aid staff will comply with all lawfully issued 
demands for information from the entities identified in the FERPA 
regulations and will (or will not) notify the student as required. 

Students and parents should be aware that their signatures on the 
FAFSA and other financial aid documents (e.g. loan applications) 
authorize the release of their information to certain federal and state 
agencies. Please read the FAFSA and other financial aid documents 
for more information. 

Depending upon the scope of the information requested by the 
student or other authorized parties, the Financial Aid Office may 
require time to present the records requested. When the information 
requested cannot be produced immediately the Financial Aid Office 
may require such time as is permitted under FERPA regulations to 
retrieve and present the records requested. 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 200S/2004 



The Financial Aid staff is not permitted to discuss or otherwise 
disclose a student's Financial Aid information to others including 
but not limited to: 

1 . the student's parent(s) or stepparent(s) whose information does 
not appear on the FAFSA (the non-filing parent) without written 
permission from the student and the filing parent. 

2. the student's parentis) or stepparent(s) whose information does 
appear on the FAFSA when the parents have separated or divorced 
and the other parent has been identified as the custodial parent, 
without written permission from the student and the custodial 
parent. 

3. high school guidance counselors and teachers. 

4. the student's spouse. 

5. interested relatives, neighbors, and friends. 

The Financial Aid Staff is not permitted to discuss or otherwise 
disclose academic information (which includes but is not limited to 
scholarship eligibility, financial aid eligibility, grades, grade-point 
average, academic standing, or probafionary status) to anyone 
(except the federal and state agencies responsible for processing the 
student's financial aid or having authority under FERPA to access 
such information) other than the student (whether or not the student 
is dependent, whether or not the parent pays the invoice) without the 
student's written authorization. 

Disclosure Authorization 

When extraordinary circumstances exist that prevent the student 
from accessing and understanding Financial Aid information the 
Financial Aid staff will discuss normally confidential information 
with the individual(s) the student designates on the disclosure 
authorizaUon form. Students may request a disclosure authorization 
form from the Financial Aid Office. Students must complete and 
sign the disclosure authorization form in the Financial Aid Office in 
the presence of a Financial Aid staff member. Students can rescind 
the disclosure authorization at any time. Due to the highly .sensitive 
nature of financial aid and academic information, facsimiles, photo- 
copies or mailed disclosure authorization forms will not be 
accepted. 

Rights and Responsibilities 

The receipt of financial aid is a privilege, which creates both 
rights and responsibilities. 

Students have the right to know the method used to determine 
their need: the right to have access to information and records used 
in determining need; and the right to be awarded aid as equitably as 
funds permit. 

Students applying for financial aid are responsible for accurately 
portraying financial resources and circumstances and notifying the 
Financial Aid Office of any changes in status: for applying in a 
timely manner: and for maintaining satisfactory academic progress 
and good standing. 

Students who fail to maintain adequate progress will be placed on 
probation. Failure to correct academic deficiency will result in the 
loss of financial aid until the required credits and grade-point 
average have been earned. 

Students or parents who knowingly provide false information on 
any financial aid form (financial aid forms include but are not lim- 
ited to the FAFSA, verification forms. Work Study time cards and 
loan applications) will be denied financial aid and will be refused for 
all subsequent years without the possibility of appeal. Additionally, 



students so identified will he billed for all aid disbursed and may 
face prosecution by the Department of Education, which may result 
in fine, imprisonment, or both. 

While the Financial Aid Office staff is available to assist students 
through the application process, it is the student's responsibility to 
see to the correctness and completeness of his or her application. If a 
student receives notification that his/her FAFSA or loan application 
is incomplete, the student must determine what is necessary to com- 
plete the application(s) and submit the required information. 

An application for financial aid will have no effect on the decision 
concerning admission. The admission decision is made without 
access to financial aid data. 

Application for 2004-2005 

• File the 2004-2005 Free Application for Federal Student Aid 
(FAFSA) by March 15. 2004. 

• Register for the Fall 2004 semester in April 2004. 

Additional Sources of Financial Aid 

A helpful way to begin the search for additional financial assis- 
tance is on the Internet at www.fastweb.com. Additional financial 
aid Web sites are listed below. Students are cautioned not to pay for 
financial aid information: these are free Web sites. The Financial Aid 
Office also maintains a notebook of scholarships. 

www.pheaa.org 

www.fafsa.ed.gov 

www.finaid.org 

www.fastweb.com 

www.cashe.com 

www.ed.gov 

www.usagroup.com 

www.cns.gov 

For Additional Information 

Listed below are numbers to call if a student receives an incom- 
plete notification or does not receive notification within six weeks of 
application filing. 

To check the status of your FAFSA: 

1-319-337-5665 

1-800-4-FEDAID 

www.fafsa.ed.20v 



PHEAA Grant Line 

1-800-692-7435 

www.pheaa.org 

The University of the Arts 
1-800-6 16- ARTS 
www.uarts.edu 



PHEAA Loan Line 

1-800-692-7392 

www.pheaa.org 

Office of Financial Aid 
1-2I5-7I7-6170 
fax 1-215-717-6178 
www.finaid@uarts.edu 



Inquiries and requests for application forms should be directed to: 

The University of the Arts 
Office of Financial Aid 
320 South Broad Street 
Philadelphia. PA 19102 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



223 



student Services 



John Klinzing, Dean of Students 

jklinzing@uarts.edu 

Gershman Hall 

401 South Broad Street, Room 309 

215-717-6618 

The Student Services Division consists of a group of profes- 
sionals committed to assisting students of the University in reaching 
their goals. The division provides students with opportunities to 
develop the interpersonal, leadership, organizational, and communi- 
cations skills that will serve them on a personal and professional 
level. The office of the Dean of Smdents administers and coordi- 
nates student services and represents student concerns to campus 
groups, faculty, staff, and administration. 

Counseling Center 

Attending college can be a time of major adjustment for both 
undergraduate and graduate students. There are times when students 
need support to help them work through this transition. The 
University of the Arts Counseling Center offers counseling and 
workshops that can provide this support. 

If a student is seeing a psychiatrist at home, the University recom- 
mends that he/she establish a relationship with a professional closer 
to the University. This will help monitor symptoms and medications 
in a more consistent way and provide a more immediate level of care 
should a crisis arise. Counseling and Health Services can help with 
referrals to other professionals. 

All counseling and medical issues are strictly confidential. 

As with medical emergencies, students are strongly encouraged to 
carry health insurance for psychological emergencies. 

Brian Hainstock, Director of Counseling 

215-717-6614 

Gershman Hall ' ., 

40 1 South Broad Street, Room 308 

Health Services 

The University maintains a health office with a Registered Nurse 
from Monday through Friday during the academic year and for six 
weeks in the summer. First aid is rendered, minor illnesses treated, 
and appropriate referrals to other health professionals are made. 
Health counseling is offered, emphasizing disease prevention, health 
maintenance, stress control, and wellness activities. 

Medical services are offered to UArts students by contractual 
agreement with Jefferson Family Medicine Associates (JFMA), a 
group of physicians who specialize in Family Medicine Practice. 
Students may use these doctors as they would use their family physi- 
cian at home and need only a referral from the University's nurse to 
obtain an appointment. Besides treafing acute and chronic illnesses, 
there are services for drug abuse, sexually transmitted diseases, birth 
control, and mental health. University of the Arts students are not 
charged for these office visits. There will be charges for these serv- 
ices if specialists are called in, if X-ray or laboratory work is 
needed, and for emergency room visits. 

In the event of an emergency after office hours, JFMA physicians 
are on call 24 hours a day, seven days a week, and may be reached 
by phone. 



Jefferson Family Medicine Associates 

Telephone: 215-955-7190 

JFMA is located at: 

833 Chesmut Street, Suite 301 

By appointment through Health Services 

JFMA hours: 

9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday 

1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. Thursday 

If an ambulance is necessary, the student will be billed for this 
service. The cost of the emergency room visit is the responsibility of 
the student. 

Because of the high cost of medical care. The University of the 
Arts strongly recommends that students have adequate health insur- 
ance to cover unforeseen illness or accident. For those students not 
enrolled in an insurance program of their parents and who need low- 
cost insurance, the University offers various insurance plans. 
Information and brochures may be obtained at the Health Office. 

Health Records 

All entering students must have a physical exam, complete the 
Student Health Form, and file it with the Office of Health Services. 
In addition, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania insists that univer- 
sities screen for immunization deficiencies of all first-time students. 
Students failing to meet these requirements will not be allowed to 
attend classes. 

Anne Whitehead, Director 

Anderson Hall Office: 215-717-6230 ' ,, . 

333 South Broad Street. Room M-36 , ' 

Terra Building Office: 215-717-6232 

2 1 1 South Broad Street, 4th floor. Room 401 

Student Activities/Special Events 

The Student Activities Office sponsors a variety of activities to 
complement the academic programs. Annual events include a 
Halloween party, a Fall Carnival, and the popular UArts Late Night 
Skate. Other events include Grocery Bingo, open mic nights, and 
trips to New York and Washington, D.C, 

Students play a major role in determining the character of the stu- 
dent life program. There are many opportunities for involvement and 
leadership. The University Student Council helps develop, plan, and 
implement changes that benefit the student body. Students are wel- 
comed and encouraged to join this organization, which acts as the 
voice of the student body in the University governance system. 

Student clubs and organizations also contribute to campus activi- 
ties, and students are encouraged to investigate the opportunities 
these groups have to offer. Organizations include the African 
American Student Union, UArts Christian Fellowship, Fencing 
Club, Green Team, Rainbow Connection, and Gallery One. 

To encourage participation in sports and physical fitness, the 
University offers partially subsidized membership in a local fitness 
center. For more information about any of these opportunities, con- 
tact the Student Activities Office. 

Sandra K. Tilford, Director of Student Activities 

215-717-6615 

Gershman Hail 

401 South Broad Street, Room 313 



224 



The University of the Alls Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



Residential Life 

The University of the Arts has made a strong commitment to pro- 
viding a supportive living/learning environment. The University has 
four residence halls on campus. All residence halls are furnished and 
have separate bathroom and kitchen facilities in each apartment. 
Each building has laundry facilities and 24-hour security and main- 
tenance. All residence halls are "smoke free." 

Fumess Hall is a historic remodeled building highlighted by its 
high ceilings and tall windows. It is a four-story building with two 
separate wings and has large studio, and one- and two-bedroom 
apartments, housing three to four residents. 

The 1500 Pine Street Residence Hall is a 10-story building, which 
has studio and one- and two-bedroom apartments, housing two 
to five residents. It features hardwood floors and a studious 
environment. 

The 1228 Spruce Street Residence Hall is a recently acquired 
eight-story building with studio apartments housing two students. 
It features walk-in closets. 

The 3 1 1 Juniper Street Residence Hall is also a recendy acquired 
and newly renovated 12-story building with one- and two-bedroom 
apartments housing two to four students. It features spacious 
kitchens with built-in microwave ovens, air conditioning, wall-to- 
wall carpeting, and Internet/cable hookups. 

All living environments are supervised by specially selected 
Resident Assistants. RAs are upper-class students, trained in peer 
advising and crisis intervention, who assist students in their adjust- 
ment to college as well as to life in the city. The residence program 
is supervised by the Director of Residential Life. 

It is important for residents to understand that they must abide by 
the standards listed in the housing contract. Failure to do so makes 
them subject to the penalities listed in the contract. 

Students receive a housing packet outlining all facilities and 
accommodations after they are admitted to the University. All new 
students are guaranteed housing if their housing deposits are 
received by June 1 . On-campus housing for students after their first 
year is determined on a first-come first-served basis. 

The Residential Life Office assists students in finding off-campus 
accommodations through its off-campus housing service. Early 
inquiries regarding this information are strongly recommended. 

Glenn Smith. Director 

215-875-2256 

1500 Pine Street, Room 100 

gsmith@uarts.edu 

Meals 

Almost all student residences feature separate kitchens within 
each apartment. Students prepare their own meals according to their 
individual schedules and dietary preferences. In addition, the 
University maintains a cafe that serves breakfast and lunch, and has 
an optional meal plan. Snack and beverage vending machines are 
accessible at all times. 

Academic Support Services 

The Academic Support Services are available to all students as a 
supplement to their classroom instruction. Tutors help students 
develop sidlls in reading, writing, and other academic and studio 
areas, including successful classroom strategies and improvement of 
study habits. 



Professional and peer tutoring are available to undergraduate stu- 
dents for general skills and for specific subjects or courses. 
Computer-assisted academic instruction is also available. 

The International Student Advisor will also assist students from 
abroad in securing support ser\ices. Although students may be 
referred to the services by their instructors, students are also wel- 
come to avail themselves freely of these support services. 

For more information, please contact: 

Anita Lam, Director 

Academic Support Services 

215-875-2262 

1500 Pine Street, Room 102 

alam@uarts.edu 

Academic Acliievement/ACT loi 
Program 

The Academic Achievement/ ACT 101 Program (AAP) is part of 
the Higher Education Opportunity Act of the Commonwealth of 
Pennsylvania. At The University of the Arts, the purpose of the pro- 
gram is to provide developmental maintenance and transition 
ser\ices to students who need preparation in arts and academics. 
Students selected to participate in the program must be Pennsylvania 
residents with financial and/or academic needs. With the extra sup- 
port of the AAP, these students become a highly motivated, cohesive 
group whose determination to succeed is reflected in their high 
retention and success rates. 

Each year, a small number of students receive conditional admis- 
sion to the University under the Academic Achievement/ ACT 101 
Program. These students are mandated to attend the Summer Bridge 
Intensive, receive tutoring and counseling during the semester, and 
attend a midsemester review to ensure their success the first two 
years. To further assist these students, the University also awards an 
AAP Grant to them so they will be less burdened by financial 
demands and can focus on their education. 

For more infonnation. contact the Academic Achievement Program. 

Anita Lam, Director 

215-875-2262 . ' 

1500 Pine Street, Room 102 

alam@uarts.edu 

Learning Sl<ills Specialist 

The University is committed to assuring equal educational oppor- 
tunity for students with learning disabilities. The goal of the 
Learning Skills Center is to assist students to maximize their poten- 
tial while maintaining their independence. Eligibility for services is 
determined individually based on documented need. Services 
include direct instruction, monitoring, and consultation. The 
Learning Skills Specialists acts as a liaison between students and 
faculty. Academic accomodations and adjustments are provided 
when appropriate. This is a confidential service. 

For additional information, please contact: 

Neila Douglas, Learning Skills Specialist 

ndouglas@uarts.edu 

215-717-6616 

Gershman Hall 

401 South Braod Street, Room 309C 

For assistance with any other type of disability, students should 
contact the Dean of Students at 2 1 5-7 1 7-66 1 8. 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



225 



International Student Services 

In an effort to meet the special needs of the international student, 
the University has developed a network of University personnel and 
offices to provide specialized services to students from abroad. 
These services are provided through the Office of Admission, the 
International Student Advisor, the Director of Residential Life, and 
the Dean of Students. 

The University has designated one member of the professional 
staff as the International Student Advisor. In addition to serving as 
liaison for students from abroad, the International Student Advisor 
will assist the student in securing necessary services provided 
through the support areas of the University. Special programs 
designed to help international students include the following: ESL 
tutorial assistance for undergraduates. Immigration Service advise- 
ment, and Orientation. 

Students interested in participating in the Residential Life pro- 
gram should contact the Office of Residential Life directly, as do all 
other entering students. While there is no distinct residential pro- 
gram for students from abroad, special efforts are made by the 
Office of Residential Life to consider the needs of the international 
student. 

Likewise, the University Health Service, while meeting the needs 
of all enrolled students, also considers the support needs of interna- 
tional students. All international students should take special note of 
the University's requirement that they maintain or secure appro- 
priate medical insurance coverage, either through their family or 
through the medical insurance plan offered through the University. 

All F- 1 students are responsible for obtaining immigration 
information and following all the regulations in order to maintain 
status. Page 2 of the 1-20 explains many of the obligations of an 
F-1 student. 

When in need of assistance, students are advised to contact either 
the International Student Advisor, Anita Lam, at 1500 Pine Street, 
Room 102, 215-875-2262, alam@uarts.edu, or the Office of the 
Deanof Student Services at 215-717-6675. ' 

Career Services 

As students advance academically and artistically, it is important 
for them to begin to develop a plan for their career in the arts. The 
Career Services Office assists students by providing comprehensive 
services and individual counseling tailored to their specific needs. 

Services for students include the following: career counseling; 
assistance with resume writing; interview techniques and job search 
skills; career resource library and industry publications/periodicals; 
Career Connections monthly newsletter; internship listings; job list- 
ings including freelance projects, part-time jobs, summer jobs, 
audition opportunities, and full-time career opportunities; informa- 
tion on fellowships, grants, and contests; annual Futures Fair (Career 
Day); Web site including online resumes, job listings and career 
links; graduate school information; and study-abroad information. 

The professionally trained staff of the Career Services Office pro- 
vides assistance to both students and alumni of The University of the 
Arts. For additional information, please contact: 

Elisa Kuriand, Director 

215-717-6075 

3rd Floor, Gershman Building 

careerservices@uarts.edu 



General Information 

Campus Security 

The University posts security personnel in all of its buildings to 
provide 24-hour protection. Every semester, identification cards are 
issued and validated by the Public Safety Office for all students, fac- 
ulty, and employees. Public Safety officers may deny access to 
University facilities for anyone not carrying a validated identifica- 
tion card. Spot-checking of identification cards occurs throughout 
the day. Complete identification checking occurs each weekday 
from 7:15 p.m. until 8 a.m.; after 12 noon on Saturday until 8 a.m. 
on Monday; and when classes are not in session. The general 
campus area is patrolled on a regular basis. 

Campus Security also provides programs to develop student 
awareness of safety and security concerns in an effort to diminish 
exposure to loss. The campus Security Department administers the 
University Safety Program to ensure the safety of all students, fac- 
ulty, and staff. 

In the event of a family emergency about which it is necessary to 
contact students at the University, parents or guardians should call 
215-717-6401 at any time of the day. Security personnel will take 
the necessary information, contact the appropriate offices to locate 
the student, and deliver the message. 

Escort Service 

Public Safety ■ . 

215-717-5400 

The Escort Service provides safe transportation for any member 
of the University community to any address that falls between 3rd 
and 23rd streets, bordered by Race and Federal streets. The Escort 
Service operates daily from 7 p.m. to 3 a.m., and picks up passen- 
gers every half hour from Anderson Hall, the Terra Building, and the 
1228 Spruce Residence Hall. The service is in effect from the 
second week in September through the third week in May, with the 
exception of scheduled University holidays and closings. 

Sciiool Closings 

In the event of inclement weather, members of the University 
community should listen to KYW 1060 AM radio for announce- 
ments of school closings. The University code number is 1 16. 
Additionally, members of the University community can check 
NBC- 10 TV or KYW-TV3 where the school name will be listed at 
the bottom of the screen. Closing information is also available on- 
line at www.NBClO.com or www.kywl060.com. 

Please refer to the Academic Calendar in the front of this catalog 
for scheduled school closings and holidays. Regularly observed hol- 
idays include New Years Day, Martin Luther King Jr. Day, Memorial 
Day, the 4th of July, Labor Day, Thanksgiving, and the following 
day, and Christmas. 

Automobiles 

Students living in the University's residence halls are not per- 
mitted to maintain vehicles (except bicycles) on campus. Any 
resident student found to be maintaining a vehicle (except a bicycle) 
on campus will be subject to disciplinary action by the Dean of 
Students. Such action may include dismissal from the residence 
halls. Students with disabilities may request an exemption from this 
rule from the Dean of Students. 



226 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



Veterans 

As an accredited degree-granting institution, the University is 
approved for tlie training of veterans. Information about education 
benefits may be obtained from any VA office. 

Student Assistance General 
Provisions 

In accordance witti the Higher Education Amendments of 1998, 
The University of the Arts has available, upon request, information 
regarding academic programs, financial assistance, and institutional 
policies and statistics. This information may be found in the 
University's catalog. 

The Student Assistance General Provisions report includes infor- 
mation on the following: 

• Accreditation, 

• Current degree programs including related facilities and faculty, 

• Tuition, fees, and other estimated expenses, 

• Withdrawal and refund policies, 

• Description of financial aid programs, including eligibility, 
award criteria, and application procedures, as well as students" 
rights and responsibilities upon receiving financial assistance 
(such as continued eligibility, exit counseling, and options for 
payment deferral), 

• Requirements for the return of Title IV grant or loan assistance, 

• Services available for students with disabilities, 

• Graduation rate. 

In addition, each October, the Public Safety Department publishes 
an annual report on the University's security policies and crime sta- 
tistics, which is available to all current and prospective students and 
employees. 

To request a copy of the Student Assistance General Provisions 
report, please contact the Office of the Provost, The University of 
the Arts, 320 South Broad Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19102. 



Code of Conduct 



The University's regulations governing nonacademic student con- 
duct safeguard the particular values and common welfare of the 
student body and promote the best possible environment for study. 
Membership in the University is regarded as a privilege, and the stu- 
dent is expected to exercise self-discipline and good judgement. By 
registration, the student acknowledges the University's authority to 
define and enforce standards of acceptable conduct. Adjudication of 
alleged student misconduct is the responsibility of the Office of the 
Dean of Students. A committee on campus standards, representing 
the student body, faculty, and administration, serves in an advisory 
capacity to the Dean. The Campus Standards Committee may rec- 
ommend suspension, dismissal, or expulsion for student conduct 
considered unacceptable at the University. 

A complete set of rules and procedures is contained in the current 
code for student rights, responsibilities, and conduct. This Student 
Code of Conduct may be found in both this Catalog and the Student 
Handbook. 

University policy provides that a student may be required to with- 
draw from the University for psychological/health reasons. A 
student who is withdrawn under this policy is one whose behavior 
necessitates a leave from the University community. 

Academic Distionesty 

The University of the Arts does not condone any form of academic 
dishonesty, including cheating on exams, plagiarism, or similar types 
of behavior. Lack of knowledge of citation procedures, for example, is 
an unacceptable explanation for plagiarism, as is having studied 
together for remarkably similar papers submitted by two students. 
Penalties for any form of academic dishonesty may include a repri- 
mand, a failing grade or non-credit for a particular assignment, a 
failing grade in the course, disciplinary probation, suspension, dis- 
missal, and/or expulsion. 

If a faculty member suspects a student of any form of plagiarism 
or academic dishonesty, the faculty member may address the issue 
directly w ith the student. The faculty member shall determine an 
appropriate course of action after meeting with the student and may 
impose penalties, which include repeating the project, resubmitting 
the paper, failing the project or paper, or failing the course. The 
department chair or director must be notified in writing when the 
student receives a failing grade in the course as a result of academic 
dishonesty on the student's part. 

Both the faculty member and the student have the right to forward 
the case, in the form of a written complaint, to the chair or director 
of the department. (If the instructor is also the chair or director of 
the department, the case goes directiy to the Office of the Dean, and 
to the Provost in the case of the Director of Liberal Arts.) If the fac- 
"ulty member considers the act of dishonesty serious enough to 
warrant a more serious penalty, he/she must forward the case to the 
next level, i.e., the department chair or director, or the Dean of the 
College or the Provost. 

If the student or faculty member chooses to appeal the decision 
made by the chair or director; the student or instructor may forward 
the case to the Dean of the College. A request for such an appeal 
must be submitted in writing. The Dean has the right to assemble a 
committee to address the case, or when suspension or expulsion may 
result, to forward the case to the Dean of Students. 

If the student seeks a further appeal, the case may be brought to 



The University of the Arts Undergraduate and Graduate Course Catalog 2003/2004 



227 



the Provost, who has the right to assemble a committee to review the 
case. Please note that the Provost's decision is the final and binding 
decision in such cases and no further appeal will be entertained. 

Sexual Harassment and Other 
Prohibited Harassment 

The University of the Arts is committed to maintaining an envi- 
ronment in which students, faculty, and staff may pursue academic, 
artistic, and professional excellence. This environment can be 
secured only through mutual respect and unconstrained academic 
and professional interchange among faculty, staff, and students. 
Faculty, staff, and students of the University are entitled to partici- 
pate in and obtain the benefits of the University programs, activities, 
and employment without being discriminated against on the basis of 
their sex, race, religion, creed, age, ethnicity, national origin, preg- 
nancy, disability, sexual orientation, or military status. 

The University regards any act of sexual harassment or harass- 
ment because of race, religion, creed, age, ethnicity, national origin, 
pregnancy, disability, sexual orientation, or military status to be a 
violation of the standards of conduct required of all persons associ- 
ated with the institution. The prohibition against sexual harassment 
and other forms of harassment applies to all interactions occurring 
on campus, in University facilities, or within the context of 
University-related activities. 

The rights defined by this policy apply to all University faculty, 
students, and employees and the obligations are binding on all fac- 
ulty and staff as part of their employment regardless of tenure or 
years of service, and all students, regardless of academic status. 

Harassment constitutes a serious offense and the University will 
take all necessary disciplinary actions to eradicate it from the 
University. Those who commit harassment prohibited by this policy 
are subject to the full range of discipline, up to and including imme- 
diate dismissal from the University faculty or employment, or 
expulsion from the University, as appropriate. 

The prohibitions set forth in this policy include acts of retaliation 
against members of the University community who have filed com- 
plaints under this policy. 

Substance Abuse Policy 

The members of The University of the Arts community and their 
health and safety are of paramount concern. The University will not 
tolerate drug and alcohol abuse, as it imperils the health and well- 
being of its faculty, staff, and students, and threatens the operation of 
its educational programs. 

The use, possession, or distribution of illegal drugs and abuse of 
other controlled substances, in or out of class, or on University 
premises is inconsistent with law-abiding behavior expected of all 
students, and may result in discipline, up to and including expulsion. 

The University prohibits the illegal and/or unauthorized manufac- 
ture, sale, or delivery, holding, offering for sale, possession, or use 
of any controlled substance as defined under the P